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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Gina Sanders

A new refinement of employee counselling is examined — Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP), which concentrates on the explicitness of communication rather than any other…

Abstract

A new refinement of employee counselling is examined — Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP), which concentrates on the explicitness of communication rather than any other aspect. By this means the counsellor is more likely to share the real situation of the counselled and achieve a solution than by other accepted methods.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

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Abstract

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Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Bella Marckmann

This chapter argues the importance of ritualised family occasions in the moral economy of intergenerational families. The chapter draws on 34 semi-biographical interviews…

Abstract

This chapter argues the importance of ritualised family occasions in the moral economy of intergenerational families. The chapter draws on 34 semi-biographical interviews with 13 men and 21 women aged 20–90, focussing on stories about troubled or failed rituals. The analysis shows that family members depend on the support and recognition of each other to maintain their moral identities. Ritualised occasions work as magnifying glasses, focussing and intensifying the ongoing relationship work, and forcing family members to take stock and signpost the state of their social bond, and as cultural reference points, providing a window into normative expectations of how parents and adult children should perform relatedness.

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Families in Motion: Ebbing and Flowing through Space and Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-416-3

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2014

Erin Sanders-McDonagh

The purpose of this paper is to explore dirty work sites within an academic context. Working with particular “unloved” groups (Fielding, 1993) can present a number of…

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520

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore dirty work sites within an academic context. Working with particular “unloved” groups (Fielding, 1993) can present a number of challenges to researchers, and if professional boundaries are not carefully maintained, researchers can be seen as “dirty workers” within an academic context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws a qualitative research project that explores women's involvement with nationalist movements in the UK.

Findings

Researching “unloved” groups, and in particular racist organizations, presents a number of potential emotional and professional, and can render researchers “dirty workers” if clear professional boundaries are not maintained.

Originality/value

Examining academia and some academic research as a dirty work site adds to existing literature (Kreiner et al., 2006) that suggests any occupation can have a “dirty work” element that must be negotiated. This paper presents new challenges for managing spoiled “dirty” identities, and suggests that identity management is context-specific.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2008

Gina Grandy

The purpose of this paper is to explore how a group of dirty workers, that is, exotic dancers employed in a gentlemen's club, engage in identity construction amidst…

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1174

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how a group of dirty workers, that is, exotic dancers employed in a gentlemen's club, engage in identity construction amidst various macro, meso and micro considerations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a social constructivist approach in exploring the stories of a group of 21 dancers employed at a chain of exotic dancing clubs in the UK, For Your Eyes Only.

Findings

Identity construction is a complex process whereby dancers struggle to secure a positive sense of self among the various resources they encounter. The findings focus upon the processes of distancing through projecting disgust upon clients, other dancers and other clubs. Dancers do this to minimize the stigma associated with their own identities and position themselves in a more favourable light to others. In doing this, dancers construct a variety of identity roles for themselves and “others.” This process of distancing also results in the construction of a hierarchy of stigmatization whereby dancers categorize motivations for dancing, type of dancing and type of clubs to rationalize the work they perform and manage their spoiled identities.

Practical implications

The stories of these dancers illustrate the messy nature of identity construction for dirty workers. In turn, it also illuminates how a better understanding of the complexity of identity construction for exotic dancers can offer insights transferable to other dirty work occupations and organizations in general.

Originality/value

The paper provides an indepth look at an occupational site that is relatively unexplored in organization studies and thus makes a unique empirical contribution. It also offers a more comprehensive theoretical lens for understanding identity construction and dirty workers.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2015

Gina Grandy, Ruth Simpson and Sharon Mavin

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on how QROM has become an outlet that gives voice to de-valued and marginalised work/research and those who undertake it. The…

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203

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on how QROM has become an outlet that gives voice to de-valued and marginalised work/research and those who undertake it. The authors present an overview of the research published in the journal over the past ten years that has provided rich accounts of hidden and marginalised groups and experiences. The authors also summarise the unique contributions of the research covered in the special issue the authors co-edited on doing dirty research using qualitative methodologies: lesson from stigmatized occupations (volume 9, issue 3).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt a literature review approach identifying key pieces covered in QROM that surface various forms of qualitative methods employed to illuminate the everyday practices of “Other” occupations, individuals and groups; experiences situated outside of the mainstream and often hidden, devalued and stigmatised as a result.

Findings

The authors conclude that the articles published in QROM have demonstrated that in-context understandings are critically important. Such studies offer insights that are both unique and transferable to other settings. A number of invisible or hidden issues come to light in studying marginalised work/ers such as: the hidden texts, ambiguities and ambivalence which mark the experiences of those marginalised; that stigmatised work/research is embodied, emotional and reflexive; and, that expectations of reciprocity and insider-outsider complexities make the research experience rich, but sometimes uncomfortable.

Originality/value

The authors review the research published in QROM over the past ten years that contributes to understandings of work, research and experiences of those who are often de-valued, silenced and marginalised in mainstream business and management studies.

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Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Jeffrey F. Durgee, Gina Colarelli O’Connor and Robert W. Veryzer

Develops and refines a new way to generate and identify opportunities for really new product functions. Considers that the role played by marketing research in really new…

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1259

Abstract

Develops and refines a new way to generate and identify opportunities for really new product functions. Considers that the role played by marketing research in really new products is limited. Traditional marketing research methods here are largely confined to asking people about problems with current products, watching them use these products and asking them to use new prototypes in extended use tests. Describes a new method for identifying new consumer or industrial product functions. Target consumers for a given category are exposed to 300 mini‐concepts. Concepts consist of verb‐object combinations describing possible new functions in that category. Concludes that once key needs or opportunities are identified for a given category, the next step is to determine which current or new technologies are required to address these needs.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2014

Erica Southgate and Kerri Shying

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relatively hidden phenomenon of researchers who not only study dirty work but who also occupy the position of dirty workers…

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1326

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relatively hidden phenomenon of researchers who not only study dirty work but who also occupy the position of dirty workers. Drawing on the sociological debate on insider-outsider categories in research, this paper describes how these types of “dirty work/er researchers” understand and negotiate their occupational subjectivity and the methodological and epistemological resources they bring to their research practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Two biographical narratives from different types of “dirty work/er researchers” are analysed using a feminist epistemology of corporeality, social difference and power.

Findings

Ambivalence is an underlying dynamic of the narratives which indicate that the stigma attached to certain types of dirty work histories act to both facilitate and constrain research practice. Ambivalence disrupts strict binary categories often relied on in research such as insiders and outsiders, empowered and powerless and researcher and Other.

Research limitations/implications

The experiences of “dirty work/er researchers” indicate a need to reconsider ethical, methodological, epistemological issues within social research.

Practical implications

Participatory research frameworks such as peer research should pay closer attention to issues of professional status, power and risk. Further research is required on what happens after peer researchers leave the field.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the knowledge of the relatively hidden world of the “dirty work/er researcher”, their occupational experiences and the methodological and epistemological resources they bring to their job.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 3 November 2017

Graham Taylor

Abstract

Details

Understanding Brexit
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-679-2

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

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169

Abstract

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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