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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Aikaterini Vassilikopoulou, Apostolos Lepetsos and George Siomkos

This paper aims to examine consumer reactions during product-harm crises by measuring the impact of perceived risk, blame and trust on consumer purchase intentions…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine consumer reactions during product-harm crises by measuring the impact of perceived risk, blame and trust on consumer purchase intentions. Moreover, the role of perceived crisis severity is examined as affecting the three main endogenous variables of the conceptual framework.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses the real-scenario approach for empirically testing the proposed conceptual framework. Participants were called to assess the story of a defective product (i.e. a soother that was recently recalled).

Findings

Results of the equation modeling demonstrate that perceived severity significantly influence trust and blame while it does not affect perceived risk. In addition, trust, blame and perceived risk notably affect purchase intentions.

Practical implications

Based on the study’s results, companies could implement appropriate strategies for reducing the negative consequences of a product-harm crisis.

Originality/value

The paper presents four key originality traits: Crisis management from the consumer perspective has received little attention. The relationship between trust, perceived risk and purchase intentions has not been explored in the crisis management field. Attribution of blame is a new variable added to the perceived risk-trust-purchase intention model. Perceived severity is examined as a moderator affecting the main endogenous variables of the conceptual framework.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Amalia Triantafillidou and George Siomkos

The aim of the present study is twofold. First, it measures Facebook users’ experience in a holistic way by taking into account the various dimensions of Facebook…

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2661

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the present study is twofold. First, it measures Facebook users’ experience in a holistic way by taking into account the various dimensions of Facebook experience (i.e. entertainment, flow, escapism, challenge, learning, socializing and communitas); second, it tests the effects of these dimensions in relation to consumers’ brand engagement on Facebook.

Design/methodology/approach

Two online surveys were conducted using self-administered questionnaires. Respondents were recruited through the snowball sampling technique.

Findings

The findings suggest that the different experiential elements of Facebook usage have varying effects on the two brand engagement factors (consuming and contributing) on Facebook. Specifically, the passive element (consuming) is positively influenced by the dimensions of flow and communitas (i.e. feelings of belongingness), while escapism is found to be a negative predictor. The active element of engagement (contributing) is positively affected by dimensions such as entertainment, flow, socializing and communitas.

Practical implications

Brand managers should design Facebook pages for their brands that entertain and immerse consumers, while enabling them to socialize and bond with others to increase levels of consumers’ engagement with brands on Facebook. However, brand managers should be cautious regarding the fantasy experience (escapism) offered by their Facebook pages, as this can distract consumers from the content of the brand page.

Originality/value

To date, most studies on Facebook usage have been conducted under the uses and gratifications framework, while the various elements that comprise Facebook users’ experience have not received sufficient attention in previous conceptualizations of Facebook experience. In addition, the present study enhances the research by examining consumers’ brand engagement on Facebook as a potential consequence of the various Facebook experience dimensions.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2017

Amalia Triantafillidou, George Siomkos and Eirini Papafilippaki

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of store characteristics (i.e. product availability, product quality, store layout, employee politeness, décor…

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5709

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of store characteristics (i.e. product availability, product quality, store layout, employee politeness, décor, music, lighting, and aroma) on the various dimensions of in-store leisure shopping experience (i.e. hedonic, flow, escapism, challenge, learning, socialising, and communitas).

Design/methodology/approach

In order to achieve the study’s objectives, a quantitative on-site survey was conducted. Respondents were interviewed upon exiting fashion retail stores.

Findings

Findings indicate that not all store characteristics impact the various dimensions of experience in the same way. Product quality and in-store music were found to be the most important in-store characteristics that affected the majority of experience dimensions. Other important store attributes that emerged were store layout and ambient scent. Conversely, product range actually had a negative impact on in-store experience.

Practical implications

By orchestrating the most influential in-store characteristics, fashion retailers could be delivering unique in-store experiences to their customers. This research shows that they would benefit from designing experiential strategies that focus on merchandise quality, price, and availability while simultaneously carefully managing ambient (music and scent) alongside design factors (store layout and décor). Careful consideration should be paid to merchandise variety in order to avoid potentially negative effects on customers’ shopping experience.

Originality/value

Until now most studies that document the relationship between store elements and shopping experiences have examined the effects of store characteristics on a limited number of experience dimensions. This study adds to the body of research into in-store leisure shopping experience in two ways: by shedding light on its multi-dimensional nature, and by analysing the effect of the different store elements on the various components of the in-store experience.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2010

George Siomkos, Amalia Triantafillidou, Aikaterini Vassilikopoulou and Ioannis Tsiamis

Product‐harm crises have become an almost familiar phenomenon in today's business environment as technology becomes more vulnerable. Even if a product‐harm crisis is…

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3576

Abstract

Purpose

Product‐harm crises have become an almost familiar phenomenon in today's business environment as technology becomes more vulnerable. Even if a product‐harm crisis is associated with the company that manufactured the defective product, the entire industry may be affected. Not only consumers of the affected company, but also consumers of competitors are affected by the crisis. The paper seeks to deal mainly with the situation of competitors and examines the potential opportunities and threats that may arise when another company in the same industry faces a product‐harm crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

For the purposes of this paper, an experiment was conducted that relied on four important influential factors of crisis management (i.e. corporate reputation, crisis scope, external effects, and organisational responses). The crisis was described through a hypothetical scenario. Consumer attitudes towards competitive products were used to determine impending prospects and threats.

Findings

The paper's results demonstrate that consumers are very receptive in buying competitor brands, especially when the extent of the crisis was medium or high and the company involved in the crisis had shown low levels of social responsibility.

Originality/value

Previous research studies on crisis management mainly focus on the affected company and how it confronted the crisis. The paper approaches crisis management from the competitor's perspective. Because a crisis may influence the entire sector, adequate preparation and effective crisis management skills are essential assets for competitors.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Aikaterini Vassilikopoulou, George Siomkos, Kalliopi Chatzipanagiotou and Amalia Triantafillidou

This paper aims to investigate the consumer responses associated with crises in the hotel industry. More precisely, the current research explores the factors that affect…

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4264

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the consumer responses associated with crises in the hotel industry. More precisely, the current research explores the factors that affect consumer attitudes (i.e. impressions, perceived social responsibility, and future purchases) during a hotel crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment was conducted relying on four factors: the hotel's reputation, the extent of the crisis, external effects from regulatory agencies, and press and organisational response. Respondents were randomly assigned to 36 treatment groups (three levels of crisis extent×two levels of hotel corporate reputation×two levels of external effects×three levels of hotel response). Scenarios were developed, each describing one of the 36 treatments.

Findings

The results revealed that reputation, external effects and organisational response significantly influenced consumers. Specifically, consumers were more likely to have a positive impression of a hotel in crisis, to perceive the hotel as being more socially responsible, and to revisit the hotel when it was highly reputed, accepted responsibility, and was viewed favourably by the media. The extent of the crisis was found to be an insignificant factor.

Practical implications

Hotel managers could incorporate the results of this study into their crisis management plans. As consumer attitudes are explored, the hotel might begin to achieve more effective crisis management strategies.

Originality/value

There is a lack of research investigating hotel crisis management from the customer's perspective. By adopting effective crisis management practices, hotel managers could reduce the negative outcomes of crises such as fires.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

George J. Siomkos

Deals with the management of industrial crises, low‐probability, high‐impact events which typically affect companies involved in them, negatively. Specifically examines…

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2565

Abstract

Deals with the management of industrial crises, low‐probability, high‐impact events which typically affect companies involved in them, negatively. Specifically examines the role of three important factors, i.e. company’s reputation, the organizational response that it selects to adopt in order to deal with the crisis, and external effects that are faced during a product safety crisis. Emphasis is placed on determining the effects of an industrial crisis (caused by a harmful product) on the consumers’ attributions of company responsibility. It is shown that high reputation companies have generally an easier time dealing with industrial crises. In addition, companies faced with positive external effects and having voluntarily recalled the defects, are held the least responsible for the harm by consumers. Managerial implications are presented for high and low reputation companies involved in product safety crises, with emphasis placed on crisis prevention rather than mere reaction to it.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

Paul Shrivastava and George Siomkos

Corporate crises are becoming more frequent and devastating for corporations. The Bhopal disaster cost Union Carbide Corporation over half a billion dollars and forced it…

Abstract

Corporate crises are becoming more frequent and devastating for corporations. The Bhopal disaster cost Union Carbide Corporation over half a billion dollars and forced it into a restructuring that reduced its size by one half.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Gary Kurzbard and George J. Siomkos

Companies as diverse as AT&T, Exxon, and Beech‐Nut have discovered that when a crisis occurs, rarely are a corporation's contingency plans designed well enough to…

Abstract

Companies as diverse as AT&T, Exxon, and Beech‐Nut have discovered that when a crisis occurs, rarely are a corporation's contingency plans designed well enough to effectively deal with the situation. In this case study of the Perrier crisis, a better job by the company's crisis management team could have saved both the company's and the product's reputation.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Amalia Triantafillidou and George Siomkos

The aim of the present study is to investigate the impact of the different aspects of consumption experience on various post-consumption variables (i.e. satisfaction…

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6107

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the present study is to investigate the impact of the different aspects of consumption experience on various post-consumption variables (i.e. satisfaction, nostalgia intensity, word-of-mouth (WOM) communication and behavioural intentions).

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative study using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted. The sample comprised of 645 respondents and the snowball sampling technique was used. Consumption experience was measured using a seven-dimensional scale (dimensions: hedonic, flow, escapism, socialisation, personal challenge, learning and communitas).

Findings

Not all experience dimensions affect consumers equally in the post-consumption stage. Hedonism was an important experiential dimension affecting positively most of the post-consumption variables. Other boosters of consumers’ nostalgia, WOM communication and behavioural intentions were the feelings of escapism, knowledge and communitas. On the contrary, flow and personal challenge were negative predictors of consumers’ evaluations.

Practical implications

Marketers should co-create the experience with consumers by carefully managing their experiential offering. Companies should focus on designing pleasurable, social, educational and fantasy experiences while minimizing the feelings of immersion and risk that arise from intense activities.

Originality/value

A holistic conceptual model on the consequences of the different consumption experience dimensions is tested. Until now, most of the relevant studies on experiences have treated experience as a higher order construct without taking into consideration the different effects of the various experience dimensions. Hence, the present study contributes to research by identifying the most pertinent experience dimensions on post-consumption evaluations, behaviour and intentions of consumers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 31 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Emmanouela E. Manganari, George J. Siomkos and Adam P. Vrechopoulos

The purpose of this study is to provide a conceptual framework for studying the effects of online store atmosphere on consumer behaviour and a compilation of empirical…

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11417

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide a conceptual framework for studying the effects of online store atmosphere on consumer behaviour and a compilation of empirical studies from the time when research on web atmospherics emerged in the literature in 1999 until today.

Design/methodology/approach

A desk research approach is followed in order to concentrate empirical research on the effects of online store atmosphere on consumer behaviour from top academic journals and conference proceedings through an interdisciplinary research approach (i.e. marketing and information systems literature).

Findings

Extant research is concentrated and presented in a structured way. Online store atmosphere influences various aspects of consumer behaviour online. However, there are many open research issues on the effects of online store atmosphere on consumer behaviour.

Originality/value

The present study develops a parsimonious conceptual framework for studying the effects of online store atmosphere, summarises the knowledge on online store atmosphere in a structured and systematic manner, and identifies gaps and opportunities for advancing established knowledge. No single comprehensive collection of empirical research progress on online store atmosphere exists. The paper constitutes a valuable reference of compact information and future research suggestions for both academics and practitioners.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 43 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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