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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Gillian Lees

Enterprise governance is an emerging concept which emphasizes the importance of balancing the corporate governance and performance management aspects of the organization…

Abstract

Enterprise governance is an emerging concept which emphasizes the importance of balancing the corporate governance and performance management aspects of the organization. In the light of recent corporate scandals, there has been considerable pressure worldwide to improve standards of corporate governance through new codes of best practice and legislation. While necessary, there is a danger that with so much attention on control issues, the need for companies to create long‐term wealth and to pursue the right strategies to achieve this is overlooked. Research has shown that a particular challenge for boards is to maintain effective oversight of the company’s strategic position and progress. In response to this “gap” in oversight, The Chartered Institute of Management Accountants has developed a strategic scorecard. The scorecard is currently under development but is introduced here as a potentially valuable strategic management framework.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Abstract

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Emma Killbery Wilkinson, Amanda Lees, Sarah Weekes, Gillian Duncan, Geoffrey Meads and Kit Tapson

In 2019, St Johns Winchester, a CQC-registered charity, launched the Hand in Hand (HiH) Service, a social prescribing (SP) initiative to alleviate social…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2019, St Johns Winchester, a CQC-registered charity, launched the Hand in Hand (HiH) Service, a social prescribing (SP) initiative to alleviate social isolation/loneliness amongst older people via integration between primary care and the third sector. Arising from collaborative stakeholder reflection, this article explicates processes instigated to plan, implement and evaluate the HiH service which has been locally recognised as an exemplar of good practice. It aims to fill a gap in the literature which has hitherto lacked contextual description of the drivers, mechanisms and processes of SP schemes, leading to confusion over what constitutes SP and which models can work.

Design/methodology/approach

The article defines the context of, drivers for and collaborative process followed to implement and evaluate HiH and reflects on challenges, facilitators and key points for transferable learning. Early evaluation findings are presented.

Findings

Key features underpinning the success of the pilot phase were: having clear referral pathways, working collaboratively with health and voluntary sector partners, building relationships based on trust, adherence to high-quality standards and governance, a well-trained team of volunteers and access to up-to-date information source. There remains a disparity between the urgent need for rigorous evaluation data and the resources available to produce it.

Originality/value

The article offers a novel contribution for those planning SP at the level of practice and policy and for the developing field of SP evaluation.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Jessica Lees, Louisa Remedios, Inosha Bimali, Carolyn Cracknell, Gillian Webb, Josefine Teckelborg, Rahul Kalia and Srijana Gautam

In this chapter, the authors will discuss the global learning partnership (GLP), which is an innovative and evidence-informed model of experiential learning for health…

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors will discuss the global learning partnership (GLP), which is an innovative and evidence-informed model of experiential learning for health professional students. The model is based on partnerships between universities to promote the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) agenda.

The GLP is a placement opportunity for an inter-professional cohort of visiting and local students and academics, designed as an action-orientated, community engagement learning experience focused on addressing community health and well-being needs (Goal 3). Consistent with the SDGs, strong partnerships (Goal 17) are essential to lasting impact.

The aim of developing the GLP was to design, implement, and trial a new model of global placement that was sustainable, capacity building, and a genuine learning opportunity for local and international health science students, driven by the agenda to increase learning about and action on the SDGs. This model was designed to harness the strengths of existing educational frameworks recognized for the beneficial learning opportunities they provide; inter-professional learning; learning from and with communities with SDG needs; and with a three-week immersion component for building cultural competency.

In addition to focusing on the SDG agenda, the GLP is unique in drawing on the knowledge and skills of local students and academics in educating the visiting students to work in geopolitically and socioculturally complex community setting building, as visitors learn from both local students and the local community about best practice.

This chapter will provide discussion of the theoretical framework underpinning the model design and draw on the student and academic experience. Practice details are also provided to allow educators in other organizations to replicate the partnership model.

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Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Abstract

Details

University Partnerships for Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-643-4

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Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Louisa Remedios, Jessica Lees, Carolyn Cracknell, Victoria Burns, Manuel Perez-Jimenez, Alejandro Banegas-Lagos, Susanne Brokop and Gillian Webb

The importance of knowledge regarding the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is universally recognized, but less commonly actualized in health…

Abstract

The importance of knowledge regarding the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is universally recognized, but less commonly actualized in health professional curricula. This chapter examines how SDG awareness has been embedded into curricula and extra-curricula activity in four different University settings: The University of Melbourne (Australia); Tecnologico de Monterrey (Mexico); Lund University (Sweden); and the University of Birmingham (United Kingdom). It is informed by the work of academics representing single health disciplines from the four universities. All academics are actively involved with the Universitas 21 Health Science Group (U21HSG) SDG strategic group. The chapter will outline shared and unique projects that are directed at increasing students awareness for targeted action to achieve the global goals.

With a crowded curriculum, lack of SDG expertise and a belief that health professional learning should focus on a single goal (Goal 3: Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages), there are significant challenges to growing SDG relevant knowledge and skills within existing programs. We provide examples of how these challenges were met, such as through the development of SDG learning outcomes to fit within a physiotherapy curriculum renewal and the running and management of service learning refugee clinics by medical students. We will briefly examine our key learning and make recommendations on providing SDG relevant learning opportunities for students. The chapter will provoke and challenge the reader to consider how they are addressing the sustainability goals and how they can overcome perceived barriers to educating students for a sustainable world.

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Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Enakshi Sengupta, Patrick Blessinger and Tasir Subhi Yamin

The aim of sustainable development goals (SDGs) announced in 2015 by United Nations was to ensure that all students and scholars are being able to acquire knowledge and…

Abstract

The aim of sustainable development goals (SDGs) announced in 2015 by United Nations was to ensure that all students and scholars are being able to acquire knowledge and skills needed to promote sustainable development. The role of higher education is important when it comes to educating students in sustainability and sustainable developments. Universities can have a great influence on achieving social and economic progress of a country as well as protecting the environment and addressing complex issues that plague society. The role of universities is not only restricted to exchange of knowledge but also in playing a leading role as an active member of society. Universities have come out of their isolation to accommodate and be a part of social change and actively engage in community’s life and activities and not being confined to only classrooms and laboratories. Universities need to work closely with industry and non-governmental and non-profit bodies to identify the needs of society and address them productively and work toward achieving common goals and objectives. In this book, authors have explored various facets of SDGs and how well universities have been able to integrate those goals into their curriculum and to institutionalize those goals into their strategic plans and institutional culture. Authors from Nigeria, sub Saharan Africa, Italy, and Middle East have elaborated how to achieve this in the face of shifting expectations, student debt, and graduate mobility. As a result, this volume shows how some universities are cultivating SDGs both on- and off campus.

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2017

Sacha St-Onge Ahmad and Mohsin Bashir

The purpose of this chapter is to critically examine the leaders of public–private partnerships (PPPs) in Pakistan through a social entrepreneurship lens. The literature…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to critically examine the leaders of public–private partnerships (PPPs) in Pakistan through a social entrepreneurship lens. The literature on social entrepreneurship was analysed to identify traits academics say social entrepreneurs have. Data were collected from primary and secondary sources. Primary sources of information were interviews with leaders’ former colleagues. Secondary research was conducted using grey literature, independent reports, web searches and the implementation of partners’ websites. The main finding from our analysis is that social entrepreneurship is an important driver of success in PPPs. All three PPPs had a focal person who exhibited important qualities found in social entrepreneurs and in one case, the decline of a partnership was observed shortly after the resignation of the social entrepreneur. Governments seeking to enter into partnerships with private organizations should prioritize finding social entrepreneurship in the partnering organization’s culture and/or leadership. Social welfare organizations are more likely to succeed if their management includes social entrepreneurs.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Public–Private Partnerships in Developing and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-494-1

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2019

Gillian Moran, Laurent Muzellec and Devon Johnson

This paper aims to uncover the drivers of consumer-brand engagement on Facebook, understood here as users’ behavioral responses in the form of clicks, likes, shares and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to uncover the drivers of consumer-brand engagement on Facebook, understood here as users’ behavioral responses in the form of clicks, likes, shares and comments. We highlight which content components, interactivity cues (calls to action [CTA]) and media richness (e.g. video, photo and text) are most effective at inducing consumers to exhibit clicking, liking, commenting and sharing behaviors toward branded content.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzes 757 Facebook-based brand posts from a media and entertainment brand over a 15-week period. It investigates the relationship between interactive cues and media richness with consumer engagement using a negative binomial model.

Findings

Results show positive relationships for both interactivity cues and media richness content components on increasing consumer-brand engagement outcomes. The findings add clarity to previous inconsistent findings in the marketing literature. CTAs enhance all four engagement behaviors. Media richness also strongly influences all engagement behaviors, with visual imagery (photos and videos) attracting the most consumer responses.

Research limitations/implications

The sampled posts pertain to one brand (a radio station) and are thus concentrated within the media/entertainment industry, which limits the generalizability of findings. In addition, the authors limit their focus to Facebook but recognize that findings may differ across more visual or textual social networking sites.

Practical implications

The authors uncover the most effective pairings of media richness and interactivity components to trigger marketer-desired, behavioral responses. For sharing, for example, the authors show that photo-based posts are more effective on average than video-based posts. The authors also show that including an interactive call to act to encourage one type of engagement behavior has a near-universal effect in increasing all engagement behaviors.

Originality/value

This study takes two widely used concepts within the communications and advertising literatures – interactivity cues and media richness – and tests their relationship with engagement using real and actual users’ data available via Facebook Insights. This method is more robust than surveys or wall scrapping, as it mitigates Facebook’s algorithm effect. The results produce more consistent relationships than previous content marketing studies to date.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Alison Z. Pyatt, Gillian H. Wright, Keith E. Walley and Emma Bleach

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the significance of value co-creation to the UK animal healthcare sector from the perspective of the key industry stakeholders…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the significance of value co-creation to the UK animal healthcare sector from the perspective of the key industry stakeholders: clients, veterinarians and paraprofessionals.

Design/methodology/approach

Value co-creation constructs in the sector were identified and measured using a mixed methods approach comprised of qualitative NVivo© thematic analysis of depth interviews (n=13) and quantitative exploratory factor analysis (EFA) (n=271).

Findings

Qualitative results revealed nine underlying dimensions regarding service delivery in the sector: trustworthiness, communication, value for money, empathy, bespoke, integrated care, tangibles, accessibility and outcome driven service. EFA of professional survey data loaded onto seven latent factors, with strong value co-creation dimensions identified.

Research limitations/implications

The sampling process is sufficiently representative and diverse to present meaningful and valuable results, however, surveying should be extended to include the client group. Due to the originality of the research replication of the study will be beneficial to the broader understanding and application of value co-creation to the high-involvement services of animal healthcare.

Practical implications

Recognition of the importance of value co-creation to the sector should encourage professional stakeholders to develop and adopt integrated models of service provision and to provide improved levels of service quality.

Originality/value

The paper makes an original contribution to knowledge regarding value co-creation in respect of high-involvement service provision. Its findings should be of value to academics interested in value co-creation in service sectors as well as animal healthcare practitioners seeking to offer better value and quality service provision.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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