Search results

1 – 6 of 6
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Gilles Cormier and Nidhal Rezg

The purpose of this study is to gain some insights into the number of shortages resulting from two alternative demand allocation schemes between a contractor (machine M1

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to gain some insights into the number of shortages resulting from two alternative demand allocation schemes between a contractor (machine M1) and subcontractor (machine M2), on the one hand, and from inventory accumulation, on the other hand. The shortages stem from random machine breakdowns, and each machine undergoes preventive maintenance. The motivation behind inventory accumulation is to allow demand to be fulfilled even when both machines are down.

Design/methodology/approach

The number of shortages stemming from all scenarios under consideration was established via computer simulation with the Arena© language.

Findings

For demand allocation that remains unchanged for the duration of the planning horizon and constant reliability of M1, it was found that, the less reliable M2 is, the more biased in favour of M1 will be the optimal demand allocation and the greater will be the number of shortages. Moreover, both dynamic demand reallocation over the planning horizon and inventory accumulation result in a substantial reduction in shortages.

Research limitations/implications

The results are representative of the specific data, which were assumed in the simulation models. Nevertheless, this methodology is recommended for this type of analysis, as it is highly flexible and can take into account many practical considerations, which an analytical approach cannot.

Practical implications

Within the context of unreliable production machines, the most important practical implication of this study is that the dynamic reallocation of demand between a contractor and subcontractor, along with inventory accumulation, both have the potential to yield important reductions in the number of shortages.

Originality/value

The subject‐matter of this paper was not previously reported in the literature. Furthermore, the insights gained as a result of this study can yield substantial benefits to companies in terms of improving their service levels as measured by reduced shortages.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Ikram Radhouane, Mehdi Nekhili, Haithem Nagati and Gilles Paché

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the potential benefits for firms that report more on environmental activities, with regard to two important categories of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the potential benefits for firms that report more on environmental activities, with regard to two important categories of stakeholders: shareholders and customers.

Design/methodology/approach

To avoid the endogeneity problem, the authors apply the system generalized method of moments approach by estimating the relationship between environmental reporting and firm performance with regard both to levels and first differences simultaneously.

Findings

Based on the 120 largest publicly traded companies in France from 2007 to 2011, results suggest that shareholders interpret and perceive firms’ environmental information disclosure differently than consumers. However, reporting on environmental duties is perceived favorably by both customers and shareholders for firms with better environmental performance. In the same way, an increase in the level of environmental reporting is valuable in terms of customer-related performance (i.e. sales growth and profit margin) and in terms of market value (i.e. Tobin’s q) for firms operating in customer proximity industries. In a supplementary analysis, the authors found that, for reporting on climate change (a component of the combined environmental reporting index), positive customer and shareholder perceptions are acquired in particular through superior environmental performance and proximity to the final customer.

Research limitations/implications

When reporting on their environmental duties, environmental performance and proximity to the final customers play a critical role for firms in obtaining the necessary support of key stakeholders.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to explore the difference between shareholders’ and customers’ perception of environmental reporting according to firms’ environmental performance and to their proximity to the final customer.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 July 2019

Ikram Radhouane, Mehdi Nekhili, Haithem Nagati and Gilles Paché

This paper aims to investigate whether providing voluntary external assurance on voluntary environmental information by firms operating in environmentally sensitive…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether providing voluntary external assurance on voluntary environmental information by firms operating in environmentally sensitive industries (ESI) is relevant in terms of market value. It also examines how various characteristics of assurance statements (i.e. level of assurance, scope of assurance and provider of assurance) affect the value-relevance of environmental disclosure by ESI firms.

Design/methodology/approach

To mitigate the endogeneity problem, the authors use the two-step generalized method of moments estimation approach.

Findings

Focusing on annual and social reports of French companies listed in the SBF120 index, results show that environmental disclosure by ESI firms and its assurance are destructive in terms of market value. Moreover, while providing a broader scope of assurance and having a professional accountant as the assurance provider enhance the value relevance of environmental reporting of the whole sample, this is unlikely to be the case for ESI firms. In particular, a higher level of environmental disclosure is financially rewarded by market participants for ESI firms that provide a higher level of assurance.

Practical implications

The study provides a better understanding of the circumstances under which market participants assign value to voluntary environmental information disclosed by companies operating in ESI. It also provides insights into the value added to different characteristics inherent in the quality of assurance provided with regard to environmental disclosure.

Social implications

The study indicates that the institutional context of the relationship between the firm and its shareholders influence the value obtained from assurance. Results provide value insights regarding cultural and legal dimensions of environmental reporting.

Originality/value

The study extends the prior literature on the capital market benefits of voluntary assurance practices by focusing on the French legal environment. France can be considered as a new institutional context that has been little addressed by the existing literature.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Richard Duhautois, Fabrice Gilles and Héloïse Petit

Applied research shows higher wages are associated with lower mobility at the establishment level. A usual interpretation is that high pay decreases labour turnover. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Applied research shows higher wages are associated with lower mobility at the establishment level. A usual interpretation is that high pay decreases labour turnover. The purpose of this paper is to test if such relationship holds for every type of worker in every type of firm.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on a linked employer-employee panel dataset covering the French private sector from 2002 to 2005. The authors compute establishment wage effects and use them as explanatory variables in labour mobility equations (for churning rate and quit rate). Using spline regression models enables to investigate for potential non-linearities.

Findings

The authors show that the relationship between churning rate and wage is non-linear and has the shape of an inverted J: the relation is negative and intense for establishments with low wage effect, weaker for average paying establishments and even becomes positive for very high-paying ones. This is true whatever the skill group of workers. It is also true for large establishments while the relationship is still negative but linear for small ones. The relationship between wages and quit rates has a strikingly similar pattern. This suggests that the link between churning and establishment wage effect is strongly related to quit decisions.

Practical implications

A possible interpretation of our results is that paying higher wages may be an effective stabilizing tool especially for employers in small establishments and when starting wages are relatively low.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to decompose the relationship between wage and mobility. It shows the relationship differs across establishment size and is not linear. The paper also shows quits play a role in this relationship.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 August 2018

Hugues Seraphin

The purpose of this paper is to determine the future of the tourism industry in Haiti. More specifically, the paper answers the following question: will Haiti be able to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the future of the tourism industry in Haiti. More specifically, the paper answers the following question: will Haiti be able to reclaim a positive image and leading position in the Caribbean as a tourist destination?

Design/methodology/approach

Within the paradigm of theory building and exploratory approach, this conceptual study is based on a narrative literature review.

Findings

The turning point in the development of the tourism industry in Haiti has been the 2010 earthquake which has triggered a will to provide quality products and service specifically in the hospitality sector, the most dynamic sector of the tourism industry. With the diaspora, Haiti has the potential to reclaim a positive image and a leading position in the Caribbean. That said, before performing at this level, the destination must first and foremost contribute to the wellbeing of its people as a sine qua non condition for the success of its tourism industry.

Practical implications

The findings of this research may help potential investors to decide whether or not they want to invest in Haiti. The findings of the paper may also assist the DMO in its branding and marketing strategy.

Originality/value

The alleviation of poverty using tourism as a tool in a post-colonial, post-conflict and post-disaster context should be analysed, understood and approached from a human aspect point of view and perspective. Resilience is what better describes the tourism industry and the locals in Haiti. The locals are neither passive nor powerless.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2019

Felice Matozza, Anna Maria Biscotti and Elisabetta Mafrolla

This paper aims to examine whether firms in polluting industries improve their environmental performance to effectively repair their financial reputation in the aftermath…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether firms in polluting industries improve their environmental performance to effectively repair their financial reputation in the aftermath of an accounting restatement – a financial reputation-damaging event.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors test their hypotheses using multiple regression analysis of a sample of firms listed in International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS)-adopting countries. They use a comparative empirical design in which a sample of firms that underwent a restatement (henceforth, restating firms) are compared with control groups of pair- and multiple-matched firms that did not undergo restatements (non-restating firms).

Findings

The study finds that restating firms have higher environmental performance in the aftermath of restatement events. Additionally, the authors demonstrate that this environmentally based reputation repair positively influences the financial reputation of the firms, as measured by analyst coverage and recommendations and which previously decreased because of the restatement event.

Practical implications

Because environmental levers are a substantial contextual factor in polluting industries, shifting the stakeholder debate to firms’ environmental commitment can improve financial stakeholders’ opinions and favour the repair of the multifaceted reputation of the financially damaged firm.

Social implications

With a worldwide growing attention to environment there is a critical need for understanding how polluting firms integrate sustainability and financial reputation. We demostrate that polluting firms recover from a financial failure pursuing their environmental performance.

Originality/value

Contributing to the behavioural theory of reputation repair and in line with the legitimacy perspective in environmental disclosure research, this paper shows that polluting firms recover from a loss to their financial reputation by diverting stakeholders’ attention towards the environmental field, thus restoring their financial reputation, as financial analysts value environmental performance improvement – a substantial contextual factor of polluting firms’ reputation repair process.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

1 – 6 of 6