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Gwadabe Kurawa

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 4 aimed at ensuring an inclusive, equitable, quality education, and promoting lifelong learning opportunities for all…

Abstract

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 4 aimed at ensuring an inclusive, equitable, quality education, and promoting lifelong learning opportunities for all. However, this may not be effectively realized, as this chapter demonstrates, through formal learning or education alone. Rather, an adoption of non-formal and informal learning alongside formal learning is more likely to empower the general population to contribute toward the development of a sustainable society. This chapter therefore critically examines the concepts of lifelong learning and the learning society and suggests that community learning, or study circles, can be a promising institutional medium for the promotion of adult and lifelong learning. The rationale for establishing a study circle as a medium for lifelong learning is demonstrated through case studies from Zimbabwe and Sweden. This follows by comparing and contrasting the ways in which Sweden and Zimbabwe promote lifelong learning for all.

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Article

David Davies

This account aims to introduce contrasting perspectives on teaching and learning methods, and to detail the growth of new forms and vocabularies of access to learning. As…

Abstract

This account aims to introduce contrasting perspectives on teaching and learning methods, and to detail the growth of new forms and vocabularies of access to learning. As we move towards the new millennium, the development of national, yet diversified, credit frameworks and systems will provide an essential underpinning for the organisational culture that will be needed to sustain the wellbeing and growth of the educational system. These new systems are already being incorporated into the practice of ‘virtual’ education. Lifelong learning has widespread support across the social and political spectrum and its importance can hardly be over‐stated as we seek to maintain competitiveness in a changing world. Increasing knowledge and understanding to serve both the needs of the economy and of individuals to play a major role in democratic life has become an agenda of necessity as well as desire. An open society requires open systems of knowledge. A prognosis for the future is submitted where the significance of part‐time modular and open flexible learning is evaluated in terms of a curriculum rooted in useful knowledge and competences, acquired at different sites of learning, including the workplace. It is argued that modular structures, using the potential offered by credit accumulation and transfer to different institutions with different missions, can transcend and transform the learning opportunities for students in a mass system of higher education which is rapidly becoming part of a global market economy and society. Continuous lifelong learning involving its key features of open access, recognition of learning wherever it takes place and the growth of new learning networks and partnerships, is at the conceptual heart of the development of the virtual university.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article

Ritimoni Bordoloi, Prasenjit Das and Kandarpa Das

Lifelong learning needs to be visualized as the milestone for generating a progressive and knowledge society. Because it is through lifelong learning that one can…

Abstract

Purpose

Lifelong learning needs to be visualized as the milestone for generating a progressive and knowledge society. Because it is through lifelong learning that one can continuously upgrade one's knowledge and acquire the relevant skills for getting livelihood opportunities. Moreover, for ensuring a sustainable and advanced society in the 21st century industrial setup, people are desirous to receive a global form of learning as they tend to follow the principle, that is, “earning while learning”. In this context, the various types of online courses, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and Open Educational Resources (OERs) provide myriad opportunities to the people by introducing them to a global form of learning. Against this background, the introduction of MOOCs in India for providing lifelong learning opportunities might work in a big way. However, to what extent, can MOOCs promote the idea of lifelong learning in a vast country like India needs to be discussed in greater detail.

Design/methodology/approach

While writing the paper, descriptive research methodology has been used. The sources such as Report of Census 2011, Human Development Report 2016, 2018, Economic Survey 2016 are also consulted. Analysis has been done based on the data extracted from the secondary source of information.

Findings

The literature review made in the paper implies that the educational institutes across India may adopt some of the good national and international practices for transforming the society and produce some need-based MOOCs under the SWAYAM platform with regard to providing opportunities of lifelong learning. Thus, the courses run through SWAYAM should help in achieving the three cardinal principles of the Indian Education – access, equity and quality. However, there are many challenges to be met while the adoption and development of MOOCs for the purpose of lifelong learning in India are taken into consideration. The current modes and popularity of digitally offered education in India thus need to be justified.

Research limitations/implications

The discussions made in the paper are limited to a reference to the Indian MOOCs particularly under SWAYAM, and it is a general study only.

Practical implications

It is important to note that a new kind of transformation is currently being initiated across the world by encouraging more and more online interventions in the field of education. In fact, various studies are also being conducted on the implementation of online courses across the world, particularly in the developed countries where more than 70% education is delivered online. However, in a country like India, the practical utility or the implementation of the online courses such as MOOCs is not so popular even at present, and it is only limited to a small section of the society. The University Grants Commission (UGC) with a view to promoting CBCS as well as Credit Transfer made 20% course delivery through MOOCs mandatory in Indian higher education. However, the CBCS system itself has several loopholes considered in the Indian context, as it was launched without sufficient ground work, and no one seems to have a clear idea of its implementation method. The UGC's move was to introduce a system of education that would help in bringing parity of Indian higher education with Western or European higher education systems. This paper shall try to imply how the Indian MOOCs should be used in providing lifelong learning opportunities to the people of the country.

Social implications

This paper refers to a new social constructivism initiated through MOOCs, where a learner can directly interact with the people in the community, share their own ideas and thoughts and collectively undertake new researches. This is sure to transform the Indian society in the days to come, although a study on the usefulness of the existing MOOCs is of utmost necessity

Originality/value

This paper reiterates the necessity of a detailed study of the available MOOCs in India based on the findings of the common problems and challenges of MOOCs development and implementations that need to be resolved first. Then the paper provides an analysis of this situation so that one could develop or adopt a MOOC in order to meet one's need of lifelong learning in a country like India.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

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Article

ELLI (European Lifelong Learning Initiative) (http://www.noesis.se:443/ll/elli/elli.html) was established in 1992 to help propagate ideas and actions in Lifelong Learning

Abstract

ELLI (European Lifelong Learning Initiative) (http://www.noesis.se:443/ll/elli/elli.html) was established in 1992 to help propagate ideas and actions in Lifelong Learning in Europe. Its offshoot WILL (World Initiative on Lifelong Learning) was established in December 1994 at the First Global Conference on Lifelong Learning to do the same thing at a global level. Both are membership organisations trying to make the most effective use of organisational and personal expertise from among their subscribers. We spoke to Norman Longworth, ELLI's Chief Consultant and former Director of Strategy, about its background and role.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article

Christy R. Stevens and Patricia J. Campbell

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the concepts of lifelong learning, information literacy, and global citizenship, making explicit connections among them…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the concepts of lifelong learning, information literacy, and global citizenship, making explicit connections among them via theories of social capital. It then presents a model of librarian‐faculty collaboration that relies upon information literacy as a framework for fostering lifelong learning and global citizenship.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with a theoretical analysis of lifelong learning, information literacy, global citizenship, and social capital in order to provide a conceptual framework for the case study that follows. The case study describes the librarian‐faculty collaboration, which included the development of course goals, the syllabus, learning outcomes and objectives, assignments, course‐integrated library instruction sessions, and assessment tools.

Findings

Social capital is a useful theoretical tool for conceptualizing pedagogical strategies for promoting information literacy and global citizenship. Pre‐ and post‐tests, questionnaires, assignments, and student reflections indicate that the three primary goals of the collaboration were met. By the end of the course, students' IL competencies improved, students had developed a better understanding of their roles as global citizens, and students were more aware of the connections among global citizenship, lifelong learning, and information literacy.

Practical implications

The paper provides practical ideas for librarian‐faculty collaboration and for integrating information literacy competencies into assignment sequences.

Originality/value

The paper uses social capital theory to make connections among lifelong learning, information literacy, and global citizenship as well as to argue for the value and import of librarian‐faculty collaborations. It also describes a successful librarian‐faculty collaboration in the context of a Global Studies course.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article

Gillian Leader

The lifelong learning agenda maintains a pivotal role in educational discourse. It reflects government policy that as a conceptual framework it is shaping a new model of…

Abstract

The lifelong learning agenda maintains a pivotal role in educational discourse. It reflects government policy that as a conceptual framework it is shaping a new model of learning. Moreover, it reinforces the view that the establishment of a learning society is vital to meet the growing diversity of economic and social imperatives. This paper explores some of the challenges facing further education in constructing an effective and vocational paradigm for lifelong learning that addresses the impact of widening participation and accessibility. It highlights the significance of recent post‐16 government initiatives and the relationship between a knowledge economy and the inclusive learning agenda in the context of policy and practice.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 45 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Stephanie E. Raible and Wayne Jacoby

The chapter presents findings from five qualitative reports from educators within the compulsory education sector who have partnered with a United Nations-recognized…

Abstract

The chapter presents findings from five qualitative reports from educators within the compulsory education sector who have partnered with a United Nations-recognized, nongovernmental organization (NGO), Global Education Motivators (GEM), in order to either introduce or expand curricular support for their students or to engage in professional dialogue with fellow educators facilitated through international videoconferencing programs. Through a long-standing collaboration between these educators, GEM has jointly developed programming which educates students on the United Nations and global issues including sustainability, human rights, child labor, poverty, and peace and conflict studies. Using an email-based survey questionnaire, the reported cases aim to explore the educators’ motivations to introduce and expand their students’ global engagement through the media of videoconferencing. The chapter highlights the potential outcomes of international videoconferencing for educators as a classroom tool or a professional development resource, as well as detailing a case study of an NGO–college partnership in which the NGO provides expertise, student internships, and noncredit professional development opportunities to its campus community and beyond.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention using Multimedia Technologies: Video Annotation, Multimedia Applications, Videoconferencing and Transmedia Storytelling
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-514-2

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Article

Menaha Thayaparan, Mohan Siriwardena, Chamindi Ishara Malalgoda, Dilanthi Amaratunga, Irene Lill and Arturas Kaklauskas

Due to the complexities involved in disasters and due to the peculiar nature of post-disaster reconstruction, built environment professionals require continuous updating…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to the complexities involved in disasters and due to the peculiar nature of post-disaster reconstruction, built environment professionals require continuous updating of their skills and knowledge to contribute effectively to disaster resilience. The purpose of this paper is to identify the ways in which higher education institutions (HEIs) can address this need through the provision of lifelong learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on both a literature review and on empirical evidence obtained through interviews, a workshop and group validation.

Findings

The challenges faced by HEIs in accommodating lifelong learning are presented. Furthermore, good practice guidelines are provided to enable HEIs to respond effectively to industry requirements; to provide lifelong learning via through-life studentship; to promote collaboration amongst HEIs, industries, professional bodies and communities, and to promote the adoption, diffusion and exploitation of the latest learning and teaching technologies.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical focus of the research is limited to three EU countries, namely UK, Lithuania and Estonia. This paper focuses on role of HEIs in enhancing the disaster risk reduction (DRR) capacity in the built environment, especially at the stage of post-disaster reconstruction.

Practical implications

The recommendations provided on good practice suggest how HEIs can integrate disaster related knowledge into their curriculum faster than previously and how they are able to assist their educators and learners in building up their knowledge base on a continuous basis.

Social implications

Capacity building in enhancing DRR during the post-disaster reconstruction stage through the provision of lifelong learning will create social implications within the responsiveness of built environment professionals to cater for disaster resilience.

Originality/value

The appropriateness of lifelong learning as an approach to disaster management education is justified. The challenges HEIs face in accommodating lifelong learning and the recommendations on good practice guidelines in order to make the HEIs more responsive to educational needs are discussed.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Gaston Kapuku Mudipanu

More than 25 years, researchers have observed that an insufficient understanding and mastering of related concepts to leadership and lifelong learning has not much…

Abstract

More than 25 years, researchers have observed that an insufficient understanding and mastering of related concepts to leadership and lifelong learning has not much contributed to the much-desired development in higher education. This chapter discusses the way in which past reforms of higher education in Democratic Republic of Congo have been conducted, and how its development was jeopardized by deep misunderstanding of the concept and principles of leadership and lifelong learning. Preliminary findings from the analysis of the experience of reforms in higher education may suggest strategies that could successfully apply to any future reforms of the higher education system in Democratic Republic of Congo. Leaders could also learn from a lifelong learning process that ought to exercise a strong political will and courage to shift from the model inherited from a colonial system.

Details

Global Perspectives on Educational Leadership Reform: The Development and Preparation of Leaders of Learning and Learners of Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-445-1

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Article

Aminudin Zuhairi, Amy Ching Tsu Hsueh and I-Chin Nonie Chiang

This research attempts to reveal ways of addressing challenges in open universities related to empowering lifelong learning; establishing policies and strategies in…

Abstract

Purpose

This research attempts to reveal ways of addressing challenges in open universities related to empowering lifelong learning; establishing policies and strategies in dropouts, student portfolio and support services for students with special needs; and implementing online instructional design and strategies. Two institutions were investigated, namely National Open University (NOU) Taiwan and Universitas Terbuka (UT) Indonesia, both founded in the 1980s to serve lifelong learners with diverse backgrounds and needs. This study was aimed at understanding good practices and challenges for improvement for the two open universities in those areas being investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was qualitative using document analysis along with focus group discussions and interviews with administrators, academic staff, students and alumni to collect data for analysis.

Findings

Lifelong learning is the necessity of individual in societies for continuing professional development through enabling access to quality university education. Open universities have been tasked to cater for lifelong learners using non-traditional approaches, new technology and adapting to online learning and teaching in digital age. This research was exploratory, and the findings were expected to improve understanding of lifelong learning in open universities, particularly in NOU and UT.

Practical implications

Findings of this research are relevant to open universities to enhance its missions and define its possible new roles to serve lifelong learners.

Originality/value

This research reveals the roles of open universities in lifelong learning and enhances understanding of open universities that have a wide range of responsibilities in offering programs and courses to accommodate lifelong learners.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

Keywords

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