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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Mohammad Tayeenul Hoque, Mohammad Faisal Ahammad, Nikolaos Tzokas and Gillie Gabay

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework on the dimensions of dynamic marketing capability (DMC) and its relationship with export performance. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework on the dimensions of dynamic marketing capability (DMC) and its relationship with export performance. The paper also proposes the mediating role of competitive hybrid strategy and the moderating role of environmental responsiveness in explaining the relationship between DMC and export performance.

Design/methodology/approach

By following the dynamic capability notion of the marketing and competitive strategy literature, this paper proposes a novel conceptualization of the DMC development process and the possible effect of DMC on attaining competitive advantage.

Findings

The paper postulates that a firm’s DMC can reflect complementary power when its higher-level marketing capabilities are bundled together to detect distributing channel members’ crucial needs, competitors’ action plans and satisfying market demand. As yet little is known about the main underlying dimensions of higher-level DMC construct, the paper contributes in proposing the key dimensions of DMC.

Originality/value

This research advances the knowledge-based view and resource-based views and evolves a solid foundation of DMC constructs comprising four higher-order marketing capabilities, namely, ambidextrous market orientation, customer relationship management capability, brand management capability and new product development capability. Thus, this paper contributes in DMC literature in explaining export performance.

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Gillie Gabay and Howard R. Moskowitz

The expected growth of elders and chronically ill patients requires health insurers and health-care systems to shift from primarily focusing on the care of the sick to…

Abstract

The expected growth of elders and chronically ill patients requires health insurers and health-care systems to shift from primarily focusing on the care of the sick to focusing both on care of the sick and on preventive health care. Public expectations for high-quality health care call for a new, more profound, and more actionable understanding of the healthy customer’s mind regarding health-promoting behaviors. Mind-Genomics may become the next big idea in health service. The relation between Mind-Genomics and data-driven personalized health plans is now being systematically explored. Some of the findings are reported in this research project.

Methodology: Respondents were 200 members of the Excellus American health fund. Based on measures of patient experience the authors created and tested concepts of messaging. The authors conducted a series of conjoint-based designed experiments to establish response patterns to our messaging. The authors analyzed data using Mind-Genomics, an empirical “micro-science” for discovering psychographic mind-sets and mapping motivating messages for healthy behaviors.

Results: The authors segmented patients by attitudes, perceptions, preferences, needs, and behaviors by their responses to messaging, thereby uncovering underlying psychographic mind-sets. The authors used the Personal Viewpoint Identifier to tag each person in the population by a sample mind-set and use the right messaging.

Discussion: To understand the mind of the patient regarding health plans, health funds may use the powerful tools of Mind-Genomics. Health insurers and health systems may implement Mind-Genomics as the next frontier of knowledge development to offer customized health plans, thus investing in preventive medicine.

Details

The Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives of Management: Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-249-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Gillie Gabay, Laurent Flores, Howard Moskowitz and Andrea Maier

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a concept‐response segmentation used to identify different customer “mind‐sets”. Based on this segmentation, in a merchandising…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a concept‐response segmentation used to identify different customer “mind‐sets”. Based on this segmentation, in a merchandising situation, one can interact with the customer to identify the segment to which the customer belongs and in turn offer the proper product and merchandising.

Design/methodology/approach

The study deals with the creation of new hair products, using both ideation by brand Delphi™ and by experimental design of ideas with conjoint measurement (IdeaMap.Net). It ends with the creation of a merchandising product for hair coloring based on concept segmentation. First the internet was used to facilitate the acquisition and prioritization of new ideas. Then the experimental design of ideas was used to identify which perform well in the body of test concepts.

Findings

Three segments were identified: Segment 1 (54 percent) wants easy to use, high technology, and reliable products. Segment 2 (25 percent) wants to give, and get information about themselves, with respect to hair coloring. Furthermore, they want to make information giving/getting a process, not simply a rapid 1‐2‐3 affair. Segment 3 (21 percent) wants results. They want information, primarily what the product will do for them, what it delivers.

Research limitations/implications

The innovative research deals with the creation of “new to the world” product ideas and the segmentation of respondents into different groups, based on their mind‐sets.

Practical implications

The segmentation results provide the manufacturer and the trade with an opportunity to fine‐tune the development of the new product and its merchandising. One of the recurring questions, however, is how to find these segments in the population? Data mining works by searching for assignment rules that put people into the segments based on a decision rule. The variables used by the decision rule come from external information about the respondent, which the respondent may have provided previously, or patterns of purchases that the individual may have made over time. The objective is to increase the chances of correctly classifying a new individual as a member of one of the three segments, and by so doing present the prospect with a better offer, whether an improved product or shopping experience.

Originality/value

The study deals with the creation of new hair products, using both ideation by brand Delphi™ and by experimental design of ideas with conjoint measurement (IdeaMap.Net). This is a discussion towards high tech in merchandising haircoloring products. It examines new opportunities for development.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Sandy Guardiola, Gillie Gabay and Howard R. Moskowitz

The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of consumer preferences and mind‐set regarding the transition to using renewable energy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of consumer preferences and mind‐set regarding the transition to using renewable energy.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach taken is an experimental design of messaging (conjoint analysis).

Findings

The study uncovered different segments of individuals, with different mind‐sets, needing different types of messaging. Results show what marketing messages might best work to interest consumers in the transition to renewable energy. The study revealed two different mind‐set segments among respondents. The first segment comprised residents who preferred a gradual transition toward using 80 percent renewable energy, and 20 percent conventional energy, with no specific transition time span, and with no tax increases. The second segment comprised residents who preferred a five year, fixed‐time plan for the conversion to renewable energy sources (RES), along with service plans, and an accompanying “money back” guarantee.

Research limitations/implications

The study did not include the testing of pricing elements to the messaging about the transition to “green” process. Thus, insights concerning the interaction of financial concerns with mind‐sets in the transition to “green” are yet to be studied.

Practical implications

After identifying the segment to which each individual belongs, data permit the creation of a “typing tool” to identify segment membership, thus allowing more targeted and effective messaging when building awareness and demand for green power.

Originality/value

This is a pioneering study that looks at the “mind” of the customer, to investigate how different ideas and messaging drive the consumer's comfort level regarding the use of RES, and the future of their energy consumption and transitional needs. This is a multi‐disciplinary study incorporating public policy and marketing together with practical application.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Abstract

Details

The Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives of Management: Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-249-2

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

Gillie Gabay, Howard R. Moskowitz, Jacqueline Beckley and Hollis Ashman

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test the consumer‐centered approach to brand management theorized by Rust, Zeithaml and Lemon in 2004 to assist companies in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically test the consumer‐centered approach to brand management theorized by Rust, Zeithaml and Lemon in 2004 to assist companies in reducing the depreciation of brand equity.

Design/methodology/approach

Brand equity was operationalized in the context of conjoint measurement. In total, 5,364 respondents participated in interviews testing drivers of brand equity for six brands each in 28 food categories.

Findings

Data from the large‐scale study revealed that across categories brand value may not hold much beyond the name in the minds of consumers. It was found that mindset segmentation may be a basis for brand management. Messages that focused on product functionality were found to be stronger drivers of preference of one brand over another. Product features instead of brand names emerged as the primary source of value across segments.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on brands in the food industry requiring the replication to additional industries.

Practical implications

It was found that brands did not hold much beyond their name. Companies holding strong brands will need to define product features in terms of their perceived functionality across consumer segments. Companies are to build and position brands around customer segments.

Originality/value

A cutting edge methodology to test mindset segmentation by combinations of product features as a new basis for brand management was used. In contrast to traditional brand management which is based on products, the paper bases brand management on consumer needs highlighting consumer equity rather than brand equity.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 February 2015

Abstract

Details

International Best Practices in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-278-4

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