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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2020

Gina Grandy and Sharon Mavin

This paper aims to explore how informal and socially situated learning and gendered practices impact the experiences of women learning to lead and the gendered dynamics…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how informal and socially situated learning and gendered practices impact the experiences of women learning to lead and the gendered dynamics inherent in women’s lived experiences of learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt a becoming ontology and a social constructionist perspective. A qualitative approach guided by feminist principles facilitated the surfacing of rich and reflective accounts from women leaders. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 women leader priests in Canada.

Findings

The authors highlight how gendered practices are concealed and revealed through informal learning processes and illustrate this through two themes, informal and socially situated learning as inductive and gendered, and the jolt of gender discrimination in informal learning.

Research limitations/implications

While each account from the women church leaders is highly valued in its own right and the women’s stories have generated new insights, the overall data set is small and not generalizable. Future research should explore further the types of informal learning initiatives and systems, which acknowledge and best support women learning to lead in (gendered) organizations. It should also explore how informal learning informs leadership styles in this and other contexts.

Originality/value

The research demonstrates how informal learning experiences can serve as a site for invisible and unaccounted for gender bias and inform the becoming of women leaders. The research also advances the limited body of work that seeks to better understand the gender dynamics of women’s leadership in faith-based organizations.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2018

Teri Phillips and Gina Grandy

The purpose of this paper is to propose mindfulness (e.g. practices such as yoga, meditation) as a fruitful addition to women leader/ship development research and…

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1687

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose mindfulness (e.g. practices such as yoga, meditation) as a fruitful addition to women leader/ship development research and practice, specifically as a means through which to prevent and mitigate negative health outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a literature review-based paper that integrates scholarly research on gender and women’s leadership, well-being (including stress reduction), women leader/ship development and mindfulness.

Findings

Women continue to be under-represented in senior leadership roles and many confront a “labyrinth” of “gender-organization-system” challenges throughout their careers. These challenges can have material effects on the well-being of women leaders. Research reveals positive psychological and biological effects of mindfulness practices on well-being (including stress). Some of this research reveals that women are more likely to engage in mindfulness practices and experience greater benefits. Leader/ship development programs designed specifically for women are needed, and it is proposed that incorporating mindfulness into these programs may result in beneficial outcomes for women leaders.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the limited body of work on women leader/ship development, mindfulness and leadership.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 September 2020

Gina Grandy, Wendy Cukier and Suzanne Gagnon

This paper aims to extend Lewis and Simpson’s (2010) work on the complexity of (in)visibility and explores what it means to women’s entrepreneurship in Canada during the…

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2086

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to extend Lewis and Simpson’s (2010) work on the complexity of (in)visibility and explores what it means to women’s entrepreneurship in Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

This piece contributes to the special issue on COVID-19 and the impact on women entrepreneurs. Specifically, it applies an (in)visibility lens to argue that responses to COVID-19 in Canada negatively affect women entrepreneurs disproportionately and that while initiatives such as the Women Entrepreneurship Knowledge Hub (WEKH) are threatened, they can also serve as an agitator during this time to advocate for an inclusive recovery approach.

Findings

Despite progress through such government funded initiatives as the Women Entrepreneurship Strategy (WES), which is targeting more than $2bn (Cdn) in investments towards women entrepreneurs, structural inequality and the (in)visibility of women’s entrepreneurship has been amplified during COVID-19. Through a particular understanding of the (in)visibility vortex notion (Lewis and Simpson, 2010), it is concluded the (in)visibility of women entrepreneurs as deeply embedded and that there is a continued need to advocate for a gender and diversity lens, to ensure inclusive recovery that benefits women and diverse entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

An (in)visibility lens brings an important addition to the literature on women’s entrepreneurship, as well as illuminates the important differences within this broad category, deepening the understanding of these trends and their impact during COVID-19 pandemic. It highlights how the complexities of intersectionality are critical to understand, and their recognition can help to drive a clear evidence base, as well as advocacy. The piece call researchers and practitioners alike to consider the question under COVID-19, will these conditions create a new vortex in this domain, or can the work of organizations and researchers position gender and intersectionality in women entrepreneurship as a disrupter for the future?

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Gina Grandy and Daphne Rixon

Ben Chang, the CEO of a small credit union, Neighbourhood Credit Union (Neighbourhood), located in Atlantic Canada was evaluating a possible merger with another larger…

Abstract

Synopsis

Ben Chang, the CEO of a small credit union, Neighbourhood Credit Union (Neighbourhood), located in Atlantic Canada was evaluating a possible merger with another larger credit union, Pleasantview Credit Union (Pleasantview). Chang and Neighbourhood’s Board of Directors (Board) were interested in a merger that would enhance member benefits via improved technology, innovative delivery channels and a more robust financial planning and wealth management capability. Chang, along with a team of experts, was methodical in seeking out interested credit unions. Pleasantview emerged as a strong candidate from the expression of interest stage. The initial due diligence review was complete, the memorandum of understanding signed and a working group comprised of members from both credit unions formed. Chang, however, was becoming increasingly concerned about the lack of strategic fit between Neighbourhood and Pleasantview. In conversation with the consultant hired to assist with the merger process, Chang was considering recommending to the Board that the merger process with Pleasantview be halted. It was January 2015 and Chang was set to retire in May. Before he retired he wanted a plan in place that ensured increased member benefits, as well one that balanced growth and sustainability for Neighbourhood. Chang was scheduled to meet with the Board in four days. He needed a recommendation that would address the current merger situation, as well as provide other options for Neighbourhood.

Research methodology

This case is based upon primary and secondary data collection. Formal and follow-up informal interviews were conducted in 2015 with the CEO and “merger” consultant at Neighbourhood Credit Union. Organisational documents and publicly available documents were also consulted. To ensure the confidentiality terms of the merger discussions, the case is disguised with respect to the name and location of the credit unions, the names of the CEO and consultant, as well as the financials. The timeline, process followed, key decision and opinions of the CEO and merger consultant as presented in the case are real.

Relevant courses and levels

This case is formulated for university undergraduate students in their third or fourth years of study and graduate students. It is appropriate for strategic management and co-operative/not-for-profit management classes intended for a 60–75 min class session.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2021

Lilith Arevshatian Whiley and Gina Grandy

The authors explore how service workers negotiate emotional laboring with “dirty” emotions while trying to meet the demands of neoliberal healthcare. In doing so, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors explore how service workers negotiate emotional laboring with “dirty” emotions while trying to meet the demands of neoliberal healthcare. In doing so, the authors theorize emotional labor in the context of healthcare as a type of embodied and emotional “dirty” work.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) to their data collected from National Health Service (NHS) workers in the United Kingdom (UK).

Findings

The authors’ data show that healthcare service workers absorb, contain and quarantine emotional “dirt”, thereby protecting their organization at a cost to their own well-being. Workers also perform embodied practices to try to absolve themselves of their “dirty” labor.

Originality/value

The authors extend research on emotional “dirty” work and theorize that emotional labor can also be conceptualized as “dirty” work. Further, the authors show that emotionally laboring with “dirty” emotions is an embodied phenomenon, which involves workers absorbing and containing patients' emotional “dirt” to protect the institution (at the expense of their well-being).

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Sandra Corlett and Sharon Mavin

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Special Issue developed from a joint research seminar of the Gender in Management and Identity Special Interest Groups of the…

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2915

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Special Issue developed from a joint research seminar of the Gender in Management and Identity Special Interest Groups of the British Academy of Management, entitled “Exploring the Intersectionality of Gender and Identity”. It also presents an introductory literature review of intersectionality for gender in management and identity/identity work researchers. The authors highlight the similarities and differences of intersectionality and identity approaches and introduce critiques of intersectional research. They then introduce the three papers in this Special Issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review the intersectionality literature within and outside management and organisation studies and focus their attention on three intersectionality Special Issues (Sex Roles, 2008, 2013 and the European Journal of Women’s Studies, 2006).

Findings

The authors outline the ongoing debates relating to intersectionality research, including a framework and/or theory for identity/identity work, and explore the shared tenets of theories of intersectionality and identity. They highlight critiques of intersectionality research in practice and consider areas for future research for gender in management and identity researchers.

Research limitations/implications

The authors provide an architecture for researchers to explore intersectionality and to consider issues before embarking on intersectional research. They also highlight areas for future research, including social-identities of disability, class and religion.

Originality/value

Gender in Management: An International Journal invited this Special Issue to make a significant contribution to an under-researched area by reviewing the shared and different languages and importantly the shared key tenets, of intersectionality, gender, identity and identity work from a multidisciplinary perspective.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Gina Grandy, Patricia Lewis and Sharon Mavin

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320

Abstract

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 April 2020

Gina Grandy

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216

Abstract

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal , vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Content available

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Sharon Mavin and Gina Grandy

The purpose of this paper is to revisit theoretical positions on gender and the implications for gender in management by building upon current research on doing gender…

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4137

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to revisit theoretical positions on gender and the implications for gender in management by building upon current research on doing gender well (or appropriately in congruence with sex category) and re‐doing or undoing gender and argue that gender can be done well and differently through simultaneous, multiple enactments of femininity and masculinity.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a theoretical paper.

Findings

The authors argue that individuals can perform exaggerated expressions of femininity (or masculinity) while simultaneously performing alternative expressions of femininity or masculinity. The authors question claims that gender can be undone and incorporate sex category into their understanding of doing gender – it cannot be ignored in experiences of doing gender. The authors contend that the binary divide constrains and restricts how men and women do gender but it can be disrupted or unsettled.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses upon the implications of doing gender well and differently, for gender and management research and practice, drawing upon examples of leadership, entrepreneurship, female misogyny and Queen Bee.

Originality/value

This paper offers a conceptualization of doing gender that acknowledges the gender binary, while also suggesting possibilities of unsettling it.

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