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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2019

Greg Wood, Georgina Whyatt, Michael Callaghan and Goran Svensson

This study aims to compare the content of the codes of ethics of the top 50 corporations in the UK and Australia.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to compare the content of the codes of ethics of the top 50 corporations in the UK and Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

The code of each of the 50 top companies listed on the London Stock Exchange and the 50 top companies listed on the Australian Stock Exchange based on market capitalization was read against an updated version of a previous code content classification system.

Findings

This research provides valuable insights into the similarities and differences that exist between the expected ethical standards in corporations based in two historically linked and culturally related countries: corporate approaches that are worthy of comment.

Research limitations/implications

This paper does provide a sound basis for further investigation and cross-country comparisons of corporate codes of ethics.

Practical implications

The instrument used for classifying code content gives an insight into the top companies operating in the UK and Australia and what they consider important to cover within a code of ethics.

Social implications

In light of increasing societal expectations of corporate ethical standards, this research study offers improved understanding of/insight into the development of codes of ethics as a means to guide organizational behaviours/conduct.

Originality/value

This study proposes a contemporary instrument for the analysis of codes of ethics that has built upon the work of others over the past 30 years.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Georgina Whyatt, Greg Wood and Michael Callaghan

The purpose of this research is to determine the commitment to business ethics in UK corporations. This study reports on the responses of those organizations that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to determine the commitment to business ethics in UK corporations. This study reports on the responses of those organizations that participated in the survey and possessed a code of ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

An unsolicited questionnaire was sent to the top 500 private sector organizations by market capitalization in the UK. A total of 92 companies responded, of which 56 possessed a code of ethics.

Findings

The empirical findings indicate that the processes involved in developing business ethics commitment have begun to be recognized and acted upon at an organizational level. The supporting measures of business ethics commitment appear to be under‐utilized by many of these UK organizations. This suggests that many organizations have not so far developed a strong organizational commitment to embedding their codes of ethics into organizational practices.

Research limitations/implications

While the responses provided a rich picture of organizational actions, further research exploring internal culture and attitudes would add to an understanding of organizational commitment.

Practical implications

It is found that in order to influence practice, it is not enough to have the artefacts of an ethical culture, such as codes, without ensuring that all employees are assisted in understanding what is required of them.

Originality/value

Despite a history of business ethics research, there are a limited number of studies seeking to understand UK companies' commitment to ethical codes. The paper provides guidance on steps that organizations can take to develop a higher level of commitment.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2010

Georgina Whyatt and Ralph Koschek

There is a stream of literature which implies that for supermarkets, as organisations that operate with low staff‐customer interaction, within a price competitive…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a stream of literature which implies that for supermarkets, as organisations that operate with low staff‐customer interaction, within a price competitive environment and are dependent on high economies of scale, the return on investment in a relationship marketing (RM) approach does not justify the expense. The purpose of this paper is to explore how supermarkets select and implement RM strategies and seek value from that investment.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth, semi‐structured interviews were undertaken with senior marketing managers in German and UK supermarkets. The interview themes were drawn from the RM literature. Loyalty frameworks provided guidelines for the data analysis.

Findings

The results suggest that definitions of RM have historically been too narrow due to research having been focussed on the sectors with a high‐service element and undertaken at a time when customer data collection and analysis were more expensive than currently. In addition to those already identified in the literature, further factors into which retailers could invest to build an RM strategy are suggested.

Research limitations/implications

The marketing perspective of only seven supermarkets was examined. Future researchers should undertake a more exhaustive approach in order to fully establish how the management of RM in one sector differs from that in another.

Practical implications

A “retail RM mix” framework was developed and guidelines for the cost‐effective management of RM are provided.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine supermarkets' perspectives on RM approaches, by seeking responses from the retailers rather than the customers.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Georgina Whyatt

Town centre management has gained recognition as a mechanism for urban renewal. The partnership between the private (mainly retailers) and the public (local authority…

Abstract

Town centre management has gained recognition as a mechanism for urban renewal. The partnership between the private (mainly retailers) and the public (local authority) sectors has become accepted as a vital ingredient in achieving vitality and viability. The town centre management model has evolved from a tactical to a strategic role. This paper considers how current theory can inform the task of creating sustainable competitive advantage for an urban area. It discusses how the frameworks of partnership and services marketing should be adapted in order to meet the needs and expectations of today's consumer. The conclusion outlines how the management of urban areas can be more effective, now that the concept of town centre management has matured.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Adelina Broadbridge

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2010

Gill Wright and Michael Harker

Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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