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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Giuseppe Soda, Akbar Zaheer and Alessandra Carlone

Organizational networks are generally considered major antecedents of mutual influence in adopting similar practices, typically via a structure of dense ties, or closure…

Abstract

Organizational networks are generally considered major antecedents of mutual influence in adopting similar practices, typically via a structure of dense ties, or closure. We propose that under conditions of competitive interdependence, closure may be associated with links established to access resources and knowledge and become a possible source of differentiation rather than imitation. We test these and other antecedents of imitative behavior and performance in the Italian TV industry with 12 years of data on 501 productions. We find that network closure is associated with lower imitation, centrality, but not status, leads to imitation, and that imitation lowers performance.

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Network Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1442-3

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Book part
Publication date: 14 July 2014

Alberto Monti and Giuseppe Soda

Knowledge is critical for employee and firm success. We show that being perceived as prototypical organizational members is a source of prominence in knowledge exchange…

Abstract

Knowledge is critical for employee and firm success. We show that being perceived as prototypical organizational members is a source of prominence in knowledge exchange that operates beyond preexisting communication or affective relationships. Self-categorization processes produce – through depersonalization – a positive attitude among the members which represents an autonomous mechanism of social attraction for knowledge exchange, while social network mechanisms are triggered by interpersonal attraction. Our findings also suggest that including perceived members’ prototypicality can avoid a potentially spurious relationship in assessing the role played by social identity and categorization theory in explaining attitude and behaviors.

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Contemporary Perspectives on Organizational Social Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-751-1

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Two core assumptions set network theory apart from other perspectives and direct research into specific strategic and organizational topics.

Abstract

Two core assumptions set network theory apart from other perspectives and direct research into specific strategic and organizational topics.

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Network Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1442-3

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Book part
Publication date: 14 July 2014

Abstract

Details

Contemporary Perspectives on Organizational Social Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-751-1

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Abstract

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Abstract

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Network Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1442-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Erik S. Rasmussan, Tage Koed Madsen and Felicitas Evangelista

Attempts to consider how a founder has reduced equivocality in relation to support networks and reducing risks, especially in an international environment. Presents the…

Abstract

Attempts to consider how a founder has reduced equivocality in relation to support networks and reducing risks, especially in an international environment. Presents the case studies of five Danish and Australian born global companies. Considers different global models and their limitations. Presents the findings of recent surveys in this area. Concludes that internationalization has not been the primary objective in the founding process and gives direction for further research.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1900

The latest information from the magazine chemist is extremely valuable. He has dealt with milk‐adulteration and how it is done. His advice, if followed, might, however…

Abstract

The latest information from the magazine chemist is extremely valuable. He has dealt with milk‐adulteration and how it is done. His advice, if followed, might, however, speedily bring the manipulating dealer before a magistrate, since the learned writer's recipe is to take a milk having a specific gravity of 1030, and skim it until the gravity is raised to 1036; then add 20 per cent. of water, so that the gravity may be reduced to 1030, and the thing is done. The advice to serve as “fresh from the cow,” preferably in a well‐battered milk‐measure, might perhaps have been added to this analytical gem.

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British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1900

There are very few individuals who have studied the question of weights and measures who do not most strongly favour the decimal system. The disadvantages of the weights…

Abstract

There are very few individuals who have studied the question of weights and measures who do not most strongly favour the decimal system. The disadvantages of the weights and measures at present in use in the United Kingdom are indeed manifold. At the very commencement of life the schoolboy is expected to commit to memory the conglomerate mass of facts and figures which he usually refers to as “Tables,” and in this way the greater part of twelve months is absorbed. And when he has so learned them, what is the result? Immediately he leaves school he forgets the whole of them, unless he happens to enter a business‐house in which some of them are still in use; and it ought to be plain that the case would be very different were all our weights and measures divided or multiplied decimally. Instead of wasting twelve months, the pupil would almost be taught to understand the decimal system in two or three lessons, and so simple is the explanation that he would never be likely to forget it. There is perhaps no more interesting, ingenious and useful example of the decimal system than that in use in France. There the standard of length is the metre, the standard of capacity the cubic decimetre or the litre, while one cubic centimetre of distilled water weighs exactly one gramme, the standard of weight. Thus the measures of length, capacity and weight are most closely and usefully related. In the present English system there is absolutely no relationship between these weights and measures. Frequently a weight or measure bearing the same name has a different value for different bodies. Take, for instance, the stone; for dead meat its value is 8 pounds, for live meat 14 pounds; and other instances will occur to anyone who happens to remember his “Tables.” How much simpler for the business man to reckon in multiples of ten for everything than in the present confusing jumble. Mental arithmetic in matters of buying and selling would become much easier, undoubtedly more accurate, and the possibility of petty fraud be far more remote, because even the most dense could rapidly calculate by using the decimal system.

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British Food Journal, vol. 2 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1963

The Public Health (Meat) Regulations, 1924 have at last been replaced. At the time of their making, they were hailed as a great advance towards an adequate meat inspection…

Abstract

The Public Health (Meat) Regulations, 1924 have at last been replaced. At the time of their making, they were hailed as a great advance towards an adequate meat inspection service; that they have lasted for almost forty years is not an indication, however, of their success in meeting the needs of the situation. They were too much of a compromise with vested interests; the great obstacle was the private slaughterhouse and complete freedom of action by the butcher. Notices and hours of slaughter and removal of carcases were all designed to help the butcher and not the inspector. In districts with many private slaughterhouses, widely scattered, they made the work of an inspector honestly trying to inspect all animals slaughtered very hard indeed. These difficulties made certain that inspection at the time of slaughter or immediately after of all animals slaughtered for food could only be practicable in the larger centres.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 65 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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