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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Elaine Beaumont, Gillian Rayner, Mark Durkin and Gosia Bowling

The purpose of this paper is to examine pre and post outcome measures following a course of Compassionate Mind Training (CMT). Participants were students enrolled on a Post…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine pre and post outcome measures following a course of Compassionate Mind Training (CMT). Participants were students enrolled on a Post Graduate Diploma in Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapy (CBP). The aim of the research was to explore whether CMT would increase self-compassion, compassion for others, dispositional empathy and reduce self-critical judgement.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 21 participants who had enrolled on the CBP programme took part in the study. Data were collected using the self-compassion scale, interpersonal reactivity index, and the compassion for others scale.

Findings

Results reveal an overall statistically significant increase in self-compassion scores and statistically significant reduction in self-critical judgement scores post training. There was no statistically significant difference post training on the interpersonal reactivity index or the compassion for others scale.

Research limitations/implications

CMT training may help students develop healthy coping strategies, which they can use to balance their affect regulation systems when faced with organisational, placement, client, academic, personal and supervision demands. Further research and longitudinal studies, using larger sample sizes are needed to explore if cultivating compassion whilst on psychotherapy training helps students build resilience and provide a barrier against empathic distress fatigue, compassion fatigue, secondary traumatic stress, and burnout.

Practical implications

Incorporating CMT into a CBP programme may bring changes in student levels of self-compassion and self-critical judgement.

Originality/value

This inaugural study examines whether incorporating CMT into a CBP programme impacts on students levels of compassion, dispositional empathy and self-critical judgement. The findings from this preliminary study suggest the potential benefits of training students in compassion focused practices.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2023

Gary Lamph, Alison Elliott, Sue Wheatcroft, Gillian Rayner, Kathryn Gardner, Michael Haslam, Emma Jones, Mick McKeown, Jane Gibbon, Nicola Graham-Kevan and Karen Wright

The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of a novel offender personality disorder (OPD) higher education programme and the research evaluation results collected over a…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of a novel offender personality disorder (OPD) higher education programme and the research evaluation results collected over a three-year period. Data from Phase 1 was collected from a face-to-face mode of delivery, and Phase 2 data collected from the same programme was from an online mode of delivery because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

In Phase 1, three modules were developed and delivered in a fully face-to-face format before the pandemic in 2019–2020 (n = 52 student participants). In 2020–2021 (n = 66 student participants), training was adapted into a fully online mode of delivery in Phase 2. This mixed-methods study evaluated participant confidence and compassion. Pre-, post- and six-month follow-up questionnaires were completed. Qualitative interviews were conducted across both phases to gain in-depth feedback on this programme (Phase 1: N = 7 students, Phase 2: N = 2 students, N = 5 leaders). Data from Phase 1 (face-to-face) and Phase 2 (online) are synthesised for comparison.

Findings

In Phase 1 (N = 52), confidence in working with people with personality disorder or associated difficulties improved significantly, while compassion did not change. In Phase 2 (N = 66), these results were replicated, with statistically significant improvements in confidence reported. Compassion, however, was reduced in Phase 2 at the six-month follow-up. Results have been integrated and have assisted in shaping the future of modules to meet the learning needs of students.

Research limitations/implications

Further research into the impact of different modes of delivery is important for the future of education in a post-pandemic digitalised society. Comparisons of blended learning approaches were not covered but would be beneficial to explore and evaluate in the future.

Practical implications

This comparison provided informed learning for consideration in the development of non-related educational programmes and, hence, was of use to other educational providers.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comparison of a student-evaluated training programme, thus providing insights into the impact of delivering a relational-focused training programme in both face-to-face and online distance learning delivery modes. From this pedagogic research evaluation, the authors were able to derive unique insights into the outcomes of this programme.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Celeste Foster, Lynsey Birch, Shelly Allen and Gillian Rayner

The purpose of this paper is to outline a UK-based interdisciplinary workforce development project that had the aim of improving service delivery for children and young people who…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline a UK-based interdisciplinary workforce development project that had the aim of improving service delivery for children and young people who self-harm or are feeling suicidal.

Design/methodology/approach

This innovative practice-higher-education partnership utilised an iterative consultation process to establish the local workforce need and then facilitated the systematic synthesis and presentation of evidence-based clinical guidelines in a practical format, for staff working directly with young people who self-harm in non-mental health settings.

Findings

The development, content and structure of this contextualised resource is presented, along with emerging outcomes and learning from the team. It is anticipated that this may also be a useful strategy and resource for other teams in other areas and is intended to provide a template that can be adapted by other localities to meet the specific needs of their own workforce.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates how higher education-practice partnerships can make clinical guidelines and research evidence in a field often thought of as highly specialist, accessible to all staff. It also shows a process of liaison and enhanced understanding across universal/specialist mental health service thresholds.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates how collaborative partnerships can work to bridge the gap between evidence-based guidelines and their implementation in practice, through innovative multi-agency initiatives.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2018

Tara Brabazon, Steve Redhead and Runyararo S. Chivaura

Abstract

Details

Trump Studies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-779-9

Book part
Publication date: 1 October 2013

Maya K. Gislason

A crucial contemporary public health issue is the construction and contestation of the relevance of the natural world to human health.

Abstract

Purpose

A crucial contemporary public health issue is the construction and contestation of the relevance of the natural world to human health.

Approach

Taking a critical approach, this chapter examines how the natural environment as a health determinant is positioned in relation to the ‘social’ within social theory generally and social epidemiological studies of health, illness and disease specifically.

Findings

– This study shows how current constructions of social and natural environmental health drivers contour social approaches to the study of health and proposes an integrated social-ecological approach for generating new contributions of social epidemiology to research on environmentally driven health injuries.

Originality

– The research breaks ground for further social scientific studies of health and the environment and in particular substantiates the call for an extended notion of the ‘environment’ using ecological principles. Methodologically, the interdisciplinary reach of this research draws attention to the tensions that arise when working across the medical, natural and social sciences.

Details

Ecological Health: Society, Ecology and Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-323-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Stuart Hannabuss

The management of children′s literature is a search for value andsuitability. Effective policies in library and educational work arebased firmly on knowledge of materials, and on…

Abstract

The management of children′s literature is a search for value and suitability. Effective policies in library and educational work are based firmly on knowledge of materials, and on the bibliographical and critical frame within which the materials appear and might best be selected. Boundaries, like those between quality and popular books, and between children′s and adult materials, present important challenges for selection, and implicit in this process are professional acumen and judgement. Yet also there are attitudes and systems of values, which can powerfully influence selection on grounds of morality and good taste. To guard against undue subjectivity, the knowledge frame should acknowledge the relevance of social and experiential context for all reading materials, how readers think as well as how they read, and what explicit and implicit agendas the authors have. The good professional takes all these factors on board.

Details

Library Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Margaret Procter

The phased implementation of the UK Freedom of Information (FoI) Act means that higher education will be one of the last parts of the public sector to be affected by the…

1862

Abstract

The phased implementation of the UK Freedom of Information (FoI) Act means that higher education will be one of the last parts of the public sector to be affected by the legislation. In an environment where records management (RM) is not a generally recognised function, the implications of compliance may not be fully realised. This article examines the reasons for a growing awareness of RM issues within the higher education environment, work that has already been done in this area, and explains how a combination of factors is raising the profile of RM, leading to increased job opportunities. It considers the development of a sector‐specific Model Action Plan for FoI Code of Practice compliance, noting some of the issues that need particular attention.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1959

It is not often nowadays that food and drugs cases get headline news or present new and interesting features. They tend towards a monotonous routine, of which analysts and…

Abstract

It is not often nowadays that food and drugs cases get headline news or present new and interesting features. They tend towards a monotonous routine, of which analysts and inspectors sometimes complain, and new case law seems to belong to the past, although Edwards v. Llaethdy Merion Ltd. and Southworth v. Whitewell Dairies Ltd., clarifying the law relating to “foreign bodies” in food and a few other cases have illuminated the food and drugs firmament in recent years. The recent “Mushroom Soup” case brought by the West Sussex County Council at Chichester, however, attracted a great deal of publicity and without presenting any new law, did in fact illustrate in an interesting manner certain well‐worn legal principles. In particular, it showed the tardiness of Courts to confer upon “general terms”—in the case in question, the general term “mushroom”—a narrower and more specific meaning that general usage allows. To construe general terms in a general sense is a principle as old as Equity itself and in ruling that Boletus edulis was properly described as mushroom, the Court merely followed the usage of people in the country areas where mushrooms grow of including in the term a number of edible varieties, with no clear definition other than that shall be edible. As well as the home‐grown varieties, in the rapidly growing foreign communities of our big seaports and cities, there are other edible varieties, unknown in this country.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 61 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Margee Hume and Gillian Sullivan Mort

Organizations must base success on consumer retention predicated on the consumer's desire to repurchase. Some organizations, such as those providing emotionally charged and…

11942

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations must base success on consumer retention predicated on the consumer's desire to repurchase. Some organizations, such as those providing emotionally charged and complex services in the performing arts, find this difficult. Knowledge of the role of emotions in customer judgments is negligible. The relationship of core service quality and peripheral quality on repurchase intent is also understudied. This paper aims to model and test the interrelationship of these constructs in predicting repurchase intention in a performing arts context.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument tailored to the performing arts was administered to a sample of 250 past and present performing arts audience members, with responses examined using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results indicate repurchase intention is largely based on satisfaction mediated by perceived value. Core service quality, appraisal emotion and peripheral service quality influence perceived value for time and money, with core service quality and peripheral service quality in turn influencing appraisal emotion. Appraisal emotion directly affects customer satisfaction but has no direct relationship to repurchase intention. Peripheral service quality, however, directly affects repurchase intention.

Practical implications

Evidence suggests expansion of the strategic focus to include peripheral services in order to maximize repurchase. Core service quality, (the act) affects repurchase intent through an indirect path mediated by appraisal emotion, which does not directly influence repurchase intent. Appraisal emotions are influential in determining perceived value.

Originality/value

This is the first known paper combining this system of relationships including the influence and role of appraisal emotion in the performing arts context.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Linda Evans

154

Abstract

Details

International Journal for Researcher Development, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2048-8696

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