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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Zhiying Lian and Gillian Oliver

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of information culture in Mainland China and apply the information culture framework to an organizational setting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of information culture in Mainland China and apply the information culture framework to an organizational setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The foundation for the research is provided by a review of Chinese and English language literature and a case study of a university library was conducted, involving semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The information culture framework facilitated identification of factors not recognized in previous information culture research, including uniquely Chinese factors of egocentrism, guanxi (relationships), mianzi (face), hexie (harmony) and renqing (mutual benefit). A further finding highlighted the profound differences between archives and library institutions in China.

Originality/value

The paper provides the first step toward further exploring features of Chinese organizational culture which will not only influence information management practices but also highlight the issues relating to collaboration between libraries and archives in China.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2019

Viviane Frings-Hessami, Anindita Sarker, Gillian Oliver and Misita Anwar

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the creation and sharing of information by Bangladeshi women participants in a community informatics project and to assess to what…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the creation and sharing of information by Bangladeshi women participants in a community informatics project and to assess to what extent the information provided to them meets their short and longer-term needs.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on data collected during a workshop with village women in Dhaka and focus group discussions in rural Bangladesh in March and April 2019. The information continuum model is used as a framework to analyse the data.

Findings

The study shows that the women document their learning and share it with their families and communities and that they are very conscious of the importance of keeping analogue back-ups of the information provided to them in digital format. They use notebooks to write down information that they find useful and they copy information provided to them on brown paper sheets hung in the village community houses.

Practical implications

This paper raises questions about how information is communicated to village women, organised and integrated in a community informatics project, and more generally about the suitability and sustainability of providing information in digital formats in a developing country.

Originality/value

The paper shows how village women participants in a community informatics project in Bangladesh took the initiative to create and preserve the information that was useful to them in analogue formats to remedy the limitations of the digital formats and to keep the information accessible in the longer term.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Chern Li Liew, Gillian Oliver and Morgan Watkins

The relatively under-documented “dark side” of participatory activities facilitated by memory institutions through social media is examined in this study. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

The relatively under-documented “dark side” of participatory activities facilitated by memory institutions through social media is examined in this study. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the risks and perception of risks resulting from using social media for public engagement and participation.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with fourteen representatives from the New Zealand information and cultural heritage sector who at the time of the study were holding the main responsibilities of overseeing the social media and participatory activities of the institutions they represented.

Findings

It is not evident that the growth of social web has significantly changed the way the heritage sector seeks participation. Only a small minority of the sample institutions appear to be using social web tools to build community and to enhance their heritage collections. For the majority, institutional use of social media is for creating a “chattering space”. The main concerns identified by interviewees were reputation management and the risk management process followed by most institutions appeared to be reactive, responding to problems as and when they occurred, rather than proactive about risk identification and avoidance.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are not generalisable as the sample size of thirteen institutions is relatively small and is limited to one national context.

Originality/value

Findings provide insight into largely unexplored issues relating to the development of participatory cultures by memory institutions. The paper highlights a key area where further research is needed, namely to explore whether participatory heritage should primarily be about curated viewpoints or whether it should encompass capturing living dialogues, even when conversations are potentially offensive.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2018

Gillian Oliver, Fiorella Foscarini, Craigie Sinclair, Catherine Nicholls and Lydia Loriente

The purpose of this paper is to report on the application of information culture analysis techniques in the workplace. The paper suggests that records managers should use…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the application of information culture analysis techniques in the workplace. The paper suggests that records managers should use ethnographic sensitivity, if they want to have a constructive dialogue with records creators and users, and effect positive change in their organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

Two pilot studies were conducted in university settings for the purpose of testing an information culture assessment toolkit. The university records managers who carried out the investigation approached the fieldwork ethnographically, in the sense that they were interested in the perspectives of their end users, and tried to understand their information cultures, rather than imposing their recordkeeping concepts and procedures.

Findings

Information culture analysis was of practical utility in large complex organisations, providing an insight into behaviours, motivations, and most importantly promoted reflection and dialogue among organisational actors.

Originality/value

The paper raises awareness of the diversity of professional skills and knowledge required by records practitioners. It emphasises that to remain relevant to their organisations, records managers have to be receptive and sensitive to cultural influences.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Library Review, vol. 59 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Marek Deja

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the problem of information and knowledge management (IKM) in higher education institutions. The research aims to determine the way…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the problem of information and knowledge management (IKM) in higher education institutions. The research aims to determine the way in which the knowledge resources of a higher education institution are managed. The author intends to define how the information system is shaped and how information and knowledge are used in the reporting processes and for decision-making efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 38 university administration employees from six higher education institutions in Poland participated in the study. Information barriers and benefits resulting from the implementation of the central reporting system “POL-on” were identified by using the sense-making technique. The purpose of the interviews was to determine the procedural and behavioural conditions of the reporting and decision-making processes in higher education institutions in Poland.

Findings

This paper suggests four characteristics of IKM in higher education institutions. A link between the information culture of the institution, its size and structure as well as the adopted model of IKM is demonstrated.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper is to introduce a framework for studying the IKM in higher education institutions from the perspective of information culture. Higher education institutions have developed different styles of striving for efficiency regarding decision making and reporting in administration. The IM and KM are now proved to be an integrated process in administrative activities of higher education institutions.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 43 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

Gillian Oliver

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that implementation strategies for ISO 15489 need to be tailored to suit organisations, taking into account their unique

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that implementation strategies for ISO 15489 need to be tailored to suit organisations, taking into account their unique features as well as the broader cultural environment, including societal legislative and standards frameworks.

Design/methodology/approach

Three different organisational settings are described and compared in the paper.

Findings

The paper finds that strategies for implementation of international standards should be devised accordingly to suit different information cultures.

Practical implications

Successful implementation of international standards is more likely if the cultural characteristics of the organisation are understood.

Originality/value

This research will assist in promoting best practice in records management.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Gillian Oliver

Abstract

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2010

Gillian Oliver

Abstract

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Gillian Oliver

Abstract

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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