Search results

1 – 10 of 30
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Helen Partridge and Gillian Hallam

The purpose of this paper is to consider how library education can best incorporate the profession's emerging interest in evidence‐based practice (EBP) whilst ensuring…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider how library education can best incorporate the profession's emerging interest in evidence‐based practice (EBP) whilst ensuring that the educational experience is meaningful to the contemporary library student.

Design/methodology/appraoch

A learning and teaching model developed by the Queensland University of Technology will be presented as a case study on how the library education curriculum can be developed to incorporate a focus on EBP whilst catering to the unique learning style of the millennial student.

Findings

To effectively meet the needs of the millennial student, library educators must develop their curriculum to include a real world activities and perspective, be customisable and flexible, incorporate regular feedback, use technology, provide trusted guidance, include the opportunity for social and interactive learning, be visual and kinaesthetic, and include communication that is real, raw, relevant and relational.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the current discussion on how EBP can be integrated effectively into the contemporary library curriculum in general, and meet the learning needs of the millennial student in particular.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Gillian Hallam and Carol Newton‐Smith

To present the findings of the comparative evaluation of two transitional mentoring programs developed for new library and information professionals in Australia, one as a…

Abstract

Purpose

To present the findings of the comparative evaluation of two transitional mentoring programs developed for new library and information professionals in Australia, one as a group program and the other with pairs of mentors/mentees.

Design/methodology/approach

The research project involved an initial review of the literature. A comparative study was undertaken, with a survey approach to collect data from the participants in the transitional mentoring programs. The study obtained data about three key areas: career‐related, learning‐related, and professional development.

Findings

It was found that participants had a high level of satisfaction with both the programs and both mentor and mentee reported positive career, learning and personal development outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited to one year of transitional mentoring activity for one professional field in Australia. It would be beneficial to continue the study over a longer period of time to collect further data from other participants.

Practical implications

The research project highlights evaluation of mentoring programs. The project has helped develop an initial understanding of benefits to be gained through mentoring relationships to support new professionals. The study is likely to have wider application across other professional disciplines and may encourage professionals to consider mentoring as a valuable part of career development.

Originality/value

The paper provides information about two different models of transitional mentoring programs, together with one possible approach for the evaluation of mentoring programs. The paper offers support and encouragement to any professional group planning to establish and manage a mentoring program.

Details

Library Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 31 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 35 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 34 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 34 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 34 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 36 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Kate Davis, Gillian Hallam, Katya Henry, Wendy Davis, Kysira Fairbairn and Ellen Heidelberger

The article aims to review a university course, offered to students in both Australia and Germany, to encourage them to learn about designing, implementing, marketing and…

Abstract

Purpose

The article aims to review a university course, offered to students in both Australia and Germany, to encourage them to learn about designing, implementing, marketing and evaluating information programs and services in order to build active and engaged communities. The concepts and processes of Web 2.0 technologies come together in the learning activities, with students establishing their own personal learning networks (PLNs).

Design/methodology/approach

The case study examines the principles of learning and teaching that underpin the course and presents the students' own experiences of the challenges they faced as they explored the interactive, participative and collaborative dimensions of the web.

Findings

The online format of the course and the philosophy of learning through play provided students with a safe and supportive environment for them to move outside of their comfort zones, to be creative, to experiment and to develop their professional personas. Reflection on learning was a key component that stressed the value of reflective practice in assisting library and information science (LIS) professionals to adapt confidently to the rapidly changing work environment.

Originality/value

This study provides insights into the opportunities for LIS courses to work across geographical boundaries, to allow students to critically appraise library practice in different contexts and to become active participants in wider professional networks.

Details

New Library World, vol. 113 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Judy Stokker and Gillian Hallam

The paper aims to describe a workforce‐planning model developed in‐house in an Australian university library that is based on rigorous environmental scanning of an…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to describe a workforce‐planning model developed in‐house in an Australian university library that is based on rigorous environmental scanning of an institution, the profession and the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a case study that describes the stages of the planning process undertaken to develop the Library's Workforce Plan and the documentation produced.

Findings

While it has been found that the process has had successful and productive outcomes, workforce planning is an ongoing process. To remain effective, the workforce plan needs to be reviewed annually in the context of the library's overall planning program. This is imperative if the plan is to remain current and to be regarded as a living document that will continue to guide library practice. Research limitations/implications – Although a single case study, the work has been contextualized within the wider research into workforce planning.

Practical implications

The paper provides a model that can easily be deployed within a library without external or specialist consultant skills, and due to its scalability can be applied at department or wider level.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the trends impacting on, and the emerging opportunities for, university libraries and provides a model for workforce planning that recognizes the context and culture of the organization as key drivers in determining workforce planning.

Details

Library Management, vol. 30 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

1 – 10 of 30