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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2011

Glenn D. Searle and Stephanie J. Hanrahan

The purpose of this paper was to examine inspiring others as a psychological construct in leadership contexts by investigating lived and personal experiences of inspiring leaders.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine inspiring others as a psychological construct in leadership contexts by investigating lived and personal experiences of inspiring leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenological design was used to investigate leaders' personal and lived experiences of leading to inspire others. In‐depth interviews were conducted with seven participants nominated by others as inspiring leaders based on the demonstration of five characteristics (vision, openness, transparency, passion, and being somewhat unconventional).

Findings

Participant responses coalesced into five key dimensions of leading to inspire others: connecting, leading, inspiree, action, and context; enabling a functional description of the phenomenon. Furthermore, results indicated that leaders could intentionally cultivate opportunities to inspire others through interaction and effort.

Research limitations/implications

Given that the paper investigates leaders' experiences of the phenomenon, further investigation into the relational and reciprocal aspects of inspiring others is required. Research has primarily focused on participants in the inspiring relationship independently of each other (i.e. either the inspiree or the leader).

Practical implications

Contrary to assertions in some transformational leadership studies that personal charisma is the primary component to inspiring others, these findings indicate that inspiring others requires an active process where leaders establish interpersonal connections and enable action.

Originality/value

Research on inspiration is at a formative stage. This paper represents an initial foray into the space where scholarly knowledge on leadership theory and inspiration intersect to provide greater insight into leading to inspire others.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Glenn F. Ross

Social interaction is a vital facet of life for all age‐groups; for older individuals, the exercise of interpersonal exchange, and the expectation of an accompanying sense…

Abstract

Social interaction is a vital facet of life for all age‐groups; for older individuals, the exercise of interpersonal exchange, and the expectation of an accompanying sense of well‐being, can assume an even greater importance when other aspects of life no longer provide opportunities for positive reward. Sociability experiences are likely to influence major indicators of both emotion and cognition, such as life and context satisfaction. The demonstration of personal competence, as may be found in the exercise of problem‐solving strategies, is also an important facility for seniors. This study of both domestic and international senior tourists has examined preferences for travel planning as the expression of a measure of personal control that are associated with sociability needs in regard to family and friends, cultural contacts, entertainment and nightlife, and to retail experiences. Also examined was the extent to which various sociability needs and planning control preferences influence measures of destination satisfaction, intention to return and also a willingness to recommend the destination. This study has found that seniors with higher sociability needs for cultural contact and associated with family and friends would more likely perceive the necessity to prepare for their trip, and also would express higher levels of satisfaction; destination satisfaction was also found to be associated with both the expressed intention to return to the destination, and also a willingness to recommend the destination to others; travel planning was not found to be associated with destination evaluative measures. Implications of these findings for destination managers and for researchers in the senior travel domain are considered.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 60 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Hang‐Yue Ngo and Anita Wing‐Ngar Tsang

This study evaluated the effects of two employment practices, namely work flexibility and firm internal labor markets on affective and continuance organizational…

Abstract

This study evaluated the effects of two employment practices, namely work flexibility and firm internal labor markets on affective and continuance organizational commitment. In addition, it examined whether such effects were gender‐specific. Survey data were obtained from a sample of 772 business executives in Hong Kong. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that, although the two employment practices had significant and positive effects on both affective and continuance organizational commitment, they are not affected by gender.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Michael A. Walton, Richard M. Clerkin, Robert K. Christensen, Laurie E. Paarlberg, Rebecca Nesbit and Mary Tschirhart

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the conditions associated with serving on boards by investigating the factors that distinguish older volunteers who serve…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the conditions associated with serving on boards by investigating the factors that distinguish older volunteers who serve on nonprofit boards from those who only volunteer programmatically.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys of 354 residents of Southeastern North Carolina over age 50. Measures include education, wealth, retirement status, public service motivation (PSM), patterns of residential mobility, secular and religious organization meeting attendance, and volunteer activity in the past year. Data were analyzed using a Heckman probit selection model.

Findings

Respondents who have higher levels of education, are retired, or have lived in the community for longer periods are more likely to report board volunteering, but are not any more likely to volunteer programmatically. Those with higher levels of PSM are more likely to report general volunteering, but are not any more likely to volunteer on boards. Two measures reveal divergent findings based on type of volunteering: moving frequently in one’s lifetime and attending weekly religious services are associated with a greater likelihood of programmatic volunteering but a reduced likelihood of serving as a board member.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include self-reported, cross-sectional data, and a geographically restricted American sample that is older, more educated, and more likely to own a second home than average.

Practical implications

In order to better address board member recruitment, nonprofits should consider extending opportunities through strategies targeting retired community newcomers.

Originality/value

This study contributes an analysis of PSM among nonprofit board members, and identifies factors that distinguish programmatic and board volunteers, in order to better understand the conditions associated with board service.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Obasi Haki Akan

To provide an alternative paradigm to traditional group development research in understanding how group performance is constructed through conversation by its members.

Abstract

Purpose

To provide an alternative paradigm to traditional group development research in understanding how group performance is constructed through conversation by its members.

Design/methodology/approach

In this qualitative field study, empirical data was collected on the performing stage of two work groups. Searle's speech act categories were used to analyze the conversation of group members. Using grounded theory a model is inductively constructed by examining the individual communication pieces (i.e. speech acts) and putting those pieces back together into a coherent frame.

Findings

This study proposes that during the performing stage of work group talk, a unique type of describable verbal behavior, termed concrescent conversation, is present which enables group member's ability to “contribute to task success” – being a more productive group.

Practical implications

How productive groups are is a highly relevant issue to managers in complex organizations. In the new workplace, groups are the primary work unit used to achieve business goals. Understanding how groups develop and how to improve their performance is of primary interest to managers and leaders of successful organizations.

Originality/value

What is required to make groups productive? Taking a social constructionist's perspective to this question means acknowledging the social constructionist's view that conversation helps produce reality and that group productivity is a communication‐driven phenomenon. The study explores conversation's role in one phase of Tuckman's group development model – the performing stage. The goal is to extend the understanding of group performance and to be better able to create and sustain productive groups

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Donald Haurin and Stephanie Moulton

This paper links the literatures on the life-cycle hypothesis, homeownership, home equity and pensions. Empirically, the focus is on the EU and USA. The paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper links the literatures on the life-cycle hypothesis, homeownership, home equity and pensions. Empirically, the focus is on the EU and USA. The paper aims to explore the extent that seniors extract their home equity and discuss the financial instruments available for equity extraction.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses data from the EU and USA to determine homeownership rates, house values and mortgage debt. With these values, the amount of seniors’ home equity is measured for each country. The usage of home equity extraction methods is reported and factors limiting their use are identified.

Findings

Seniors’ home equity is a substantial share of their total wealth. Estimates for 2013 are that their home equity equals about €5tn in the USA and over €8tn in large EU countries. The authors find that only a small share of seniors extracts their home equity. While there are supply side constraints in many countries, the evidence suggests that the cause of low extraction rates is the lack of demand. Various reasons for the lack of demand are discussed.

Practical implications

The increasing share of seniors in most countries’ population suggests that there will be increasing pressure on public pension systems. One among many options to address this issue is to impose a wealth test for eligibility, where wealth includes home equity. This study suggests that although home equity is substantial for many seniors, they are reluctant to access the funds.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of home equity in the EU and USA and the factors that affect the primary methods of extraction.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Randy K. Chiu, Janet S.W. Man and Jerome Thayer

Numerous studies have been conducted to test the causal relationship among role conflict, role satisfaction and stress. However, they are mostly done in the USA. Given…

Abstract

Numerous studies have been conducted to test the causal relationship among role conflict, role satisfaction and stress. However, they are mostly done in the USA. Given that Chinese culture is different from American culture, models developed in the West may not apply to the Chinese population. This study, therefore, examined the causal relationship among work conflict, family conflict, job satisfaction, marital satisfaction, life satisfaction and stress. Subjects of this study included nurses, social workers, and managers in Hong Kong. Path analysis was conducted and its result showed a good fit of the model. The findings indicate that job satisfaction and marital satisfaction experienced by the subjects were affected by work conflict and family conflict as well as inter‐role conflict. Likewise, their stress level was also influenced by life satisfaction which in turn was affected by job satisfaction and marital satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 13 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Jaroslav Mackerle

Gives a bibliographical review of the finite element methods (FEMs) applied in biomedicine from the theoretical as well as practical points of view. The bibliography at…

Abstract

Gives a bibliographical review of the finite element methods (FEMs) applied in biomedicine from the theoretical as well as practical points of view. The bibliography at the end of the paper contains 748 references to papers, conference proceedings and theses/dissertations dealing with the finite element analyses and simulations in biomedicine that were published between 1985 and 1999.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

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