Search results

1 – 10 of 14
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Giampaolo Viglia and Graziano Abrate

This study aims to explain briefly the history and the future of revenue and yield management, offering a graphical visual model to identify the main internal and external…

1006

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explain briefly the history and the future of revenue and yield management, offering a graphical visual model to identify the main internal and external elements to be faced by revenue managers.

Design/methodology/approach

Stemming from what happened in the past, the authors predict the key elements in revenue management moving forward.

Findings

The authors discuss four notable emerging themes for a fertile revenue management application: organizational culture; dynamic pricing, both in terms of intertemporal price discrimination and inventory controls; personalized pricing; and distribution channels.

Originality/value

The paper offers informative knowledge to revenue managers and academics working in the area of strategic yield and revenue management.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 75 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 August 2022

Giampaolo Viglia and Diletta Acuti

This study encourages a quantum leap knowledge encouraging tourism researchers to measure actual behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

This study encourages a quantum leap knowledge encouraging tourism researchers to measure actual behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

This study enhances the contribution of scholars to the achievement of Sustainable Development Goals; it is key to understand how to alleviate the distance between consumers’ intentions and behavior.

Findings

This study proposes a conceptual figure that shows how relative value, rationality and social desirability are the key determinants that hamper intentions in becoming behaviors.

Originality/value

This study encourages scholars to consider consumers’ perceptions and the relative value they attribute to sustainability in their decision-making and to conduct field studies that observe consumer behavior in the real world and measure not just the intentions, but what is actually happening.

设计/方法/途径

为了提高学者们对实现可持续发展目标的贡献, 关键的问题是要了解如何减少消费者的意图和行为之间的距离。

目的

我们想鼓励旅游研究人员测量实际行为, 成就一个飞跃性的知识。

结论

我们提出了一个概念图, 显示了相对价值、理性和社会期望是如何成为阻碍意图变成行为的关键决定因素的。

原创性/价值

我们鼓励学者们考虑消费者的看法和他们在决策中赋予可持续性的相对价值, 并进行实地研究, 观察消费者在现实世界中的行为, 不仅衡量意图, 更要衡量实际发生的情况。

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

Para mejorar la contribución de los estudiosos a la consecución de los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible, es fundamental entender cómo se puede paliar la distancia entre las intenciones y el comportamiento de los consumidores.

Propósito

Queremos impulsar un salto en el conocimiento que anime a los investigadores del turismo a medir el comportamiento real.

Resultados

Proponemos una figura conceptual que muestra cómo el valor relativo, la racionalidad y la deseabilidad social son los determinantes clave que dificultan que las intenciones se conviertan en comportamientos.

Originalidad/valor

Animamos a los estudiosos a tener en cuenta las percepciones de los consumidores y el valor relativo que atribuyen a la sostenibilidad en su toma de decisiones y a realizar estudios de campo que observen el comportamiento de los consumidores en el mundo real y midan no sólo las intenciones, sino lo que realmente ocurre.

Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

Paolo Figini, Laura Vici and Giampaolo Viglia

This study aims to compare the rating dynamics of the same hotels in two online review platforms (Booking.com and Trip Advisor), which mainly differ in requiring or not…

540

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to compare the rating dynamics of the same hotels in two online review platforms (Booking.com and Trip Advisor), which mainly differ in requiring or not requiring proof of prior reservation before posting a review (respectively, a verified vs a non-verified platform).

Design/methodology/approach

A verified system, by definition, cannot host fake reviews. Should also the non-verified system be free from “ambiguous” reviews, the structure of ratings (valence, variability, dynamics) for the same items should also be similar. Any detected structural difference, on the contrary, might be linked to a possible review bias.

Findings

Travelers’ scores in the non-verified platform are higher and much more volatile than ratings in the verified platform. Additionally, the verified review system presents a faster convergence of ratings towards the long-term scores of individual hotels, whereas the non-verified system shows much more discordance in the early phases of the review window.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers insights into how to detect suspicious reviews. Non-verified platforms should add indices of scores’ dispersion to existing information available in websites and mobile apps. Moreover, they can use time windows to delete older (and more likely biased) reviews. Findings also ring a warning bell to tourists about the reliability of ratings, particularly when only a few reviews are posted online.

Originality/value

The across-platform comparison of single items (in terms of ratings’ dynamics and speed of convergence) is a novel contribution that calls for extending the analysis to different destinations and types of platform.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Management and Business Economics, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2444-8451

Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

YaoJen Tu, Barbara Neuhofer and Giampaolo Viglia

Customer willingness to pay (WTP) was initially set out to estimate the perceived value from a purchasing experience. However, purchasing decisions have changed as value…

1787

Abstract

Purpose

Customer willingness to pay (WTP) was initially set out to estimate the perceived value from a purchasing experience. However, purchasing decisions have changed as value co-creation has been increasingly applied in the hospitality industry. In adopting a service-dominant (S-D) logic lens, this paper aims to empirically test how co-creation affects WTP through customer engagement (CE).

Design/methodology/approach

The context for the empirical analysis is the Chinese market, one of the largest online purchasing markets that has been significantly transformed since the proliferation of co-creation. The study is a within-design online experiment with 488 Chinese participants. The analysis makes use of mediation models to evaluate the proposed mechanisms behind co-creation, CE and the moderated role of frequency of stay, and their impacts on WTP.

Findings

The data confirm the hypothesised positive impact of value co-creation on customer WTP. This impact is fully mediated by CE, i.e. CE is the mechanism behind a higher WTP propensity for co-created hotel rooms. Notably, the frequency of stay at a hotel, thus positively influencing WTP, does not have a moderated mediation effect on this relationship.

Originality/value

Limited research to date has investigated the price effectiveness of value co-creation in the hospitality context. This study contributes to the S-D logic and value co-creation discourses by testing the effectiveness of these concepts in relation to customer pricing decisions. This study empirically confirms the hypothesised model and provides recommendations for hospitality research and practice.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2018

Jorge Matute, Ramon Palau-Saumell and Giampaolo Viglia

This paper aims to investigate how employees’ emotional competences affect customers’ responses in the context of emotional-driven and personalized services. Specifically…

1239

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how employees’ emotional competences affect customers’ responses in the context of emotional-driven and personalized services. Specifically, it proposes a model to analyze the influence of employees’ emotional competence on rapport, trust and loyalty toward the service employee and the company.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical context to validate the proposed theory is the fitness realm. The sample comprises 296 clients from fitness personal training services. Data collection was carried out by means of personal surveys in three relevant fitness clubs in the city of Barcelona (Spain). The study uses partial least squares to test and validate the proposed theoretical model.

Findings

Employee emotional competence (EEC) directly affects personal loyalty, trust toward the service employee and rapport. However, higher levels of emotional skills are not significantly associated with loyalty toward the company. The results also suggest that trust significantly enhances loyalty. Interestingly, high levels of rapport between the service worker and the employee could even damage the level of loyalty toward the company.

Originality/value

Prior research documents that emotional intelligence enhances diverse positive customer outcomes, especially in emotionally charged interactions. Nonetheless, few studies have focused on analyzing how customers’ perceptions about services employees’ emotional skills are determining their attitudes and behavioral intentions. This study provides evidence on employee’s influences on consumer behaviors and outcomes, with a specific focus on EEC. It also sheds light on the unintuitive impact of customer employee rapport on loyalty toward the company.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 May 2019

Dimitrios Buhalis, Tracy Harwood, Vanja Bogicevic, Giampaolo Viglia, Srikanth Beldona and Charles Hofacker

Technological disruptions such as the Internet of Things and autonomous devices, enhanced analytical capabilities (artificial intelligence) and rich media (virtual and…

12162

Abstract

Purpose

Technological disruptions such as the Internet of Things and autonomous devices, enhanced analytical capabilities (artificial intelligence) and rich media (virtual and augmented reality) are creating smart environments that are transforming industry structures, processes and practices. The purpose of this paper is to explore critical technological advancements using a value co-creation lens to provide insights into service innovations that impact ecosystems. The paper provides examples from tourism and hospitality industries as an information dependent service management context.

Design/methodology/approach

The research synthesizes prevailing theories of co-creation, service ecosystems, networks and technology disruption with emerging technological developments.

Findings

Findings highlight the need for research into service innovations in the tourism and hospitality sector at both macro-market and micro-firm levels, emanating from the rapid and radical nature of technological advancements. Specifically, the paper identifies three areas of likely future disruption in service experiences that may benefit from immediate attention: extra-sensory experiences, hyper-personalized experiences and beyond-automation experiences.

Research limitations/implications

Tourism and hospitality services prevail under varying levels of infrastructure, organization and cultural constraints. This paper provides an overview of potential disruptions and developments and does not delve into individual destination types and settings. This will require future work that conceptualizes and examines how stakeholders may adapt within specific contexts.

Social implications

Technological disruptions impact all facets of life. A comprehensive picture of developments here provides policymakers with nuanced perspectives to better prepare for impending change.

Originality/value

Guest experiences in tourism and hospitality by definition take place in hostile environments that are outside the safety and familiarity of one’s own surroundings. The emergence of smart environments will redefine how customers navigate their experiences. At a conceptual level, this requires a complete rethink of how stakeholders should leverage technologies, engage and reengineer services to remain competitive. The paper illustrates how technology disrupts industry structures and stimulates value co-creation at the micro and macro-societal level.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Jeff Bray, Heather Hartwell, Sarah Price, Giampaolo Viglia, Grzegorz Kapuściński, Katherine Appleton, Laure Saulais, Federico J.A. Perez-Cueto and Ioannis Mavridis

Advances have been made in the provision of nutritional and ingredient information on packaged food, however, there is a need to translate this to eating out reflecting…

Abstract

Purpose

Advances have been made in the provision of nutritional and ingredient information on packaged food, however, there is a need to translate this to eating out reflecting consumer desire for greater transparency and knowledge of menu content. The purpose of this paper is to assess consumer’s preferences for food information presentation in four European countries (UK, Greece, Denmark and France) in a workplace dining setting.

Design/methodology/approach

This study focusses on workplace canteens since the regularity in which they are used provides an important context and potential for behaviour change. An exploratory phase designed iteratively in collaboration with experts, end-users and researchers (qualitative) informed a survey (quantitative) conducted in four European countries. The survey was used to examine workplace diners’ preferences towards food information presentation.

Findings

Differences were found and clustered (n=5) to “heuristic processors” (33 per cent) “brand orientated” (25 per cent) “systematic processors” (17.3 per cent) “independent processors” (16.1 per cent) and “tech-savvy” (8.6 per cent). Dual-process theories were used to analyse the findings and produce new insight into how menu information can be most effectively delivered.

Originality/value

When eating-out consumers struggle to make choices or make the wrong choice from a health perspective, partly caused by a lack of nutrient profile information as well as other criteria of concern. Giving catering managers the understanding of preferred communication channels can enable a more competitive operator. Traffic light labelling was the optimal presentation with the opportunity for consumers to discover more detailed information if desired. For the first time this research has given operational clarity whilst allowing food providers to be considered as part of corporate health.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Giampaolo Viglia, Roberta Minazzi and Dimitrios Buhalis

Online consumer reviews have become increasingly important for consumer decision-making. One of the most prominent examples is the hotel industry where consumer reviews on…

6941

Abstract

Purpose

Online consumer reviews have become increasingly important for consumer decision-making. One of the most prominent examples is the hotel industry where consumer reviews on websites, such as Bookings.com, TripAdvisor and Venere.com, play a critical role in consumers’ choice of a hotel. There have been a number of recent studies analyzing various aspects of online reviews. The purpose of this paper is to investigate their effects in terms of hotel occupancy rates.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper measures through regression analysis the impact of three dimensions of consumer reviews (i.e. review score, review variance and review volume) on the occupancy rates of 346 hotels located in Rome, isolating a number of other factors that might also affect demand.

Findings

Review score is the dimension with the highest impact. The results suggest that after controlling for other variables, a one-point increase in the review score is associated to an increase in the occupancy rate by 7.5 percentage points. Regardless the review score, the number of reviews has a positive effect, but with decreasing returns, implying that the higher the number of reviews, the lower the beneficial effect in terms of occupancy rates is.

Practical implications

The findings quantify the strong association of online reviews to occupancy rates suggesting the use of appropriate reputational management systems to increase hotel occupancy and therefore performance.

Originality/value

A major contribution of this paper is its comprehensiveness in analyzing the relation between online consumer reviews and occupancy across a heterogeneous sample of hotels.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 December 2019

Serena Volo, Noel Scott and Donna Quadri-Felitti

309

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

1 – 10 of 14