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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Gilli Crick

Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Dave Crick and James M. Crick

The purpose of this paper is to help develop the understanding of the nature of coopetition (collaboration as well as competition) and is set in the context of a Taekwondo…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to help develop the understanding of the nature of coopetition (collaboration as well as competition) and is set in the context of a Taekwondo organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were undertaken with 25 instructors in various clubs within New Zealand’s “International Taekwondo” (ITKD) together with 25 students and supplemented with triangulation against secondary data such as websites and media reports.

Findings

The findings suggest that coopetition can be seen from various perspectives in order that the organisation as a whole benefits. Specifically, while the ITKD is a not-for-profit firm, individual clubs may compete for revenue from students joining them as opposed to rival clubs. However, clubs collaborate in various way such as once registered, students can train free at rival clubs and resources are to some extent pooled so the ITKD as a whole benefits, e.g. sending competitors overseas and bringing in senior people to undertake a promotion grading.

Originality/value

The contribution is to offer insights into the nature of coopetition at the sports marketing/entrepreneurship interface by suggesting that the potential paradox of collaboration and competition can be explained by considering the benefits to an overall organisation as opposed to individual clubs within it.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Russell Belk and Joyce Hsiu‐yen Yeh

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the reasons that tourists capture images of their trips on cameras or camcorders.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the reasons that tourists capture images of their trips on cameras or camcorders.

Design/methodology/approach

Over a period of approximately five years, the authors observed, photographed and interviewed tourists taking photos or videos in diverse international locations. Upon returning home, informants e‐mailed their trip photos together with descriptions of what the images meant and what they had done with them when at home. These data were archived and interpreted in line with the central research questions.

Findings

Why does almost every tourist carry a camera or camcorder? What are they doing making these images? And what do they do with them once they return home? The accompanying video conveys most of the findings, while the manuscript elaborates on certain theoretical points and provides contextualizing and supportive evidence from the literatures dealing with tourism and photography.

Originality/value

The paper suggests that the images form part of an identity project, serving as a means of conveying internal tales to the self rather than as a means of, beyond the immediate family, communicating with others. The images act as tools for displacing meanings that are too fragile and tenuous to be contained in the fragile present as Grant McCracken describes more generally with regard to tying hopes and dreams to places and times of the past and future.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Debi P. Mishra, Rasleen K. Kukreja and Arun S. Mishra

This paper aims to investigate how the emerging blockchain technology can tackle dark side or dysfunctional effects at different stages of the interorganizational…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how the emerging blockchain technology can tackle dark side or dysfunctional effects at different stages of the interorganizational relationship life cycle. The rationale for this study stems from the somewhat paradoxical causes of dysfunctional effects. In particular, concepts such as trust and cooperation that typically result in positive relationship outcomes may also lead to negative effects under certain conditions. This contradiction creates a governance headache for organizations in their quest for initiating, developing, maintaining and enhancing efficient interorganizational relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The study draws upon multiple organizational theories (agency, signaling, transaction cost, population ecology, institutional) and develops a conceptual understanding of how blockchain can serve as a safeguard for tackling dark side effects in interorganizational relationships. Primarily, the paper outlines a set of research propositions that provides a platform for developing an actionable managerial decision framework. In addition, the authors conduct an automated textual analysis of qualitative blockchain expert opinion using the ALCESTE software and uncover salient themes about blockchain governance.

Findings

The blockchain ledger distributes trust among participants and keeps dark side effects at bay. Hence, blockchain can transform conventional approaches for handling dark side effects into value creating activities. The results of an automated textual analysis on a corpus of expert opinions provides preliminary support for several aspects of blockchain governance. Furthermore, the study articulates a decision framework that managers can use for optimal relationship governance and identifies several areas for future research.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is conceptual in nature and draws upon multiple theoretical perspectives to outline a set of research propositions. Thus, lack of empirical testing is a current limitation. However, the findings from an automated textual analysis of expert opinions provide exploratory but encouraging support for the power of blockchain to tackle dark side effects.

Practical implications

Managers can deploy blockchain creatively while selecting interorganizational relationship partners. For example, provenance issues in organizations’ supply chains can be efficiently managed using blockchain. Likewise, organizations may also create efficient learning around blockchain to gain efficiencies in relationship management.

Originality/value

Conventional approaches for managing dark side effects in interorganizational relationships rely mainly on ex post governance strategies. By contrast, this paper supplements the extant approach by discussing ex ante strategies that can be deployed at different stages of the interorganizational relationship cycle, e.g. initiation, maintenance/development and termination to better address dark side effects.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2019

Intekhab Alam

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the process of interaction with the Muslim customers in developing new Islamic financial services in a secular and non-Muslim…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the process of interaction with the Muslim customers in developing new Islamic financial services in a secular and non-Muslim majority emerging country, India.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a multiple case study methodology in which the service managers of 23 financial service firms and their customers were interviewed. A total of 46 managers and 31 Muslim customers provided data for this paper.

Findings

A service firm must interact with its Muslim customers to obtain key input and information for developing new Islamic financial services, particularly in a Muslim minority country. The Muslim customers are willing to work with the financial service firms for the purpose of new service development and are a good source of information for new Islamic financial services.

Practical implications

The paper has implications for the financial service firms interested in achieving growth and prosperity by developing and marketing new services to the growing population of Muslim customers in the emerging markets, particularly India.

Originality/value

The issue of customer interaction in new service development is a key concept in the extant literature, yet no study has explored this concept for the Islamic banking and financial products in a non-Muslim majority emerging market. This is the first paper that has applied the customer interaction in new service development theory to the interaction process of Muslim customers in a non-Muslim majority country and, thus, addressed a worthwhile research gap.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Zubin Sethna

The present study seeks to investigate how individual and organisational consumption is affected when dealing with small and medium‐sized enterprise (SME) organisations…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study seeks to investigate how individual and organisational consumption is affected when dealing with small and medium‐sized enterprise (SME) organisations from emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

Using ethnographic in‐depth interviews, data were collected from 20 Indian UK‐based “buyers” who have either previously bought or are currently buying from organisations based in India. Investigates the perceptions surrounding challenges and/or benefits held by these 20 SMEs. Identified areas such as inter‐cultural blending, community support, country‐of‐origin effects, generational shifts and finally, attitudes towards quality, price, consistency, and branding.

Findings

Findings indicate that the respondents did not vary at all on their collective perceptions about buying from emerging economies, specifically, India. The over‐riding issue that was highlighted many times over was one of “trust in the relationship” between buyer and seller. Findings also suggest the need to take a holistic view on the whole arena of “marketing paradigms for emerging economies”. Despite a climate of increased globalization, an intensification of international contact of businesses, increased travel of executives, and an enlarged overseas education by Indians, there still seems to be a vast gap between the perceptions that are held by India‐based executives and their UK counterparts (high cultural distance).

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions outline information that may potentially be useful to Indian suppliers for use as a reference guideline when entering relationships with UK‐based customers, of either a similar or indeed dissimilar cultural background.

Originality/value

Adds to existing knowledge of how individual and organisational consumption is affected when dealing with SME organisations from emerging economies.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2021

Wenkai Zhou, Zhilin Yang and Michael R. Hyman

This study aims to summarize the important contextual influences East Asian philosophy may have on marketing strategy and consumerism.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to summarize the important contextual influences East Asian philosophy may have on marketing strategy and consumerism.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach is used to deconstruct (1) the literature on marketing as a contextual discipline, (2) East Asian philosophical underpinnings and their personal and institutional manifestations in East Asian marketing contexts, and (3) the implications for non-East Asian marketers. This essay includes a brief introduction to the manuscripts in this special issue.

Findings

Ancient philosophical wisdom shared by East Asian societies can shed light on how marketing activities and consumer behavior intertwine within East Asia and beyond. Three ancient philosophies (i.e. Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism) heavily influence East Asian societies through personal and institutional-level cultural manifestations in marketing contexts.

Research limitations/implications

Although the three discussed East Asian philosophical schools are not exhaustive, they lay a foundation for future discussions about how alternative marketing-related theories and frameworks may complement ones grounded in western historical and cultural contexts.

Originality/value

This essay initiates an overdue academic discussion about relying on non-western historical and cultural contexts to globalize the marketing discipline further.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2013

Inga Haus, Holger Steinmetz, Rodrigo Isidor and Rüdiger Kabst

Although the percentage of female entrepreneurs has increased over the past several years, it is far below the level of males. Drawing on the theory of planned behaviour…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the percentage of female entrepreneurs has increased over the past several years, it is far below the level of males. Drawing on the theory of planned behaviour and role congruity theory, the purpose of this paper is to specify a model in which the relationship between gender and entrepreneurial intention (EI) is mediated by three essential motivational constructs (i.e. attitude toward starting a business, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control (PBC)).

Design/methodology/approach

The study specifies and tests a meta‐analytical structural equation model. The study aggregates the results of 30 studies (n=52,367).

Findings

The study reveals a higher average EI for men compared to women. However, although significant, the gender differences in EI and the motivational constructs were small and cannot sufficiently explain the substantial differences in actually starting a business. Furthermore, moderator analyses show differences in the gender‐EI relationship between Europe and the US and between students and non‐students.

Research limitations/implications

Differences between men and women seem to be a consequence of differences in turning intentions into implementation. Researchers are called upon to investigate gender differences in hindrances as a potential explanation for different implementations and when and why women give up their entrepreneurial plans. Moreover, future research should investigate further motivational processes beyond those suggested by the theory of planned behavior.

Originality/value

The study analyses the relationship between gender and EI and the results show a weak relationship which indicates that the higher number of male entrepreneurs cannot solely be explained by differences in motivation.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2009

Eleni K. Kevork and Adam P. Vrechopoulos

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on customer relationship management (CRM) to obtain a comprehensive framework of mutually exclusive CRM research…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on customer relationship management (CRM) to obtain a comprehensive framework of mutually exclusive CRM research areas and sub‐areas free of all potentially disruptive factors (plethora of CRM definitions, personal judgments, etc.).

Design/methodology/approach

The keywords reported in 396 CRM articles published during the period 2000‐2006 are used to uncover first a great number of detailed keyword sub‐groups and, by subject summation, the CRM‐related research areas. This classification scheme is considered unbiased, in contrast with any direct classification of articles alone among CRM research areas fixed in advance.

Findings

An up‐to‐date conceptual and functional CRM framework emerges, consisting of a total of nine distinct research areas having their own weights, importance and popularity among the research community. Newly emerging CRM research areas are self‐identified as attracting the interest of the researchers and managers.

Originality/value

Keywords are activated, for a first time, as an added value characteristic reflecting genuinely the authors' beliefs about the subject content fields of their articles, important enough to reveal a self‐supported and self‐weighted unbiased and exhaustive CRM framework, useful to researchers and marketing practitioners. The paper offers strong evidence that e‐CRM is too complex to be comprehensively classified by mere procedures and simple criteria alone.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2012

Abstract

Details

Culture and Society in Tourism Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-683-7

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