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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Gilles E. Gignac, Richard J. Harmer, Sue Jennings and Benjamin R. Palmer

The purpose of this paper is to examine statistically the efficacy of an emotional intelligence (EI) training program on sales performance and emotional intelligence in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine statistically the efficacy of an emotional intelligence (EI) training program on sales performance and emotional intelligence in a group of salespeople.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental, repeated measures/between‐groups design was used (training group (n=29) and a control group (n=21)). The dependent variables were sales performance, self‐report EI and rater‐report EI. The data were analysed based on a series of split‐plot ANOVAS.

Findings

Rater‐reported EI correlated with sales performance at r=0.32. The EI training group also demonstrated increases in both self‐ and rater‐report EI equal to approximately a Cohen's d=−0.45, in comparison to the control group. Finally, the EI training group outperformed the control group by approximately 9 per cent (p<0.05) in sales performance.

Research limitations/implications

The long‐term beneficial effects of the EI training program on sales performance are not known.

Practical implications

Human resource practitioners and coaches may consider implementing an EI training program to facilitate performance in sales people.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the effects of an EI training program using a rigorous experimental methodology and an objective measure of sales performance.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Gilles E. Gignac and Benjamin R. Palmer

This paper aims to describe a new measure of employee motivational fit, namely the Genos employee motivation assessment (GEMA), its predictive validity and use in learning

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a new measure of employee motivational fit, namely the Genos employee motivation assessment (GEMA), its predictive validity and use in learning and organizational development activities.

Design/methodology/approach

Within three different organizations, employees completed GEMA via an online web survey system. Correlation analyses were then performed with a series of job performance and employee engagement data.

Findings

Motivational fit (i.e. the degree of alignment between what an individual is motivated by and experiences in their work), within four areas measured by GEMA (namely, role fit, management fit, team fit, and organization fit), were found to be associated with average predictive validity correlation coefficients equal to 0.46, .073, 0.67, and 0.52, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

Statistical analyses at the individual level would be beneficial in future research. Additionally, whether motivational fit can be improved via learning and/or organizational development interventions, and whether such improvement leads to corresponding improvements in performance and engagement remains to be determined.

Practical implications

Intervention initiatives designed to improve motivational fit need to be designed and tested. The findings of this study suggest that successful interventions may result in improvements in job performance and employee engagement.

Originality/value

This paper will be of interest to professionals in recruitment, learning and organizational development interested in the improvement of job performance and employee engagement. This is the first study to examine the validity of GEMA scores and to propose the potential use of motivational fit as an intervention medium to improve these areas.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Benjamin R. Palmer and Gilles Gignac

The purpose of this paper is to present research on the relationship between the emotional intelligence (EI) of managers and levels of engagement amongst their direct

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present research on the relationship between the emotional intelligence (EI) of managers and levels of engagement amongst their direct reports. The findings are discussed in terms of a business case for EI development as a strategy to improve employment brand, talent retention and productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

Within three different organisations, employees completed an assessment of their engagement and the EI of their manager via an online web survey system. Correlation analyses were then performed with the data.

Findings

The EI of managers was found to meaningfully correlate with employee engagement scores. A substantial amount of the variability in direct report engagement scores was accounted for by managers' EI.

Research limitations/implications

Future research needs to establish whether the EI of managers correlates with direct report engagement scores whilst controlling for direct reports' EI. Additionally, whether employee engagement scores improve as a result of improvements in managers' EI needs to be examined.

Practical implications

Organisations may be able to improve their employment brand, talent retention and productivity by developing the EI of management.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to report on the empirical relationship between managers' EI and employee engagement. It will be of interest to those who are challenged with the task of improving leadership and employee engagement more broadly.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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