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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Myroslava Hladchenko

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the comparative analysis of the Balanced Scorecards of four higher education institutions and aims to define the general framework…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the comparative analysis of the Balanced Scorecards of four higher education institutions and aims to define the general framework of the Balanced Scorecard for the higher education institution which concerns: the structure and elements of the Balanced Scorecard; development of the Balanced Scorecards on the different levels of the management system of the higher education institution; definition of the main functions of the Balanced Scorecard which it performs in the process of the strategic management of the German higher education institutions. Balanced Scorecard is analyzed as a strategic management system that translates a higher education institution’s strategy into a comprehensive set of performance measures that provides a framework for a strategic measurement and management system.

Design/methodology/approach

The comparative content analysis of the Balanced Scorecards of one Austrian and three German higher education institutions – Johanes Gutenberg University Mainz, Münster University of Applied Sciences (Fachhochschule Münster), Cologne University of Applied Sciences (Fachhochschule Köln), Montan University Leoben.

Findings

Using a comparative analysis of the Balanced Scorecards of four higher education institutions this paper argues that Balanced Scorecard provides a systemic view of the strategy of a higher education institution. It ensures a full complex framework for implementation and controlling of the strategy and sets a basis for further learning in the process of the strategic management of the higher education institution according to the scheme “plan-do-check-act”.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides a basis for the substantial further work on the development of the general framework of the Balanced Scorecard for the higher education institution.

Practical implications

The framework presented in this paper can be used as the basis for the development of general framework of the Balanced Scorecard of the higher education institution.

Social implications

The framework presented in this paper can be used as the basis for the development of general framework of the Balanced Scorecard of the higher education institution.

Originality/value

This paper indicates the particularities of the structure and elements of the Balanced Scorecard, its development in the different levels of the management system of the higher education institution.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 April 2018

Judith Marquand and Peter Scott

Abstract

Details

Democrats, Authoritarians and the Bologna Process
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-466-0

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2016

Catherine Paradeise and Ghislaine Filliatreau

Much has been analyzed regarding the origins and the impact of rankings and metrics on policies, behaviors, and missions of universities. Surprisingly, little attention…

Abstract

Much has been analyzed regarding the origins and the impact of rankings and metrics on policies, behaviors, and missions of universities. Surprisingly, little attention has been allocated to describing and analyzing the emergence of metrics as a new action field. This industry, fueled by the “new public management” policy perspectives that operate at the backstage of the contemporary pervasive “regime of excellence,” still remains a black box worth exploring in depth. This paper intends to fill this loophole. It first sets the stage for this new action field by stressing the differences between the policy fields of higher education in the United States and Europe, as a way to understand the specificities of the use of metrics and rankings on both continents. The second part describes the actors of the field, which productive organizations they build, what skills they combine, which products they put on the market, and their shared norms and audiences.

Details

The University Under Pressure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-831-5

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Hongmei Sziegat

This study aims to reflect how German business schools respond to the diffusion of the triple accreditation: AACSB (Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business)…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reflect how German business schools respond to the diffusion of the triple accreditation: AACSB (Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business), EQUIS (European Quality Improvement System), and AMBA (Association of MBAs).

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies a multiple case study to conduct a qualitative analysis of perceived drivers, value and limitations of AACSB, EQUIS and AMBA accreditation in German business schools.

Findings

International accreditation is a seal of excellence for business schools to enhance international competitiveness and global networking, providing evidence of quality, performativity, transparency and accountability for stakeholders. International accreditation offers business schools international comparability and compatibility. International accreditation adds value and benefits to business schools. However, business schools may prioritize institutional strategies and resources to meet the requirements of international accreditations rather than a broader concept of good governance. Business schools should critically review their decisions on international accreditations in line with institutional strategic goals, mission, vision, core values and sustainable development.

Research limitations/implications

This study only focuses on international accreditations of German business schools. Further studies may focus on comparisons of national and international accreditations, impacts of international accreditation and perceptions of international accreditation from policymakers, accreditation bodies, academics and students.

Practical implications

This study offers guidance for the strategic decision-making of business schools on international accreditations, valuable feedback to international accreditation agencies and a reference for quality assurance practitioners, policymakers and accreditation bodies.

Social implications

This study discusses the social-cultural impacts of international accreditation and accreditation discrimination arising from the selectivity and the exclusivity of international accreditation. International accreditation may further enlarge their comparative advantages over non-accredited schools. International accreditation adds value and benefits to accredited business schools but puts non-accredited business schools in disadvantageous positions.

Originality/value

Business schools need to critically review their institutional strategies and decisions on international accreditation in line with institutional strategic goals, mission, vision, core values and sustainable development. The rational decision of business schools to adopt international accreditation should consider drivers, value, benefits, limitations, organizational effectiveness, transparency, social responsibility and accountability for all stakeholders. Business schools need to take effective strategies to ensure a higher quality of management education through high-quality teaching and good governance. When single accreditation is sufficient, promoting mutual recognition is advisable rather than the “beauty contests” of multiple accreditations at the national and international levels.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 29 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Uwe Wilkesmann and Christian J. Schmid

The introduction of New Public Management in the German system of higher education raises issues of the academics’ motivation to do research and to teach. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

The introduction of New Public Management in the German system of higher education raises issues of the academics’ motivation to do research and to teach. The purpose of this paper is to present evidence-based findings about contextual factors which influence intrinsic and related modes of internalized teaching motivation in German higher education institutions. The paper discusses parallels between internalized forms of motivation and public service motivation (PSM). In accordance with self-determination theory (SDT), the paper empirically tests factors which correlate with autonomous motivation to teach. The paper also addresses the issue of the crowding effect of intrinsic motivation by selective incentives.

Design/methodology/approach

The analyses are based on the data of two online surveys among German professors (n=2,061) representative for the population of state-governed universities. To test the theory-driven hypotheses the paper used multivariate regression analysis.

Findings

The results support the basic claims of the SDT that intrinsic teaching motivation is facilitated by social relatedness, competence, and partly by autonomy for German professors, too. If teaching is managed by objective agreements intrinsic motivation is significantly decreased.

Originality/value

The authors translated, reformulated, and applied the SDT framework to academic teaching. The analysis presents evidence that the management of autonomy-supportive work environmental factors is also superior to selective incentives in higher education institutions. The study on academic teaching motivation is a specific contribution to PSM research. Academic teaching in public higher education institutions is a service to the public.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Ute Krauss‐Leichert

Describes the new trends in German library and information science (LIS) education and the status of the international degrees in Germany, referring to changes to the…

Abstract

Describes the new trends in German library and information science (LIS) education and the status of the international degrees in Germany, referring to changes to the Framework Act of 1998, which enabled the institutions of higher education to award Bachelor’s degree on completion of undergraduate study courses and Master’s degree on completion of postgraduate study courses. Describes the introduction of credit point systems, the shift from a system based on the number of lecture hours to a credit system based on the number of hours of student workload. In Germany different credit point systems exist. This paper focuses on the most important model of credit point systems used by the German LIS faculties. Finally the special problems in Germany with the change from the diploma to the Bachelor and Master are mentioned.

Details

New Library World, vol. 104 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2019

Dana-Kristin Mah and Dirk Ifenthaler

The purpose of this paper is to analyse data on first-year students’ needs regarding academic support services and reasons for their intention to leave the institution

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse data on first-year students’ needs regarding academic support services and reasons for their intention to leave the institution prior to degree completion. On the basis of the findings, a digital badge outline is proposed which could contribute to improved communication of academic requirements in order to help students to better adapt to higher education demands. Digital badges might also serve as an indicator for students’ needing additional academic support services.

Design/methodology/approach

An online-questionnaire was conducted with 730 first-year students at a German university. Participants’ responses to open-ended questions were coded and categorised. On the basis on these findings, an outline for a digital badge programme is proposed.

Findings

Participants seek the most institutional support regarding research skills and organisational aspects. Main reasons for participants’ intention to withdraw from the institution include difficulties with their programme choice.

Practical implications

These findings may enable higher education institutions to provide targeted support services that meet first-year students’ needs. On the basis of the findings, higher education institutions can create digital badge programmes, which may improve communication of academic requirements and may also serve as a platform for a staff-student conversation about expectations and demands for a successful first-year experience. Besides, further research and discussion may address using digital badges for learning analytics algorithms to even better identify students’ strengths and needs for targeted academic support services and enhanced student success in higher education.

Originality/value

Little is known about first-year students’ needs for institutional support and reasons for thinking about dropout in Germany. Understanding the student perspective is crucial for enhancing student retention. Digital badges are an emerging educational technology in higher education and they have the potential to target academic requirements, which may guide first-year students and help them to better adjust to universities’ demands.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2017

Sandra Huber and Alexander Bassen

So far, sustainability reporting in higher education is in a very early stage – partly, because of the lack of an established and widely recognized sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

So far, sustainability reporting in higher education is in a very early stage – partly, because of the lack of an established and widely recognized sustainability reporting framework for higher education institutions (HEIs). Therefore, a modification of the sustainability code for the use in the higher education context was recently developed in Germany. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate this modification from an academic point of view.

Design/methodology/approach

The evaluation of the sustainability code is based on selected reporting principles drawn from frameworks of sustainability and financial reporting.

Findings

The evaluation shows that to a large extent, the modification of the sustainability code for HEIs contributes to the fulfillment of the selected reporting principles. However, it also became evident that there is still room for improvement, especially in terms of clarity and the inclusion of material aspects.

Practical implications

The need for an implementation manual regarding the modified HEI-specific sustainability code is emphasized, as the sustainability code requires further clarification to be manageable for HEIs.

Originality/value

This paper provides suggestions for the further development of a sustainability reporting guideline for HEIs to enhance its alignment with both sustainability reporting principles and the needs of HEIs.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2018

Remmer Sassen, Dominik Dienes and Johanna Wedemeier

This study aims to focus on the following research question: Which institutional characteristics are associated with sustainability reporting by UK higher education institutions?

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on the following research question: Which institutional characteristics are associated with sustainability reporting by UK higher education institutions?

Design/methodology/approach

To answer the aforementioned research question, this study uses logistic regression.

Findings

The results show that 17 per cent of the UK higher education institutions report on their sustainability (July 2014). In line with legitimacy and stakeholder theory, logistic regressions provide evidence that the larger the size of the institution, the higher the probability of reporting. By contrast, high public funding decreases this probability.

Research limitations/implications

The findings show characteristics of higher education institutions that support or hamper sustainability reporting. Overall, the findings imply a lack of institutionalisation of sustainability reporting among higher education institutions.

Originality/value

Although a lot of research has been done on corporate sustainability reporting, only a small number of studies have addressed the issues of sustainability reporting of higher education institutions. This study covers all sustainability reports disclosed among the 160 UK higher education institutions. It is the first study that investigates characteristics of higher education institutions that disclose a sustainability report.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Coco Klußmann, Remmer Sassen and Elisa Gansel

The purpose of this paper is to answer the following research question: What are the key factors of the participatory process for establishing sustainability reporting in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to answer the following research question: What are the key factors of the participatory process for establishing sustainability reporting in German universities?

Design/methodology/approach

To answer the research question, this study uses qualitative methodology, following the grounded theory approach and triangulation of qualitative methods for accessing data.

Findings

The findings show that universities face a high level of difficulty in introducing sustainability reporting, which has an external and an internal dimension.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the understanding of sustainability reporting processes of universities from an internal perspective, specifically through experts who are involved in the preparation of sustainability reports. Furthermore, it delivers insights for a theory-based discussion, which may support universities in starting sustainability reporting activities and improving reporting processes.

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