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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Gillian King, Nicole Thomson, Mitchell Rothstein, Shauna Kingsnorth and Kathryn Parker

One of the major issues faced by academic health science centers (AHSCs) is the need for mechanisms to foster the integration of research, clinical, and educational…

Abstract

Purpose

One of the major issues faced by academic health science centers (AHSCs) is the need for mechanisms to foster the integration of research, clinical, and educational activities to achieve the vision of evidence-informed decision making (EIDM) and optimal client care. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper synthesizes literature on organizational learning and collaboration, evidence-informed organizational decision making, and learning-based organizations to derive insights concerning the nature of effective workplace learning in AHSCs.

Findings

An evidence-informed model of collaborative workplace learning is proposed to aid the alignment of research, clinical, and educational functions in AHSCs. The model articulates relationships among AHSC academic functions and sub-functions, cross-functional activities, and collaborative learning processes, emphasizing the importance of cross-functional activities in enhancing collaborative learning processes and optimizing EIDM and client care. Cross-functional activities involving clinicians, researchers, and educators are hypothesized to be a primary vehicle for integration, supported by a learning-oriented workplace culture. These activities are distinct from interprofessional teams, which are clinical in nature. Four collaborative learning processes are specified that are enhanced in cross-functional activities or teamwork: co-constructing meaning, co-learning, co-producing knowledge, and co-using knowledge.

Practical implications

The model provides an aspirational vision and insight into the importance of cross-functional activities in enhancing workplace learning. The paper discusses the conceptual and empirical basis to the model, its contributions and limitations, and implications for AHSCs.

Originality/value

The model’s potential utility for health care is discussed, with implications for organizational culture and the promotion of cross-functional activities.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Gillian King, Kathryn Parker, Sean Peacocke, C.J. Curran, Amy C. McPherson, Tom Chau, Elaine Widgett, Darcy Fehlings and Golda Milo-Manson

The purpose of this paper is to describe how an Academic Health Science Centre, providing pediatric rehabilitation services, research, and education, developed a Centres…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how an Academic Health Science Centre, providing pediatric rehabilitation services, research, and education, developed a Centres for Leadership (CfL) initiative to integrate its academic functions and embrace the goal of being a learning organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Historical documents, tracked output information, and staff members’ insights were used to describe the ten-year evolution of the initiative, its benefits, and transformational learnings for the organization.

Findings

The evolutions concerned development of a series of CfLs, and changes over time in leadership and management structure, as well as in operations and targeted activities. Benefits included enhanced clinician engagement in research, practice-based research, and impacts on clinical practice. Transformational learnings concerned the importance of supporting stakeholder engagement, fostering a spirit of inquiry, and fostering leaderful practice. These learnings contributed to three related emergent outcomes reflecting “way stations” on the journey to enhanced evidence-informed decision making and clinical excellence: enhancements in authentic partnerships, greater innovation capacity, and greater understanding and actualization of leadership values.

Practical implications

Practical information is provided for other organizations interested in understanding how this initiative evolved, its tangible value, and its wider benefits for organizational collaboration, innovation, and leadership values. Challenges encountered and main messages for other organizations are also considered.

Originality/value

A strategy map is used to present the structures, processes, and outcomes arising from the initiative, with the goal of informing the operations of other organizations desiring to be learning organizations.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Alastair Baker, Gillian Peacock, Susan Cozzolino, Angus Norton, Mike Joyce, Tristan Chapman and David Dawson

This paper aims to combine and compare the experiences of appreciative inquiry (AI) using AI methods for data creation, collection and analysis to describe a set of “rules…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to combine and compare the experiences of appreciative inquiry (AI) using AI methods for data creation, collection and analysis to describe a set of “rules of thumb” for the occasions when AI can add value in managing operational and cultural changes in healthcare organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The team that began to introduce AI to King's College Hospital met twice, each time using AI methods to collect and process narrative of their experiences of AI in their work. The eight members recalled as many of the AI‐related experiences and applications in their professional lives as possible, big and small. The data were collected as key points and quotable quotes, and shared for reflection, and a second time to identify and record common features of success and those aspects which seemed to be responsible for that success.

Findings

The paper identified ten groups of applications where AI offered solutions superior to others used, or where the currently applied methodology reached an impasse that was resolved by AI. It proposes that these applications are added to the growing list of uses of AI in change management and managing organisational behaviour.

Originality/value

While there are many published descriptions of successful use of AI in organisational development projects, the paper is unable to identify a compendium of practical descriptions of the use of AI. The paper is therefore valuable for anyone in a management or change‐management role with interest and some experience in AI in deciding how to use this methodology from day to day.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Melissa Fellin, Gillian King, Victoria Esses, Sally Lindsay and Anne Klassen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the barriers and facilitators to health and social service access and utilization for immigrant parents raising a child with a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the barriers and facilitators to health and social service access and utilization for immigrant parents raising a child with a physical disability, in order to understand their specific needs and experiences of care.

Design/methodology/approach

The research involves qualitative interviews with five immigrant parents of four children with a physical disability in two cities in Ontario, Canada.

Findings

The findings indicate that divergent perceptions of health care and disability, language, knowledge of service systems, and finances may create obstacles to family-centered and culturally sensitive care. Formal supports, including a third person to navigate the system and services provided in families’ homes, are facilitators that enhance the service care experiences of parents.

Practical implications

Service providers need to accommodate and work with immigrant parents who have a child with a disability to overcome the barriers to their care. To enhance service experiences formal support and home services should be provided when possible.

Originality/value

There is little research on immigrant families’ experiences with pediatric rehabilitation services and this study contributes to this area. This paper shows that immigrant families of children with disabilities have barriers to service access, utilization, and service care experiences that are similar to those of non-immigrant families. There are few studies on facilitators to service access and utilization and positive experiences; therefore, this study makes a contribution to this area.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Alec Knight, Peter Littlejohns, Tara-Lynn Poole, Gillian Leng and Colin Drummond

The purpose of this paper is to explore factors affecting implementing the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) quality standard on alcohol misuse…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore factors affecting implementing the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) quality standard on alcohol misuse (QS11) and barriers and facilitators to its implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative interview study analysed using directed and conventional content analyses. Participants were 38 individuals with experience of commissioning, delivering or using alcohol healthcare services in Southwark, Lambeth and Lewisham.

Findings

QS11 implementation ranged from no implementation to full implementation across the 13 statements. Implementation quality was also reported to vary widely across different settings. The analyses also uncovered numerous barriers and facilitators to implementing each statement. Overarching barriers to implementation included: inherent differences between specialist vs generalist settings; poor communication between healthcare settings; generic barriers to implementation; and poor governance structures and leadership.

Research limitations/implications

QS11 was created to summarise alcohol-related NICE guidance. The aim was to simplify guidance and enhance local implementation. However, in practice the standard requires complex actions by professionals. There was considerable variation in local alcohol commissioning models, which was associated with variation in implementation. These models warrant further evaluation to identify best practice.

Originality/value

Little evidence exists on the implementing quality standards, as distinct from clinical practice guidelines. The authors present direct evidence on quality standard implementation, identify implementation shortcomings and make recommendations for future research and practice.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1988

Sandra Fredman and Gillian Morris

The research aims to highlight the differences between State and non‐State employees, and to establish an analytic framework of discussion, looking at the different types…

Abstract

The research aims to highlight the differences between State and non‐State employees, and to establish an analytic framework of discussion, looking at the different types of legal and non‐legal regulation in public employment.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 11 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2020

Emma Day-Duro, Guy Lubitsh and Gillian Smith

To understand the partnership between clinicians and academics who come together to provide high-quality care alongside research and innovation, identifying challenges and…

Abstract

Purpose

To understand the partnership between clinicians and academics who come together to provide high-quality care alongside research and innovation, identifying challenges and productive conditions for innovation and collaboration across multi-disciplinary teams.

Design/methodology/approach

An explorative action research methodology was adopted. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 clinical, academic and executive leads at a large metropolitan tertiary care hospital with an academic health services portfolio in the UK.

Findings

Clinical leaders recognise the division of limited resource, restrictive employment contracts and the divergent priorities of each organisation as challenges hindering the collaborative process and derailing innovation. Developing a culture of respect, valuing and investing in individuals and allowing time and space for interaction help facilitate successful innovation and collaboration. Successfully leading collaborative innovation requires a combination of kindness, conviction and empowerment, alongside the articulation of a vision and accountability.

Research limitations/implications

Action research continues at this site, and further enquiry into the experiences, challenges and solutions of non-leaders when collaborating and innovating will be captured to present views across the organisation.

Practical implications

Clinical and academic collaboration and innovation are essential to the continued success of healthcare. To ensure hospitals can continue to facilitate this in increasingly challenging circumstances, they must ensure longevity and stability of teams, devote time and resource to research and innovation, nurture interpersonal skills and develop kind and empowering leaders.

Originality/value

This work uniquely focuses on a real-time collaborative and innovative development. By employing action research while this development was happening, we were able to access the real time views of those at the centre of that collaboration. We offer insight into the challenges and effective solutions that consultant-level clinical leaders encounter when attempting to innovate and collaborate in practice.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Heather McIlveen and Gillian Armstrong

The potential value of sensory analysis has often been undermined in the food industry, where results tend to be viewed with scepticism. In reality, however, various forms…

Abstract

The potential value of sensory analysis has often been undermined in the food industry, where results tend to be viewed with scepticism. In reality, however, various forms of sensory‐related work can provide an important investigative and informative function in a number of areas. This may include consumer preference and buying behaviour, product development, production and quality control. The objective must be to achieve a realistic balance between sensory and instrumental methods and to manage the sensory process effectively, if results are to be meaningful. The main problem, however, is in dealing with people and their variability. A preliminary study assessed the potential value of using computerized systems to help improve the credibility of sensory analysis and, in particular, to maintain and improve panel motivation and consistency of response. Generally, accuracy improved significantly as tests progressed and panellists preferred using the computerized system.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Gillian Symon and Catherine Cassell

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1980

Not many weeks back, according to newspaper reports, three members of the library staff of the School of Slavonic and East European Studies in London were dismissed. All…

Abstract

Not many weeks back, according to newspaper reports, three members of the library staff of the School of Slavonic and East European Studies in London were dismissed. All had refused to carry out issue desk duty. All, according to the newspaper account, were members of ASTMS. None, according to the Library Association yearbook, was a member of the appropriate professional organisation for librarians in Great Britain.

Details

Library Review, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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