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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Geetha M. and Gitanjali Naidu

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the attribute preferences of buyers of branded pulses and to study the differences in preferences between consumers who purchase…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the attribute preferences of buyers of branded pulses and to study the differences in preferences between consumers who purchase from traditional retail stores and those who purchase from modern retail stores.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 300 respondents (150 respondents from traditional and 150 respondents from modern retail outlet) participated in the study. Conjoint analysis was used to assess the consumers’ attribute preferences for branded pulses.

Findings

For both traditional and modern retail outlets, profile with highest utility was the profile with established brand, low price, high quality and normal packaging.

Research limitations/implications

Shoppers of traditional and modern retail outlets have similar attribute preferences for branded pulses. Hence, it can be concluded that the purchase point makes no difference in consumer attribute preferences.

Practical implications

Results indicate that in both traditional and modern retail outlet customers prefer the same profile of attributes. Two important attributes determining their purchase are also the same. Hence a company entering into the sale of branded pulses will have to focus on these two important attributes irrespective of the purchase point.

Originality/value

The topic is relatively less researched in emerging markets especially where both branded pulses and organized retail are in their nascent stages.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Bharat Mehra

This chapter presents a cultural re-interpretation of race/ethnicity and sexuality in the American academy from the perspective of a gay man originally from India settled…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter presents a cultural re-interpretation of race/ethnicity and sexuality in the American academy from the perspective of a gay man originally from India settled in the United States for more than 22 years. The reflection is based on experiences in graduate education in the United States during the closing decade of the 20th century.

Methodology/approach

The author employs a personal critical narrative, gaining insights and developing an alternative “voice” of race/ethnicity and sexuality other than what gets reported in the mainstream media and contrary to stereotyped representations. It involved resisting real and/or imagined lapses emerging in Asian-Indian contexts in areas such as ethnic gender role differentiation, heterosexism, improper academic practices, and unethical intellectual property infringement, while at the same time questioning the limitations of American gay white hegemonic dictates in a journey of self-discovery and self-growth.

Findings

The chapter identifies select strategies in the provision of information services that, had they been available during the author’s graduate education, would have better addressed (and supported) efforts to deconstruct and understand perceptions of unjust/prejudiced behaviors. The insights are meant to provide future directions to both individuals and institutions that are coping with similar needs, situations, and perceptions of people who are stuck between a rock and hard place owing to intersections in their multiple (and seemingly conflicting) identities (e.g., based on race/ethnicity and sexuality). The chapter calls for a more inclusive understanding of diversity-information-leadership intersections to better respond to the needs of such marginalized individuals and communities.

Details

Celebrating the James Partridge Award: Essays Toward the Development of a More Diverse, Inclusive, and Equitable Field of Library and Information Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-933-9

Keywords

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