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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Jonathan D. Pemberton and George H. Stonehouse

Competitive success is governed by an organisation’s ability to develop new knowledge assets that create core competences. While these exist in many forms, organisational…

Abstract

Competitive success is governed by an organisation’s ability to develop new knowledge assets that create core competences. While these exist in many forms, organisational learning is an integral feature of any learning organisation that exploits its knowledge resources to generate superior performance. This paper explores the ideas and links between organisational learning and knowledge management, making reference to a number of sectors and companies, and specifically the airline industry, arguing that the culture, structure and infrastructure of an organisation are essential elements that facilitate and nurture learning. As a consequence, core competences are built and developed within the learning organisation which, in turn, contribute to its competitive success.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Sonal Minocha and George Stonehouse

This paper aims to highlight the nature of strategic learning in Bollywood, India's Hindi Film Industry. Film making is an art that requires continuous learning as a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight the nature of strategic learning in Bollywood, India's Hindi Film Industry. Film making is an art that requires continuous learning as a prerequisite to creativity and innovation. Improved competitive performance goes beyond operational organisational learning into strategic learning. This research investigates the extent to which strategic learning, as opposed to operational learning, is taking place within film making organisations operating in the Bollywood setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted through two descriptive case studies of production houses in Bollywood using semi‐structured observations and interviews with producers and directors in the case study sites. Data are analysed using techniques of interpretive “illuminative evaluation”.

Findings

The research suggests that the current frame of film making at Bollywood is stuck in a learning trap, in that organisational learning tends to be adaptive not generative and leads only to technical innovation. There has been no change in the paradigm of film making from one rooted in the past and the present, in terms of India's history, social and political context, to one looking to the future. For this paradigm shift to take place a future vision is proposed in the form of strategic learning and innovation, allowing Bollywood to go beyond the domestic Indian market and make a contribution to world cinema by breaking away from its current formulaic approach to film making. These findings also have implications for other management learning and practice contexts.

Research limitations/implications

Although this research is limited to Bollywood, it has implications which potentially go beyond it in the form of a new frame as described above, and also for the organisational learning literature which has tended to focus on learning in general, rather than differentiating between operational learning and strategic learning; whereas operational learning can improve production processes, strategic learning depends upon creativity and innovation as the basis of improved competitive performance.

Practical implications

The paper concludes that the research site is trapped within its current frame of learning and, in order to break away from it, it must embrace strategic learning to move beyond the traditional loops of organisational learning. The practical implications of the paper lie in furthering the understanding of the nature of strategic learning in a creative industry, which may, in turn, shed new light on strategic learning within similar contexts.

Originality/value

The originality of the research stems from the focus on strategic learning and a new site for its exploration in the form of the Bollywood setting. Furthermore it extends understanding of the organisational factors affecting the status of strategic learning in organisations.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 44 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

George H. Stonehouse and Jonathan D. Pemberton

Core competences, emanating from an organisation and that provide distinctive benefits to customers, are commonly viewed as the basis of competitive advantage. While these…

Abstract

Core competences, emanating from an organisation and that provide distinctive benefits to customers, are commonly viewed as the basis of competitive advantage. While these exist in many forms, the role of individual and organisational knowledge is increasingly important in the formation of knowledge‐based core competences. This paper explores the ideas of knowledge management, making reference to a number of sectors and companies, and specifically the airline industry, arguing that the culture, structure and infrastructure of an organisation are integral elements that facilitate and nurture learning. As a consequence, competences are built and developed within the “intelligent” organisation, which in turn, contribute to its competitive success.

Details

Participation and Empowerment: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-4449

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Jon Pemberton, Anna Buehring, George Stonehouse, Louise Simpson and Ian Purves

This paper charts the technological developments that have taken place within primary health care during the last 20 years, drawing upon previous research and presenting…

Abstract

This paper charts the technological developments that have taken place within primary health care during the last 20 years, drawing upon previous research and presenting new survey findings on the current state of computerisation. The survey reveals that 96 per cent of UK practices use a clinical computer system, with repeat and acute prescribing, the collation of annual data and audits/searches being the most well used applications. The move towards the so‐called “paperless” practice is strongly related to GPs’ computing expertise, with larger practices more likely to have gone in this direction. Over half of GP practices now have access to the Internet. Improvement of computing skills appears a major determinant of successful integration of technology within a practice. There is a need to develop a social architecture and learning environment that allows GPs to provide good quality health care with clinical computer systems at its heart.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 16 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

Xiaoming Cong, Richard Li‐Hua and George Stonehouse

This paper aims to examine knowledge management (KM) processes and its implementation in the public sector in China and seeks to identify success factors that influence KM…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine knowledge management (KM) processes and its implementation in the public sector in China and seeks to identify success factors that influence KM and attempts to address various key issues in the process in a hope to raise awareness of KM as a potential solution to improve the performance in the public sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study and research experience are presented.

Findings

The study suggests that KM in the public sector still in its infancy and has a long way to go in the KM journey. However, the study has identified a certain number of factors that are essential to the success of the KM initiative and program in the public sector, of which, the appropriateness and effectiveness of knowledge sharing is more important in the public sector than in the private sector. The study examines current situation in terms of KM activities in the public sector in China and fuelled the debate concerning KM in the public sector.

Practical implications

The outcome of the research could have significant implications for KM programs in public sector organizations in China.

Originality/value

This study is a comprehensive examination and analysis of the process of KM and its implementation in the public sector in China, incorporating both the cultural and organizational factors that play a role in the whole process. The paper describes and develops a framework of KM processes and implementation in the public sector as well as recommendations to practitioners about planning and implementing KM programs and initiatives.

Details

Journal of Technology Management in China, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8779

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

George Stonehouse and Jonathan Pemberton

Strategic frameworks and tools of analysis have been the subject of much academic debate over the last 20 years. This paper reviews the main approaches to strategic…

Abstract

Strategic frameworks and tools of analysis have been the subject of much academic debate over the last 20 years. This paper reviews the main approaches to strategic management and, by presenting the results of a survey of 159 small and medium sized enterprises selected from both the service and manufacturing sectors, demonstrates a divide between the theoretical concepts and the practical realities of strategic planning. While there are strong indications of business planning among the organisations surveyed, there is less evidence of strategic thinking except among larger businesses. Even in this latter group there are only a few instances where the recognised tools of strategic management appear to play a role in planning, the exception being internal financial analysis, which is widely undertaken.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 40 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

The Hindi film industry is known affectionately throughout the world as “Bollywood”. All the glitter and glamour of Hollywood can be found in Mumbai (formerly Bombay which provided the “B” in “Bollywood”) along with prolific production surpassing anything Hollywood can hope to attain. While at one time the market for Bollywood films was mainly the South Asian sub‐continent, the last two decades have witnessed an explosive growth in audiences, linked to a rapid increase in sales to overseas markets. There are several factors which may account for this success including economic migration from South Asia to Europe and North America, an increasing interest in Indian culture on the part of Western audiences fueled in part by the success of Anglo‐Indian films such as “Bend it Like Beckham” or “East is East” and the proliferation of satellite television. However, there is what could be perceived as a fly in the ointment of Bollywood's success. The genre of films produced by the major Mumbai studios is very limited, and as such can't hope to rival the more universal appeal of Hollywood films. While the Mumbai film industry demonstrates some aspects of growth and development, these tend to be in the realm of technical expertise. Creativity and experimentation in story line, subject matter or plot development are noticeable by their absence.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Abstract

Details

Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-785-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1941

Until after the war of 1914–18 the development of the knowledge of food chemistry lagged behind in this country, but furthermore the utilisation by the medical profession…

Abstract

Until after the war of 1914–18 the development of the knowledge of food chemistry lagged behind in this country, but furthermore the utilisation by the medical profession of the knowledge available also lagged behind. This, whilst being deplored, is understandable, for the scope of the training of the members of the medical profession is so extensive that specialised knowledge, until it becomes general knowledge, cannot be incorporated in the scope of their training. One unfortunate aspect of the situation is that members of the medical profession, rightly regarded by the public as their advisers on food matters, have tended, often inadvertently, to mislead on such questions. To illustrate this point I will quote two flagrant instances. In one of the large democracies a trade feud began between the manufacturers of two kinds of baking powders. One of the powders contained aluminium in the form of alum, the other did not. Both financial groups were powerful and employed many scientific advisers, either directly or indirectly. All evidence for and against aluminium was collected and distributed to anyone who showed the slightest interest in the matter. An English physician became impressed by the argument against the use of aluminium for cooking vessels and circulated his opinion widely, giving evidence of many patients he had cured by cutting out the use of aluminium cooking utensils. This was characterised by a writer to the British Medical Journal as an interesting example of “ faith healing.” There is no scientific evidence that the trace of aluminium that may be dissolved from an aluminium saucepan is in any way harmful. Naturally one cannot argue for the few people who have certain idiosyncrasies, and perhaps it has been the fortune of that physician to meet a large proportion of these among his patients. The whole question was discussed in detail some years ago but, although invited, the physician did not attend. A point, not without significance, is that the analytical figures on which the condemnation of aluminium cooking vessels was based, were proved to be wrong. Had they been correct, a stewpan would only last twenty stews before it was all dissolved away! The second example is that of “digestive” teas. Advocates of so‐called digestive teas base their criticism of ordinary teas on the fact that they contain “tannin” which they aver has some extraordinary effect on the stomach lining and on the process of digestion. Naturally the public believe this, and, presumably remembering that the tanning of hides yields a product, leather, they assume that the stomach by analogy becomes tanned; some members of the medical profession also accept the claim of the vendors of the so‐called digestive teas. It is, of course, well known that there is a large group of substances, in many cases with ill‐defined structure, classed as “tannin,” and among these is the tannin from tea which, however, could not be used for the production of leather from hides. Dr. Roche Lynch was very categorical with regard to the absence of clinical evidence at a meeting some little time ago. He stated that he did not believe that post mortem examination had ever revealed any changes of the stomach which could be associated with heavy consumption of tea. The vast majority of these digestive teas have been examined and the point to be specially noted is that the tannin content of these “special” teas is well up to the average of that for ordinary blends of tea, and in certain cases above the average. The Public Analyst for Birmingham has made some scathing comments on “Tanninless” teas. As he said, the inference from the advertisement matter was that the tea would be “more digestible,” would “promote digestion,” or in one case would “cure indigestion.” Other misleading statements are that “Young tips” have been used, but these, in fact, are higher in tannin content than the normal picking of leaves; and that “stalk” has been eliminated, whereas stalk is lower in tannin content than the leaves themselves. It is, of course, well known that sufferers from digestive disorders are very prone to the effect of “suggestion” and one can assume that the clever advertisements have been the cause of the improvement in the patient's condition. The nations most prone to be influenced by considerations of the effect of food eaten on the functions of the body are the Americans and Germans, the former possibly because methods of advertisement have been developed to a higher pitch of efficiency than anywhere else, and the latter because as Hitler has said of the Germans, they are as a nation most gullible. I have mentioned the collection of data in the case of aluminium, and I will deal later with the development of food chemistry as reflected by the amount of published work. There is an ever increasing flow of papers dealing with this aspect of science. During the war of 1914–1918, there was a remarkable falling off of published work, and doubtless we shall experience a similar diminution during the present war, for food chemists, in common with other chemists, are deflected from their ordinary course, urgent practical problems taking precedence over the more fundamental investigations, the results of which are normally published. Our thoughts naturally turn to the general question of the provision of food in war time in this country. We have had that admirable little book “Feeding the People in War Time,” by Orr and Lubbock, just published; we have had lectures, broadcast talks and discussions, but, whilst practical in some senses, the general scope of these discussions has dealt with the subject from a somewhat academic standpoint—certainly not from the angle of the people who have to produce the food. During a period of war the total nutritional value of any food becomes of paramount importance. It is important to remember, however, that the findings of the dietitian have to be translated into factory practice, and until this has been done academic conclusions do not become effective. One cannot commend too highly the idea that there should be certain foods, basic rations, available in large quantities. Orr and Lubbock suggest that these should be: milk, potatoes, oatmeal, vegetables, bread, sugar and either butter or vitaminised margarine. As far as our knowledge goes at present, such a list of basic foods taken in requisite quantities would not only give sufficient calories but those other constituents of food essential to good health. That these should be available to the housewife is apparent, but unless they are relieved by a proportion of the less essential foods, the diet would become deadly dull; many of us remember our experiences in the army in the last war, how spirits flagged when the bare necessities alone were available, and how, moreover, the addition of those little “extras” would raise the morale of the soldier.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

George N. Theriou and Prodromos D. Chatzoglou

This paper aims to empirically examine the linkages between best human resource (HRM) practices, knowledge management, organisational learning, organisational capabilities…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to empirically examine the linkages between best human resource (HRM) practices, knowledge management, organisational learning, organisational capabilities and organisational performance. The proposed framework and findings intend to add to the understanding of the specific processes that mediate between best HRM practices and organisational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

To carry out this research a survey research strategy was followed. The sample frame for this study consisted of Greek firms that belong to the tertiary (services and commerce) sector, employing at least 50 employees. The final research sample consisted of 242 questionnaires. Descriptive statistics as well as structural equation modelling (SEM) techniques were used to analyse the data.

Findings

This paper proposes an answer to “how” best HRM practices can influence performance. Results indicate that service and commercial firms pursuing best HRM practices achieve better performance through the interaction of these practices with knowledge management and organisational learning capability and the creation of organisational capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

Possible limitations of the study include the relatively small sample size, the use of subjective performance indicators and the measurement of organisational capabilities.

Practical implications

The paper can help human resource practitioners and/or managers to understand better the importance of organisational learning and knowledge management processes and the way best HRM practices, through the integration of these two processes, lead to superior and sustainable performance.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to shed some light on the processes through which human resource management practices influence performance. Moreover, the value of the human factor in knowledge management and organisational learning initiatives, as well as on organisational capabilities, is explored. While this has already been underlined in the past, there is still no complete model simultaneously describing and testing all those relationships.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 21 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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