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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Laurie Windsor, Glenn Roberts and Paul Dieppe

Recovery Colleges could deliver many of the defined key outcomes within the Cross Governmental Mental Health Outcomes Framework “no health without mental health” (Department of…

Abstract

Purpose

Recovery Colleges could deliver many of the defined key outcomes within the Cross Governmental Mental Health Outcomes Framework “no health without mental health” (Department of Health, 2011). The purpose of this paper is to critically appraise the existing evidence of recovery educational programmes in mental health and gain a deeper understanding of the processes and outcomes involved.

Design/methodology/approach

A broad search strategy looking at recovery educational programmes in mental health was used. The data were gathered from two focus groups each containing five people, one with facilitators and one with students. Thematic analysis was used, following the six stages, recursive process recommended by Braun and Clarke (2006).

Findings

The main processes described in recovery programmes were co-production and education. The main outcomes were that recovery programmes led to a reduction in the use of health services, increased opportunities for future employment and a positive impact on staff. The process themes that appeared to emerge were the College ethos and principles, co-production, safety, empowerment and stimulation. The outcome themes that appeared to emerge included increased confidence, motivation and social interaction.

Originality/value

Recovery Colleges appear to benefit both facilitators and students by co-production of a safe, stimulating environment which empowers them: participating in the college benefits facilitators as well as students. This paper is of value to those interested in recovery and education within mental health.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2010

Ann Ley, Glenn Roberts and Dawn Willis

Although limited, there is emerging evidence of the value of peer support for people with mental health issues. We report an evaluation of a training experience introducing…

Abstract

Although limited, there is emerging evidence of the value of peer support for people with mental health issues. We report an evaluation of a training experience introducing intentional peer support (IPS) to people who use mental health services. IPS is a well developed, specific approach in which the central concept of mutuality redefines help as a co‐learning and growing process. This paper aims to explore participants' initial understandings of peer support, assess the impact of the course in terms of subsequent peer support activities and gather reflections from participants concerning what helped and hindered putting IPS into practice.Thirty people attending a five‐day residential course run by the originator of IPS, Shery Mead, were invited to take part in two refresher/follow‐up workshops. An independent evaluator (first author) collected data at the start and end of the residential phase, at two months and at five months. Findings are based on 26 people who provided data on at least two occasions.The course was enthusiastically received and successfully conveyed the fundamentals of IPS. Proportions of people involved in general peer support at the start and end of the evaluation remained similar. At five months, 15 people reported involvement in IPS and one person had set up an IPS group. Being connected to an existing group or network, including maintaining connection with course participants was the most helpful feature in putting IPS into practice. Hindrances included isolation and lack of opportunity. The paper concludes that ongoing support is essential to encourage the post‐course development and practice of IPS.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

Zoe Riley and Jerome Carson

The purpose of this paper is to provide a profile of Zoe Riley.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a profile of Zoe Riley.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study approach, Zoe provides an account of her background and is then interviewed by Jerome.

Findings

Zoe’s account reveals a remarkable resilience developed through adversity but nurtured by the love of her grandparents.

Research limitations/implications

Mental illness surrounded Zoe when she was growing up. Her own mother experienced years of distress. Her grandfather effectively was her father. Despite the childhood adversity and her own teenage problems, she came through it all. These are the stories you read about in textbooks.

Practical implications

Zoe reminds us that people in distress want to find connection. They do not want us sitting there writing notes and not even looking at them!

Social implications

The authors talk about “wounded healers”. Dr Glenn Roberts said that his own bouts of depression made it easier for him to sit with people in similar turmoil. The value of peer support has been underrated by many.

Originality/value

It is of course a truism to say that everyone’s journey of recovery is unique. The author knows Zoe has already touched the lives of many people. The author is sure she has so much more to contribute.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Glenn Roberts, John Good, James Wooldridge and Elina Baker

This paper aims to describe a review and overview of the issue of developing guidance on implementing recovery and supporting organisational change, focused specifically on…

445

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a review and overview of the issue of developing guidance on implementing recovery and supporting organisational change, focused specifically on seeking to clarify the many different contributions that “lived experience” could make to training and workforce development.

Design/methodology/approach

The particular focus of our workshop was to clarify the key issues in workforce development, training for a recovery‐focused service and the contribution of “lived experience”. A particular outcome was to emphasise the benefits of collaborative co‐working between people who use services and practitioners at all levels.

Findings

A key element of our learning has been in valuing collaborative co‐working and the synergism of personal experience, professional training, research and evaluation.

Originality/value

The paper draws out what lessons have been learned already and sketches guidance for future practice and service development.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Elizabeth Frayn, Joanna Duke, Helen Smith, Philip Wayne and Glenn Roberts

The potential transformative role of recovery colleges is well-documented in community mental health settings. The purpose of this paper is to reproduce the principles of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The potential transformative role of recovery colleges is well-documented in community mental health settings. The purpose of this paper is to reproduce the principles of the recovery college approach in a forensic setting in Devon.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes the inaugural two-year development process, from ideas to a functioning service, accessible to patients in both medium secure, low and open settings on the Langdon hospital site, drawing on qualitative accounts from staff and service users involved.

Findings

Creating and maintaining an educational space within the forensic environment where people have real choices to learn and work on their recovery is possible and valued by service users and clinicians alike.

Originality/value

Langdon was one of the first forensic hospitals in the UK to introduce a recovery college, and the report of the positive impact and challenges involved may be useful to others setting out on this journey.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

Hans Oh, Douglas Noordsy and Glenn Roberts

– To galvanize practical discussion about how to modify psychiatry residency programs to instill the recovery paradigm into students who will become psychiatrists.

Abstract

Purpose

To galvanize practical discussion about how to modify psychiatry residency programs to instill the recovery paradigm into students who will become psychiatrists.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of relevant literature is undertaken.

Findings

Eight suggestions are offered to help residency programs initiate conversations about recovery.

Originality/value

There has been little, if any, discussion about how psychiatry residency programs must change in terms of curriculum and pedagogy.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Julie Leibrich and Jerome Carson

This paper aims to offer a profile of Julie Leibrich.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer a profile of Julie Leibrich.

Design/methodology/approach

After a short introduction by Jerome, Julie provides a short biography and is then interviewed by Jerome. Areas covered in the interview include community care, discovery and sanctuary.

Findings

Julie is a psychologist, a poet and someone who has “lived experience” of mental health problems. Julie tells us about the historical problems of implementing community care, here and in New Zealand; she suggests that discrimination towards the mentally ill is more important than stigma; she talks about the importance of “A Gift of Stories” and why she has written her latest book on sanctuary.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that Julie provides a unique perspective on recovery, though she prefers the term discovery. Her experiences as a research psychologist and as someone with lived experience have informed her writing.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 May 2023

Sarah N. Mitchell, Antoinette M. Landor and Katharine H. Zeiders

Research has shown that for young adults, marital attitudes (e.g., desire, importance, and expectation) are associated with relationship quality. However, how this association…

Abstract

Research has shown that for young adults, marital attitudes (e.g., desire, importance, and expectation) are associated with relationship quality. However, how this association plays out for young adults of color is less known. Additionally, the influence of skin tone perception on the relationship between marital attitudes and relationship quality remains understudied. To explore these associations, the authors examined African American and Latinx young adults (N = 57, Mage = 20.71 years, SD = 1.28; 75.4% female) attending a Midwestern university. Exploratory results indicated that marital expectations were positively associated with relationship quality in that young adults who expected to marry one day, reported greater relationship satisfaction, commitment, and intimacy in their current relationships. Additionally, skin tone perception moderated the association between marital attitudes and relationship quality in two ways (i.e., between expectations and satisfaction and between importance and intimacy). Collectively, findings suggest that differing levels of marital attitudes and skin tone perception contributes to young adults’ perceptions of relationship quality. Considering these psychological factors of attitudes, skin tone perception, and relationship quality, together with systemic racial/ethnic discrimination, the authors discuss future research and practice considerations.

Details

Conjugal Trajectories: Relationship Beginnings, Change, and Dissolutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-394-7

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2022

Jerome Carson and Robert Hurst

243

Abstract

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Peter Ryan

284

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

1 – 10 of 242