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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Justin Doran and Geraldine Ryan

Eco-innovation is any form of product, process or organisational innovation that contributes towards sustainable development. Firms can eco-innovate in a variety of ways…

Abstract

Purpose

Eco-innovation is any form of product, process or organisational innovation that contributes towards sustainable development. Firms can eco-innovate in a variety of ways. The purpose of this paper is to identify nine different eco-innovation activities – including such items as reducing material use per unit of output, reducing energy use per unit of output, reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) “footprint” – and the authors ask whether these act as substitutes or complements to one another.

Design/methodology/approach

Eco-innovation is any form of product, process or organisational innovation that contributes towards sustainable development. Firms can eco-innovate in a variety of ways. In this paper the authors identify nine different eco-innovation activities – including such items as reducing material use per unit of output, reducing energy use per unit of output, reducing CO2 “footprint” – and the authors ask whether these act as substitutes or complements to one another.

Findings

Introducing only one eco-innovation activity has little payoff (in terms of turnover per worker) with only those firms who reduce their CO2 “footprint” having higher levels of turnover per worker. When introducing more than one eco-innovation activity the authors find that certain eco-innovation activities complement one another (e.g. reducing material use within the firm at the same time as improving the ability to recycle the product after use) others act as substitutes (e.g. reducing material use within the firm at the same time as recycling waste, water or materials within the firm).

Practical implications

The results suggest that firms can maximise their productive capacity by considering specific combinations of eco-innovation. This suggests that firms should plan to introduce eco-innovation which act as complements, thereby, boosting productivity. It also suggests that eco-innovation stimuli, introduced by policy makers, should be targeted at complementary eco-innovations.

Originality/value

The paper analyses whether eco-innovations act as complements or substitutes. While a number of studies have analysed the importance of eco-innovation for firm performance, few have assessed the extent to which diverse types of eco-innovation interact with each other to complement or substitute for one another.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 41 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Justin Doran and Geraldine Ryan

Recent reports argue that eco‐innovation is the key to realising growth. The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors which drive eco‐innovation and test if…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent reports argue that eco‐innovation is the key to realising growth. The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors which drive eco‐innovation and test if eco‐innovating firms perform better than non‐eco‐innovating firms. The paper provides insights into the role government regulation can play in directing and stimulating eco‐innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach utilised by this paper is empirical in nature. Using a sample of 2,181 firms, gathered as part of the Irish Community Survey 2006‐2008, the authors estimate a modified innovation production function in order to assess the impact of regulation, consumer expectations and voluntary agreements on the performance of eco‐innovation, subsequently a knowledge augmented production function is estimated to assess the impact of eco‐innovation on firm performance.

Findings

The findings suggest that regulation and customer perception can explain a firm's decision to engage in eco‐innovation. Eco‐innovation is also found to be more important than non‐eco‐innovation in determining firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the limited availability of accounting data this paper uses turnover per worker as the measure of firm performance. As a result, it is not possible to assess the impact of eco‐innovation on firm costs.

Social implications

The finding that regulation drives eco‐innovation, and that there is no trade‐off between eco‐innovation and higher profit margins for innovating firms, suggests that regulators and policy makers can stimulate growth and create a greener society.

Originality/value

This paper provides an empirical analysis of the Porter and van der Linde's theory of environmental regulation and firm performance using novel real world data from over 2,000 Irish businesses.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Barbara Bigliardi and Massimo Bertolini

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Leigh-ann L. Onnis and Geraldine Dyer

The purpose of this paper is to examine the supportive aspects of a team approach for a remote mental health team that report high stability in senior clinical roles, in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the supportive aspects of a team approach for a remote mental health team that report high stability in senior clinical roles, in a region where voluntary turnover is typically high.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative research study examines the reflections of team members on their role and job characteristics through informal semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The extant themes identified as supportive aspects of the team approach included engagement and both personal and professional support. The intrinsic role of support in remote work environments, and the impact of intrinsic job satisfaction through client-focussed practices further supported low turnover, improved stability and consistency of service provision.

Originality/value

Continued support for existing experienced health professionals will contribute to workforce stability in remote regions where needs are complex and continuity of care is improved by consistent, reliable services. With health professionals working in remote Australia reporting high levels of job satisfaction; it follows that the next steps involve minimising dissatisfaction through effective workforce support mechanisms. Health professionals already working in remote regions, suggest that this is about engagement and personal and professional support through flexible work systems. While the findings of this study may not be generalisable, the authors suggest that these supportive aspects are transferable to other multi-disciplinary team settings.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2015

Anthony Beudaert, Nil Özçağlar-Toulouse and Meltem Türe

This paper aims at revealing the process of identity reconstruction for individuals who have acquired sensory disabilities, as well as the contribution of consumption to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at revealing the process of identity reconstruction for individuals who have acquired sensory disabilities, as well as the contribution of consumption to this process.

Methodology/approach

The data was collected through both interviews conducted in France and autobiographical accounts.

Findings

When disability occurs, individuals go through a rite of passage that shapes their identity reconstruction process. Two forms of liminality appear: acute and sustained liminality. These phases can foster or hamper individuals’ identity reconstruction.

Research limitations/implications

The mechanisms leading from one stage of the identity reconstruction process to another should be deepened through further research.

Practical/social implications

Given the fluctuating behaviors of consumers with disabilities, especially in view of their identity reconstruction process, this research encourages retailers and public policy actors not to consider them as a homogeneous consumer segment.

Originality/value

While scholars dealing with consumers with disabilities have mainly focused on the accessibility of the marketplace, this research disentangles their identity issues.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-323-5

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Abstract

Details

Emotion and the Researcher: Sites, Subjectivities, and Relationships
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-611-2

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2019

Pooja Malik and Usha Lenka

In a world of fast-changing markets, corporate brand is the heart and soul of a company. A company’s employees are crucial in nourishing a successful corporate image…

Abstract

Purpose

In a world of fast-changing markets, corporate brand is the heart and soul of a company. A company’s employees are crucial in nourishing a successful corporate image. Eventually, organizations require committed employees who orient their energy and drive the company toward a shared vision. However, employees’ deviant behavior can cripple the organization’s brand image. Given this fact, the purpose of this study is to offer strategies that can play a vital role in overcoming destructive deviance and in turn fostering the pavement for building a strong corporate brand image.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the purpose, this study used systematic review of literature to analyze the newspaper articles that reported the cases of deviant behaviors exhibited by employees of “Air India” and were published between 2015 and 2017. Further, this study used document analysis to identify and categorize the various forms of deviant behaviors exhibited by employees of Air India.

Findings

The current study asserted four chief interventions, namely, talent management strategies, resilience, workplace spirituality and mindfulness to overcome destructive deviance and promote constructive behavior among employees of Air India.

Research limitations/implications

The present study offers vital implications for organizations to curb the escalating deviant behavior among employees in the hospitality industry. These interventions might lay a significant pavement for fostering positive emotions among employees, which in turn could play a crucial role in enhancing service quality and building a strong brand image.

Originality/value

Given the mounting cases of deviant behavior among employees, the present study draws attention to the necessity for a shift in the generic organizational strategies and instigates organizations to integrate the study’s strategies to curb deviant behavior and in turn build a strong corporate image.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 74 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Abstract

Details

Research in Consumer Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-022-2

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Abstract

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Mustafa F. Özbilgin

Abstract

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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