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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Michael Harvey, Milorad Novicevic and Jacob W. Breland

The purpose of this paper is to use hope theory as a foundation from which to understand the global dual‐career exploration phenomenon. Additionally, the concept of…

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2181

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use hope theory as a foundation from which to understand the global dual‐career exploration phenomenon. Additionally, the concept of curiosity is explored as a triggering mechanism for dual‐career couples to explore and learn about career options in a global context.

Design/methodology/approach

Hope theory is used to provide theoretical support for the proposed conceptual model.

Findings

It is concluded that hope and curiosity are important elements for dual‐career couples to leverage in order to reduce stress, maintain marital status, and allow the trailing spouse to resolve the potential dramatic and negative impact on their career path.

Practical implications

Both hope and curiosity have been argued to have developmental aspects, meaning that individuals can nurture and strengthen their level of hopefulness and curiosity. Organizations which aid individuals in developing these abilities will likely increase the probability that their global employees will successfully complete their foreign assignment.

Originality/value

The paper explicitly examines dual‐career exploration as it occurs in a global context. More specifically, it takes the perspective that global dual‐career exploration is a continuous and adaptive process in which individuals who are hopeful and curious will be more successful in exploring and adapting to career options.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Malin H. Näsholm

Although research has shown differences between self-initiated experiences and expatriation, this differentiation has rarely been made when it comes to more long-term…

Abstract

Purpose

Although research has shown differences between self-initiated experiences and expatriation, this differentiation has rarely been made when it comes to more long-term global careers. The purpose of this paper is to identify similarities and differences between repeat expatriates and international itinerants in their career paths, subjective experiences, and narratives of how they relate to their context.

Design/methodology/approach

A narrative approach was used and interviews were conducted with ten repeat expatriates and ten international itinerants. The career paths of the 20 Swedish global careerists and how they narrate their careers are analyzed, and the two types of global careerists are compared.

Findings

Results show that the repeat expatriates and international itinerants differ in their subjective experiences of global careers, and how they narrate them. Three broad domains are identified that integrate a range of issues that are important for global careerists. These domains are the organization and career domain, the country and culture domain, and the family, communities, and networks domain. The repeat expatriates and international itinerants differ in how they relate to these and what is important to them.

Practical implications

The differences found have implications for organizations in terms of recruitment, management, and retention of a global talent pool.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the understanding of subjective experiences of global careers and integrates a range of aspects in the context of global careerists that are important to them. Moreover, it contributes to the understanding of global careers by differentiating between those with intra- and inter-organizational global careers.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Yvonne McNulty and Charles M. Vance

Most studies of expatriates have explored global careers as unfolding within assigned or self-initiated expatriation contexts in a predominantly linear fashion. The…

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2421

Abstract

Purpose

Most studies of expatriates have explored global careers as unfolding within assigned or self-initiated expatriation contexts in a predominantly linear fashion. The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize that expatriates’ career progression is facilitated by frequent moves between domains, with an increasing overlap among assigned-expatriate (AE) and self-initiated expatriate (SIE) contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Underpinned by findings from extant literature, the authors review and integrate studies of expatriation and careers to conceptualize an AE-SIE career continuum.

Findings

The authors debunk the idea that AEs and SIEs are a type of expatriate per se, but instead is indicative only of their career orientation in terms of where they choose to sit on the AE-SIE career continuum at any point in time. Specifically, individuals pursuing global careers in international labor markets include up to eight types of expatriate who retain varying degrees of AE vs SIE characteristics dependent on the point they choose along the continuum.

Practical implications

The tension that dynamic global careers cause for multinational enterprises (MNEs) is not necessarily “bad”, and that by accepting and accommodating changes in career orientation MNEs will be able to make clearer and more consistent global staffing decisions.

Originality/value

The authors provide a new, improved conceptualization of linear and non-linear global careers and of the challenges global career actors face throughout their career development both at home and abroad. They further show that while career orientation explains why expatriates engage in various types of international work experiences, their typology adds explication of the various types of expatriate who pursue global careers.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Steve McKenna and Amanda Peticca-Harris

This paper aims to present two objectives. The first objective is to identify the academic knowledge interests (managerial, agentic, curatorial and critical) prevalent in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present two objectives. The first objective is to identify the academic knowledge interests (managerial, agentic, curatorial and critical) prevalent in research on global careers. The second objective is to consider and critique the discourse constructed and perpetuated in academic texts on global careers concerning globalization, global careers and the global careerist.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a critical discourse analysis, the paper analyzes 66 articles and book chapters and one book on the subject of a global career. The authors positioned the texts into one of the four academic knowledge interests – managerial, agentic, curatorial and critical. The texts were also analyzed with respect to the discourse manifested in relation to globalization, global careers and the global careerist.

Findings

The authors found that the texts were driven by primarily managerial academic knowledge interests, followed by agentic and curatorial interests. Very few reflected critical knowledge interests. In addition, texts on global careers accept the globalization of business as natural and unproblematic and, consequently, construct a discourse about the global career and the global careerist which fits the idea that global business expansion in its current form is inevitable and inescapable.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to analyze the academic knowledge production and discourse on “global careers” and the “global careerist” as it is emerging among career scholars. It is also one of the very few articles offering a more critical perspective on global careers specifically and careers more generally.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Henrik Holt Larsen

Modern global career implies not only an interaction between an organization and an individual but also – and increasingly – a mutual dependency between the two parties…

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2149

Abstract

Modern global career implies not only an interaction between an organization and an individual but also – and increasingly – a mutual dependency between the two parties. Whereas the traditional career concept presupposes that the individual employee to a high extent has to adhere to the conditions and opportunities provided by the organization, organizations increasingly have to accept and match the expectations and demands of the employee. In particular, this is found in knowledge intensive organizations providing immaterial “products” like know‐how, complex problem solving, consultancy service, etc. This kind of immaterial “production” not only requires highly skilled and professional employees but also means that the employees possess the core competence of the company – and can carry it out of the organization if they choose to resign. The paper analyzes the dual dependency in global careers and discusses this interdependency from the viewpoints of both individual and organization. In addition, the paper outlines the implications for practitioners and future research.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 23 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Tineke Cappellen and Maddy Janssens

This study aims to empirically examine the career competencies of global managers having world‐wide coordination responsibility: knowing‐why, knowing‐how and knowing‐whom…

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7039

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically examine the career competencies of global managers having world‐wide coordination responsibility: knowing‐why, knowing‐how and knowing‐whom career competencies.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on in‐depth interviews with 45 global managers, the paper analyzes career stories from a content analysis approach. Data were collected in three organizations operating in a transnational environment.

Findings

Knowing‐why competencies sought for in the position of global manager relate to work‐life balance, international exposure, professional identification, center of decision making, career progression and search for challenge. The knowing‐how competencies developed from the position of global manager relate to operational skills and general business understanding. In terms of knowing‐whom competencies, the findings indicate that respondents used their professional networks and personal networks to obtain the position of global manager.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by its reliance on global managers' career stories and the restriction of the sample to global managers working at headquarters.

Practical implications

The study concludes by discussing managerial implications that match the findings in terms of the three career competencies.

Originality/value

The study suggests that global managers' career competencies act as motivators, outcomes as well as means to make career moves. It also indicates the primacy of knowing‐why competencies in global managers' career capital.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2007

Vesa Suutari and Kristiina Mäkelä

The purpose of this paper is to address the research question of “How does a global career involving multiple international relocations influence the career capital of an…

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4919

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the research question of “How does a global career involving multiple international relocations influence the career capital of an individual manager?”, and to examine the typical career‐capital‐related characteristics, drivers and outcomes associated with global careers. The importance of understanding the careers of global leaders, whose work paths typically include various international positions and assignments, has increased due to the globalization of business. A particularly relevant approach for studying such careers is through a framework of career capital, which adopts an individualistic perspective to explain how actors consciously acquire portable capabilities, construct networks and identify their own motivations, applying them in their specific work contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a qualitative design based on interviews with 20 managers on a global career path involving multiple international assignments.

Findings

The results indicate that international work experience has an extensive developmental effect on the career capital of managers. First, the interviewees reported that their global careers had strongly increased their knowing‐why career capital, referring to meaning and self‐awareness. With regard to knowing‐how career capital, their multiple international experiences had considerably enhanced several work‐related competencies. The key drivers behind this development included the broad range of responsibilities, the nature of the international environment, a high level of autonomy, and cross‐cultural differences. Finally, in terms of knowing‐whom capital, the results of the study indicate that the contact network managers acquire during their international assignments was of very high importance for their future careers. As a further outcome of their global careers, the managers were found to have a very strong career identity.

Originality/value

This paper provides a novel perspective on a topic that is of increasingly critical importance in today's global business.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Vesa Suutari and Milla Taka

The importance of understanding the careers of global leaders, who typically have careers including various international positions and assignments, has increased due to…

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5212

Abstract

The importance of understanding the careers of global leaders, who typically have careers including various international positions and assignments, has increased due to the globalization of business. One relevant approach to such careers is the internal career approach. Here the career anchor is seen as a person's self‐concept, consisting of self‐perceived talents, values, and the evolved sense of motives as they pertain to the career. The present study provides new evidence regarding such career anchors of global leaders through a qualitative research setting. The results of the study indicate that most managers saw that their decisions are based on two or even three career anchors instead of one dominating anchor. The most typical career anchors of the original career anchor classification were managerial competence and pure challenge. The key conclusion is the importance of the new internationalism anchor among the global leaders: the clear majority of them ranked the internationalism anchor as their major anchor or among the few major anchors.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 23 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Wolfgang Mayrhofer, Alexandre Iellatchitch, Michael Meyer, Johannes Steyrer, Michael Schiffinger and Guido Strunk

New forms of organising and new forms of individuals private and professional life concepts have affected organisations as well as careers. The resulting new forms of…

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2456

Abstract

New forms of organising and new forms of individuals private and professional life concepts have affected organisations as well as careers. The resulting new forms of careers are characterised by two major elements: organisations are no longer the primary arena for professional careers and the diversity of careers and career paths is sharply increasing. At the level of global careers similar developments can be observed. In addition, two specifics can be mentioned: a number of additional forms of working internationally supplement expatriation in its classic sense and there seems to be an increasing pressure on the speed and diversity of international assignments. There is comparatively little theoretical insight into these developments. Departing from a sociological perspective and using the theoretical framework of late French Sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, this paper takes a career field and habitus perspective of careers. Based on that, it tries to identify areas of contribution for the global career discussion that can emerge from such an approach.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 23 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Vesa Suutari

The need for developing a cadre of global managers who are capable of working in international key positions wherever the needs of companies require it, has been widely…

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5227

Abstract

The need for developing a cadre of global managers who are capable of working in international key positions wherever the needs of companies require it, has been widely stressed. Typically, the literature on international careers still deals with international assignments as “once‐in‐a‐lifetime” experiences and thus as a continuum from selecting the right candidates to repatriating them back to the home country. Less attention has been devoted to so‐called global managers who are committed to international careers for a longer term. In the present study, career orientations, career tracks, career commitment and life‐style implications of global managers are analysed. The results indicate that the majority of managers were originally interested in an international career. In their career they typically vary between positions abroad and in the home country instead of moving from one international assignment to another. Typically they consider the positive implications to override the negative implications of such a career with respect to both themselves and their families. As a result, they are often firmly committed to working in international environments in the future.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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