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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Nurul Alam and Pragya Pandey

This paper aims to describe a model to provide a mechanism for the development of a union catalogue for geoscience theses based on open source software (GSDL) and to show…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a model to provide a mechanism for the development of a union catalogue for geoscience theses based on open source software (GSDL) and to show how libraries can use open source as a vehicle for promoting library services. It is used for the geoscience community and educational users in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The system is based on open source software (GSDL, Apache, PERL, JRE). GeoTheses can be used both in offline mode (i.e. self‐installable CD‐ROM) and online through the web.

Findings

The findings of this study suggest that GeoTheses can serve as an online distributed digital library for geoscience theses held in India and will enhance the geoscience research activity by providing nascent information pinpointedly, exhaustively and expeditiously.

Research limitation/implications

This is a pilot study, with the only limitation being that very few samples have been considered. This will be investigated further with a wider population, which will improve the GeoTheses system.

Practical implications

These results suggest that a system like GeoTheses could be used by the geoscience research communities, which would help to serve students and scientists working in the field to access information from other geoscience institutes around the world quickly.

Originality/value

The paper describes the application of open source software, GSDL as a form of resource sharing, an electronic archive and a high quality, central database of records for geosciences theses in India.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2019

Michael Petterson, Lanka Nanayakkara, Norgay Konchok, Rebecca Norman, Sonam Wangchuk and Malin Linderoth

The purpose of this paper is to apply the concept of “Interconnected Geoscience” to a disaster and risk reduction (DRR) case study at SECMOL College, near Leh, Ladakh, N…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the concept of “Interconnected Geoscience” to a disaster and risk reduction (DRR) case study at SECMOL College, near Leh, Ladakh, N. India. Interconnected geoscience is a model that advocates holistic approaches to geoscience for development. This paper reports research/practical work with Ladakhi students/staff, undertaking community-oriented DRR exercises in hazard awareness, DRR themed village/college mapping, vulnerability assessments and DRR management scenario development. The geoscientific hazard analysis work is published within a separate sister paper, with results feeding into this work. This work addresses aspects of, and contributes to, the DRR research(science)-policy-interface conversation.

Design/methodology/approach

Interconnected geoscience methodologies for DRR here are: the application of geoscience for hazard causality, spatial distribution, frequency and impact assessment, for earthquakes, floods and landslides, within the SECMOL area; the generation of community-developed DRR products and services of use to a range of end-users; the development of a contextual geoscience approach, informed by social-developmental-issues; and the active participation of SECMOL students/teachers and consequent integration of local world-views and wisdom within DRR research. Initial DRR awareness levels of students were assessed with respect to earthquakes/floods/landslides/droughts. Following hazard teaching sessions, students engaged in a range of DRR exercises, and produced DRR themed maps, data, tables and documented conversations of relevance to DRR management.

Findings

Students levels of hazard awareness were variable, generally low for low-frequency hazards (e.g. earthquakes) and higher for hazards such as floods/landslides which either are within recent memory, or have higher frequencies. The 2010 Ladakhi flood disaster has elevated aspects of flood-hazard knowledge. Landslides and drought hazards were moderately well understood. Spatial awareness was identified as a strength. The application of an interconnected geoscience approach immersed within a student+staff college community, proved to be effective, and can rapidly assess/build upon awareness levels and develop analytical tools for the further understanding of DRR management. This approach can assist Ladakhi regional DRR management in increasing the use of regional capability/resources, and reducing the need for external inputs.

Practical implications

A series of recommendations for the DRR geoscience/research-policy-practice area include: adopting an “interconnected geoscience” approach to DRR research, involving scientific inputs to DRR; using and developing local capability and resources for Ladakhi DRR policy and practice; using/further-developing DRR exercises presented in this paper, to integrate science with communities, and further-empower communities; taking account of the findings that hazard awareness is variable, and weak, for potentially catastrophic hazards, such as earthquakes, when designing policy and practice for raising DRR community awareness; ensuring that local values/world views/wisdom inform all DRR research, and encouraging external “experts” to carefully consider these aspects within Ladakh-based DRR work; and further-developing DRR networks across Ladakh that include pockets of expertise such as SECMOL.

Originality/value

The term “interconnected geoscience” is highly novel, further developing thinking within the research/science-policy-practice interface. This is the first time an exercise such as this has been undertaken in the Ladakh Himalaya.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2017

Jaana Pinnick

The aim of this paper was to explore digital preservation requirements within the wider National Geoscience Data Centre (NGDC) organisational framework in preparation for…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper was to explore digital preservation requirements within the wider National Geoscience Data Centre (NGDC) organisational framework in preparation for developing a preservation policy and integrating associated preservation workflows throughout the existing research data management processes. This case study is based on an MSc dissertation research undertaken at Northumbria University.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed methods case study used quantitative and qualitative data to explore the preservation requirements and triangulation to strengthen the design validity. Corporate and the wider scientific priorities were identified through literature and a stakeholder survey. Organisational preparedness was investigated through staff interviews.

Findings

Stakeholders expect data to be reliable, reusable and available in preferred formats. To ensure digital continuity, the creation of high-quality metadata is critical, and data depositors need data management training to achieve this. Recommendations include completing a risk assessment, creating a digital asset register and a technology watch to mitigate against risks.

Research limitations/implications

The main constraint in this study is the lack of generalisability of results. As the NGDC is a unique organisation, it may not be possible to generalise the organisational findings, although those relating to research data management may be transferrable.

Originality/value

This research examines the specific nature of geoscience data retention requirements and looks at existing NGDC procedures in terms of enhancing digital continuity, providing new knowledge on the preservation requirements for a number of national datasets.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2007

Mehri‐e‐ Sedighi

The purpose of this paper is to provide a report on the application of a Geographic Information System (GIS), ArcInfo, in the cataloguing of geosciences documents held by IRANDOC.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a report on the application of a Geographic Information System (GIS), ArcInfo, in the cataloguing of geosciences documents held by IRANDOC.

Design/methodology/approach

The steps involved in the application are described: gathering the data and required input including the attribute and spatial information; pre‐processing the information; managing and analysing the data; producing outputs.

Findings

This research resulted in establishing a complete and comprehensive database of the geosciences, illustrating, analysing and reviewing all types of data available in the various databases of IRANDOC (geosciences related) simultaneously and easily.

Research limitations/implications

Although this investigation concentrates on very specific documents (the geosciences documents held by IRANDOC), its findings and the presented model of the plan can be generalised to collections of information related to the spatial position in some other areas.

Originality/value

In addition to quick and correct access to the data required in abundant volume, the spatial and subject data can be depicted in the forms of maps, tables and diagrams and also can be edited, updated and used in various ways. Also the way can be paved for identification and introduction of the various similar systems in different geographical areas.

Details

Program, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Knut Alstad and Morten Hertzum

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how often geoscientists use different information sources and how this pattern of source use balances their perceptions of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how often geoscientists use different information sources and how this pattern of source use balances their perceptions of the quality and ease of use of the information sources.

Design/methodology/approach

The geoscientists at the Geological Survey of Norway were surveyed about their information-seeking behavior. The response rate was 70 percent.

Findings

The geoscientists primarily relied on web search and colleagues for information. These two information sources were perceived as easy to use, more so than bibliographic databases (GeoRef, Web of Science, and the library database). Bibliographic databases were used infrequently and perceived as yielding poorer quality results than consulting a colleague. The likelihood of using web search and colleagues to find information about a new topic was determined by the ease of using these sources. In contrast, the quality of the resulting information did not determine the frequency with which any of the information sources were used. The geoscientists who spent more time looking for information searched the web more often, had more reservations toward the quality of information obtained from colleagues, and read more journal articles and conference papers.

Research limitations/implications

Geoscientists’ use of an information source is self-reinforcing and unlikely to increase through improving its quality alone. It should be noted that the study is restricted to one geoscience organization.

Originality/value

The main reference about the information-seeking behavior of geoscientists is almost three decades old. This study provides an update.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 74 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

April M. Love

Outlines the topics covered at the 2003 National Meeting of the GeoScience Information Society (GSIS) in Seattle, November 2003, which also included the announcement of…

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Abstract

Outlines the topics covered at the 2003 National Meeting of the GeoScience Information Society (GSIS) in Seattle, November 2003, which also included the announcement of the launch of GeoScience World, an aggregator resource for research and communications in geological and earth sciences on the Internet.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Gerry McKiernan

This article aims to describe GeoScienceWorld™: a premier science portal.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to describe GeoScienceWorld™: a premier science portal.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is prepared by a library professional and provides a summary of the main features. Findings – GeoScienceWorld (GSW) is a comprehensive, widely‐accessible, easy to use, integrated, and cost‐effective online resource for journals in the geological and earth sciences. (GSW) provides access to scientifically peer‐reviewed full‐text articles from high impact geoscience publications with linking between cited references and articles within the GSW database and outside of GSW through CrossRef. “It is a comprehensive internet resource for research and communications in the geosciences, built on a core database aggregation of peer‐reviewed journals indexed, linked, and interoperable with GeoRef”.

Originality/value

This article is a useful summary of a development of interest to library and information management professionals.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Plato Smith II, Tanu Malik and Gary Berg-Cross

The EarthCube Technology and Architecture Committee working groups needed current information on the development of existing EarthCube-funded projects (e.g. building…

Abstract

Purpose

The EarthCube Technology and Architecture Committee working groups needed current information on the development of existing EarthCube-funded projects (e.g. building blocks, conceptual designs, and research coordination networks) to fulfill the goals of the working groups (e.g. gap analysis, use cases, standards bodies and testbed). The aims of this study include a compilation of planned outcomes, an assessment of current work and an investigation of interests in research collaboration among select EarthCube-funded projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Twenty-four principal investigators of 24 different EarthCube projects completed the Funded Projects Questionnaire composed of 35 questions in March and April 2015.

Findings

The survey response rate was 100 per cent and included a diversity of results ranging from planning stages to early development to final development. The funded projects in this study received awards in 2013 and 2014.

Research limitations/implications

The results are EarthCube-specific and are not generalizable. Suggestions for future research include integration of crosscutting disciplines and perspectives, best practices, guidelines and standards for broader impact.

Practical implications

This study identified potential collaboration opportunities, use cases and gaps (e.g. unmet architectural, functional, operational, organizational and/or technical needs).

Social implications

The impact on society include an improved understanding of the various EarthCube-funded projects and potential for collaboration within and across multiple disciplines.

Originality/value

This study contributed to the development of select outputs for EarthCube-funded projects’ presentations, Tech Hands Meeting, 2015 All Hands Meeting, select working groups’ outcomes and EarthCube Strategic Technology Plan and is of value to stakeholders, scientists and users.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2017

Angélick Schweizer, Sébastien Miserez, Maria del Rio Carral and Marie Santiago-Delefosse

This study aims to deepen the authors’ understanding of higher education students’ perceptions about sustainability issues by focusing on their motivations to adopt (or…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to deepen the authors’ understanding of higher education students’ perceptions about sustainability issues by focusing on their motivations to adopt (or not to adopt) sustainable practices in their lives. It mobilized the notion of “health” and the potential impacts of climate change on health.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative and participatory action approach, involving students acting as researchers, was implemented. All psychology students (bachelor’s degree) were trained to conduct semi-directive interviews with students from other faculties on the issues of sustainability and health. In total, 203 interviews were completed within two academic years. The authors performed a lexicographic analysis followed by a thematic analysis.

Findings

Analyses showed that the concept of sustainability was unclear for most student interviewees (SIs) and that only a few of them were able to spontaneously connect it with health. Only after being guided throughout the interview did these SIs, mainly geoscience students, become progressively aware of the direct links between sustainability and health issues, such as personal health. The perceived risks of non-sustainable practices were higher when they directly affected the body itself, and this encouraged adoption of more sustainable practices.

Originality/value

This research enables the authors to identify specific interventions to decrease the gap between awareness of sustainability and sustainable practices. These interventions may be more effective if they aim to sensitize students to the direct impacts of non-sustainable practices on their personal health. This can be made possible by using creative learning activities that involve active participation of students.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Brian B. Carpenter

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79

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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