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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2022

Alexander Svanidze and Montserrat Costa-Font

There is limited participatory research, including, organic winemakers and none with natural winemakers. To get a preliminary insight into the perspectives of Georgian…

Abstract

Purpose

There is limited participatory research, including, organic winemakers and none with natural winemakers. To get a preliminary insight into the perspectives of Georgian natural winemakers, this research aims to identify their perceptions regarding the major problems facing Georgia’s wine industry by applying Q-methodology. The research uncovers two existing perspectives and provides relevant policy suggestions for the Georgian wine sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This research applied Q-methodology. Ten in-person Q-sorts and interviews were carried out in Georgia, with five natural winemakers filling out an additional follow-up survey rating 26 possible policy recommendations to increase the relevance of the study’s findings.

Findings

The study revealed two groups of winemakers: the idealists and the pragmatists. The idealists are characterised by their focus on environmental awareness and a lack of trust of government institutions. The pragmatists focus on production-related issues, such as lack of financing and lack of irrigation infrastructure. The development of a local wine bottle supplier, regulation of agro-chemical use and a leading role for natural winemakers in teaching about organic viticulture were the most positively rated policy recommendations.

Practical implications

Using the research results, relevant sectoral policies can be drawn up that support the sustainable development of Georgia’s wine sector and help with the establishment of Georgian wine on the international market.

Social implications

The growth of natural winemaking through small-scale producers could improve the environmental sustainability of the wine industry in Georgia, as well as reduce rural poverty through increased rural household income and employment.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no participatory research currently exists that includes natural winemakers and their attitudes, and there are no participative studies with Georgian winemakers. This is the first study, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, to apply Q-methodology and a follow-up survey exclusively to Georgian natural winemakers and provides a first insight into their perceptions.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Nino Dzotsenidze

Post-apartheid Africa and post-Soviet Georgia implemented a variety of education reforms since the 1990s. Many of these reforms exhibit recognizable similarities despite…

Abstract

Post-apartheid Africa and post-Soviet Georgia implemented a variety of education reforms since the 1990s. Many of these reforms exhibit recognizable similarities despite the significant contextual differences between the two countries. This paper examined the school decentralization process framed by the world culture theory and compared how the enactment of reforms was influenced by country contexts. It focused on the development of regional administrative units and school governance in these two countries to illustrate how specific reforms may have structural similarities but be functionally different. The scope and depth of the functions of new educational structures also play an important role in understanding how they respond to local needs.

Details

Cross-nationally Comparative, Evidence-based Educational Policymaking and Reform
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-767-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 July 2010

S. Neil MacFarlane

This chapter examines the relationship between state failure, state-building and regional security through a thick qualitative and historical analysis of a single case…

Abstract

This chapter examines the relationship between state failure, state-building and regional security through a thick qualitative and historical analysis of a single case: the Russia–Georgia relationship. Its principal finding is that the two sides’ conceptions of state-building contained incompatible identity projects that significantly increased the potential for conflict. This potential emerged in the context of a highly asymmetrical distribution of power in the region. The balancing strategies that Georgia pursued to compensate for this asymmetry aggravated the relationship further and were significant in provoking the August 2008 war between the two states. In making this argument, the chapter begins with a discussion of the relationship between state-building and security. It then turns to an account of the near failure and recovery of the two states and a discussion of the relationship between their state-building projects. It proceeds to situate this unit-level analysis in the regional systemic context. After a discussion of the war itself, the chapter provides concluding remarks on the implications of the conflict for regional security and for the wider discussion of state-building and security. The major implication is that, although state-building is seen as a domestic endeavour, the way in which the project is defined and develops has significant external and regional implications, which may enhance the potential for inter-state conflict. As such, international engagement should take account of the regional environment in efforts to foster the re-building of states.

Details

Troubled Regions and Failing States: The Clustering and Contagion of Armed Conflicts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-102-3

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Mary Eleanor Rawlings Wickersham and Robert Yehl

The tenuous financial viability of many of Georgia’s rural hospitals has driven increased scrutiny of the hospital authorities (HAs) that own and govern them. HAs are a…

Abstract

Purpose

The tenuous financial viability of many of Georgia’s rural hospitals has driven increased scrutiny of the hospital authorities (HAs) that own and govern them. HAs are a type of “special district” established in state law to allow for specialization of function, while evading statutes that can limit local government borrowing and multi-year contracts. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a case example to introduce transparency and accountability in one local Georgia hospital and expands to include a descriptive analysis of transparency measures in 29 rural Georgia HAs.

Findings

Findings indicate that, like many other special districts in Georgia and the USA, Georgia’s rural HAs often act more like private entities than the public organizations they are. The lack of transparency demonstrated in this sector limits access to public information and reduces opportunities for citizen engagement, a necessary component of representative institutions.

Research limitations/implications

This case study is limited to Georgia HAs; however, the data support the lack of accountability and transparency found in many special district governments.

Originality/value

The lack of transparency in all of the organizations reviewed in this study demonstrates blurred lines between between public matters and private interests and raises questions of transparency, a key value in democracies.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Cary Christian and Jonathan Bush

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the Great Recession on small- to medium-sized municipalities within the states of Georgia and Florida using a newly…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the Great Recession on small- to medium-sized municipalities within the states of Georgia and Florida using a newly developed set of quantitative indices.

Design/methodology/approach

An examination of the methods and strategies utilized by individual cities to maintain public service levels despite distressed revenues is performed. From the data, performance measures are developed and used to evaluate the efficacy of the various strategies used by the cities. Outcomes of Georgia municipalities were compared to similarly sized Florida municipalities to study how underlying differences in tax structures and economies might have affected those outcomes.

Findings

Georgia and Florida municipalities relied on very different strategies for surviving the recession and its aftermath. Enterprise activities were critically important in both states with transfers to or from governmental activities rationalized in various ways. While Georgia is generally anti-property tax, more than half the Georgia municipalities relied on property tax increases to survive. Municipalities were unable to count on increased intergovernmental revenues during the recession. Finally, even with a tourist activity advantage, Florida municipalities fared only marginally better during and just after the recession, and fared worse four to six years post-recession.

Practical implications

The measures developed in this study provide a new, customizable methodology for the evaluation of financial condition that does not require in-depth comparisons to peers.

Social implications

Small- and medium-sized cities, and especially those in rural areas, are worthy of targeted research to better understand their unique problems.

Originality/value

This research is novel in utilizing a fiscal condition methodology that can be applied to a single municipality and does not require comparisons to peers for validity. However, it represents a very intuitive and customizable tool for making comparisons between municipalities of any size when such comparisons are desired. Additionally, the focus of this study is on small- to medium-sized municipalities which generally do not receive as much research attention as larger cities.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Shalva Tabatadze

– This paper aims to explore the multicultural education strategies employed by primary school teachers in Georgia.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the multicultural education strategies employed by primary school teachers in Georgia.

Design/methodology/approach

In-depth interviews with 65 primary school teachers were used. The interviews were analyzed using the theoretical framework of multicultural educational approaches defined by James Banks. The approaches used by Georgian teachers were classified into four approaches to multicultural education: contributions, additive, transformation and social action approaches.

Findings

The research revealed that the majority of teachers use the contributions and additive approaches to multicultural education. The use of the transformation approach by teachers is very rare and only happens if school textbooks, as well as exercises and assignments in the textbooks, provide this opportunity. The social action approach to multicultural education has not been used in primary grades in Georgia. The research revealed that some teachers reject diversity in their classroom as well as the necessity of developing their students’ intercultural sensitivity. These teachers have an informed and conscious approach to not using multicultural approaches in the teaching process. This approach is named by the author as the “inactive action approach”, which is specific to Georgia and is widely used in primary school classes.

Practical implications

The study has scientific and practical importance. The findings of this study also have practical importance. They can be used for the implementation of teacher education and training programs in Georgia. Consideration of these findings will contribute to the implementation of the National Objectives of General Education and the National Curriculum of Georgia.

Originality/value

This study makes contribution to the development of the field of multicultural education in Georgia.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 May 2020

Brian Lanahan

Higher education in the Republic of Georgia has experienced a massive isomorphic transformation since the Rose Revolution of 2003 and continues to transform with…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education in the Republic of Georgia has experienced a massive isomorphic transformation since the Rose Revolution of 2003 and continues to transform with aspirations toward Euro-Atlantic integration, compliance with the Bologna Process and as a reflection of the Europeanization of its higher education sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This literature review documents and analyzes literature published between 1991 and 2019 on the development of higher education in the Republic of Georgia from 2003 to 2019.

Findings

The findings reflect the evolving political landscape and aspiration for Euro-Atlantic integration against the backdrop of one of the most impoverished education systems in the world, as measured by percentage of gross domestic product spending. More explicitly, what findings have been reported in the international literature on Georgian higher education from 2003 to 2019?

Research limitations/implications

The choice to review only English publications was deliberate and done after consultation with a leading Georgian scholar, who noted that the Georgian language publishing market is small and of varied quality; leading Georgian scholars most often seek to publish in English journals and books, and all technical and policy reports produced by the Minister of Education, NGOs and large international organizations (e.g. World Bank) are available in English.

Originality/value

This literature review documents and analyzes literature on the development of higher education in the Republic of Georgia from 2003 to 2019 as a reflection of the evolving political landscape and aspiration for Euro-Atlantic integration against the backdrop of one of the most impoverished education systems in the world, as measured by percentage of gross domestic product (GDP) spending. This unique political and economic history makes higher education in Georgia worthy of review.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

J. Ruben Boling, Donna Taylor Mayo and Marilyn M. Helms

Mergers in higher education seem to be more common as academic institutions work to control costs and avoid program duplications in challenging economic times and adopt…

Abstract

Purpose

Mergers in higher education seem to be more common as academic institutions work to control costs and avoid program duplications in challenging economic times and adopt the more common cost saving measures often espoused from business mergers. The purpose of this paper is to highlight successes from a complementarity-based merger of two institutions in the University System of Georgia (USG) and present results over time.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study methodology was employed to explain why a particular merger resulted in greater growth compared to other system-wide academic mergers. This research focuses on a single merger of two institutions in Georgia, one of seven such mergers in the USG institutions to date, involving Gainesville State College and North Georgia College and State University to become the University of North Georgia. Observations are made and complimented by secondary data to rank growth among the seven USG consolidations.

Findings

The case findings highlight the success from the complementarity of these institutions. While the two were unique institutions, the success of the merger was linked to the underlying complementarity issues.

Originality/value

Using the strategic issues inherent in mergers from the business literature, the merger of the two institutions is profiled and discussion and recommendations are provided along with areas for future research.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Liz Thach, Steve Cuellar, Janeen Olsen and Tom Atkin

The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast wine sales in neighboring franchise law and non‐franchise law states in order to determine impact on wine price…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast wine sales in neighboring franchise law and non‐franchise law states in order to determine impact on wine price, consumer choice, consumer satisfaction, and stakeholder perception.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used qualitative interviews with 14 wineries, distributors, and retailers, statistical analysis of Nielsen Scantrack data, and an online survey of 401 wine consumers in Georgia and Florida, USA.

Findings

Results show statistical proof that Florida offers more wine selection and lower wine prices on matching brands than Georgia. Qualitative interviews indicate wineries, distributors, and retailers perceive differences in wine choice, price, and overall operating costs in these two states. However, there was no statistical difference between a sample of 401 consumers from Georgia and Florida when asked about their satisfaction level with wine choice and pricing within their state.

Research limitations/implications

For practical purposes, the research was limited to only two US states. It would be useful to duplicate this study in other states.

Practical implications

Practical implications include the need for new wineries desiring to enter franchise law states to carefully research regulations and distributors before making a commitment, as well as the social issue of less wine choice and higher prices for consumers in Georgia versus Florida.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study in the USA to focus on the impact of wine franchise laws on consumer choice and wine price. It yields useful information that contributes to the body of knowledge for wine and policy research.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Magda Nutsa Kobakhidze

Purpose – The chapter explores the newly launched Teacher Certification Examinations (TCEs) in one of the post-Soviet countries, Georgia, and describes the experiences and…

Abstract

Purpose – The chapter explores the newly launched Teacher Certification Examinations (TCEs) in one of the post-Soviet countries, Georgia, and describes the experiences and perceptions of Georgian teachers going through the process of teacher certification. The qualitative study develops an in-depth understanding of the perceived strength and weaknesses of TCE in Georgia.Methodology – This case study was carried out in the spring of 2012 in 17 Georgian schools. School teachers and school principals from public and private schools were interviewed. A convenience sampling technique was used to recruit all participants. In addition to data obtained from research participants, various policy documents, laws on general education, minister's decrees, and statistical databases are analyzed and incorporated into the study.Findings – The data analyses showed that while the certification policy, in some way, increased teachers’ social status and prestige in the society, it failed to meet teachers’ expectations regarding remuneration policy and professional development opportunities. The TCE, without an adequate compensation policy as well as other types of incentives to increase teacher motivation, creates only a technical threshold for teachers to obtain a teacher certificate to secure jobs, rather than being a catalyst for a genuine professional development opportunity.Value – The study is the first attempt to empirically examine the teacher certification process in Georgia, thus it fills a knowledge gap that exists in the field. The Georgian TCE is the first TCE in south Caucasus; thus, the study of the implementation and outcomes of the Georgian reform provides a unique opportunity for the region and for the rest of the developing world to learn from the successes and failures of the reform process.

Details

Teacher Reforms Around the World: Implementations and Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-654-5

Keywords

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