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Book part
Publication date: 24 March 2017

Gina Dokko and Geraldine A. Wu

How does career boundary-crossing affect an entrepreneur’s new venture? When entrepreneurs cross industry or functional boundaries to lead startups, they may lack specific…

Abstract

How does career boundary-crossing affect an entrepreneur’s new venture? When entrepreneurs cross industry or functional boundaries to lead startups, they may lack specific experience needed for performance. Conversely, the diverse experiences they carry can enhance exploration and lead to the emergence of innovation in startups. We highlight important consequences of career boundary-crossing, using a multi-industry longitudinal sample of high-technology firms. We find that entrepreneurs who cross functional boundaries are more likely to lead their startups into new product areas. We also find that entrepreneurs’ industry boundary-crossing is associated with startup failure, but it also increases the probability of an IPO.

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Emergence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-915-5

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Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2001

Jaeyong Song, Paul Almeida and Geraldine Wu

Does the mobility of engineers facilitate international knowledge spillovers and help newly industrializing countries catch up with developed countries? This study…

Abstract

Does the mobility of engineers facilitate international knowledge spillovers and help newly industrializing countries catch up with developed countries? This study attempts to answer this question by tracing knowledge flows through the international mobility of semiconductor engineers. The paper uses patent data to track the mobility paths of engineers to examine whether knowledge flows occurred more than expected. The study finds that engineers who moved from the U.S. to Korea or Taiwan built their subsequent innovations based upon the knowledge of their previous firms in the U.S. Case studies based on field interviews further suggest that these mobile engineers have played significant roles in the technological catching-up of Korea and Taiwan.

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Comparative Studies of Technological Evolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-118-7

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Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2001

Abstract

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Comparative Studies of Technological Evolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-118-7

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2017

Micki Eisenman

The study applies a multimodal approach to position aesthetic innovation, i.e., the strategic use of aesthetic design attributes, such as color and shape, as an…

Abstract

The study applies a multimodal approach to position aesthetic innovation, i.e., the strategic use of aesthetic design attributes, such as color and shape, as an institutionalized aspect of competition, rather than as a firm-specific differentiation strategy, in settings that favor the symbolic meanings of products. Empirically, the study offers a detailed case study of the personal computer (PC) industry to examine the institutionalization of aesthetic innovation as a dimension of competition across industrial firms. The study examines the color and shape of PCs over the 1992–2003 period and situates changes to these attributes in the competitive conditions that characterized the industry, paying particular attention to the introduction of the Apple iMac in 1998. Furthermore, it examines the discursive manifestations of aesthetic innovation by content analysis of reviews of PCs and interviews with industry executives. Findings demonstrate that, in a period coinciding with a decline in demand for PCs and an overall mature market as well as with the introduction of the iMac, the majority of firms engaged in aesthetic innovation and used a greater number of aesthetic words in describing their PCs.

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Multimodality, Meaning, and Institutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-330-4

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Abstract

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Comparative Studies of Technological Evolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-118-7

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Book part
Publication date: 24 March 2017

Abstract

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Emergence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-915-5

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Book part
Publication date: 24 March 2017

Abstract

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Emergence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-915-5

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Geraldine Kennett, Ling Hu, Alex Maritz and He Sun

This study explores the different learning practices of Chinese incubators in Chongqing and Chengdu and delves into how these “learning huddles” influence incubatees'…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the different learning practices of Chinese incubators in Chongqing and Chengdu and delves into how these “learning huddles” influence incubatees' absorptive capacity (the ability to apply knowledge) to improve their chance of success (sustainable growth).

Design/methodology/approach

This explorative study uses a qualitative case study approach by means of semi-structured interviews with business incubation managers and incubatees across three business incubators in Chengdu and Chongqing. The data are transcribed, coded and analyzed using an analytic map for the explanation of building and reflecting on the theoretical propositions, leading to a further understanding of the “learning huddle” mechanism.

Findings

The study finds that incubatees perceive that their absorptive capacity is increased through vicarious informal learning practices that promote access to networks and thereby builds social capital to improve their likelihood of success.

Research limitations/implications

This study has limitations in sample size and design. The explorative case study approach uses a nonrandom case selection of three incubators in Chongqing and Chengdu and has a limited number of interviewees, which may lack representation of the general Chinese business incubation population and may not sufficiently be generalized beyond the sample itself.

Practical implications

These findings have important implications for business incubation programs. Business incubators that build learning huddles (networks) create a nurturing shared learning environment, which is suitable for incubatees to collectively absorb knowledge at the early stage of their life cycle and improve their likelihood of sustainable growth.

Social implications

Since this study is limited to a Chinese context, it is also hoped that future researchers use the typology of business incubator learning practices to explore cross-culture variables, as these may influence the business incubation operations and performance.

Originality/value

This study adds to the discussion on how collective learning practices facilitate absorptive capacity and build social capital, which in turn improves incubatees' chance of sustainable growth and as such the authors hope that the learning practice's typology and how incubatees determine their success stimulates further research for measuring the likelihood of incubatees sustainable growth.

Details

Journal of Industry-University Collaboration, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-357X

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Geraldine Rosa Henderson, Tracy Rank-Christman, Tiffany Barnett White, Kimberly Dillon Grantham, Amy L. Ostrom and John G. Lynch

Intercultural competence has been found to be increasingly important. The purpose of this paper is to understand how intercultural competence impacts service providers…

Abstract

Purpose

Intercultural competence has been found to be increasingly important. The purpose of this paper is to understand how intercultural competence impacts service providers’ ability to recognition faces of both black and white consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments were administered to understand how intercultural competence impacts recognition of black and white consumer faces.

Findings

The authors find that the more intercultural competence that respondents report with blacks, the better they are at distinguishing between black regular customers and black new shoppers in an experiment. The authors find no impact of intercultural competence on the ability of respondents to differentiate between white consumers. These findings hold for respondents in the USA and South Africa.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation of this research is that the studies were conducted in a controlled lab setting. Thus, one could imagine additional noise from a true consumer setting might increase the effects of these results. Another limitation is the focus on only black and white consumer faces. In this paper, the authors focused on these two races, specifically to keep the factorial design as simplified as possible.

Originality/value

The implications of this research are important given that the ability of employees’ recognizing customer faces can affect customers’ day-to-day interactions in the marketplace.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Michelle Sandoval-Rosario, Theresa Marie Hunter, Adrienne Durnham, Antoniette Holt, Pam Pontones and Geraldine Perry

Migrant and seasonal farmworkers (MSFWs) have many health challenges due to the nature of their work, low wages, living conditions, mobility, and lack of health insurance…

Abstract

Purpose

Migrant and seasonal farmworkers (MSFWs) have many health challenges due to the nature of their work, low wages, living conditions, mobility, and lack of health insurance. The purpose of this paper is to assess the availability of health services, barriers to accessing health care, and the prevalence of chronic conditions among MSFWs in Indiana.

Design/methodology/approach

A site-based convenience sample of MSFWs aged 14 years and older completed a cross-sectional survey. A total of 97 participants who currently or previously identified as farmworkers completed the questionnaire.

Findings

Almost one-third of the respondents reported no access to a health care provider. Of those, 43 percent reported that cost prevented them from seeking care. Of those who reported chronic conditions ( n=22), over 50 percent did not have access to a health care provider. These findings highlight the need to further investigate the magnitude of the problem and begin exploring ways to improve affordable health care access among MSFWs in Northeastern Indiana.

Originality/value

The results from this study highlight the need for the development and implementation of community health education programs that target MSFWs in Indiana. The findings, although not generalized, offer important insights into health care challenges and barriers to access in Indiana. The authors recommend that assistance programs should be implemented for providing affordable health care services for Hispanic MSFWs.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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