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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Anthimia M. Batrinou, Vassilis Spiliotis and George Sakellaris

The purpose of this paper is to examine how label information may affect the acceptability by young consumers of a food produced by genetic engineering methods.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how label information may affect the acceptability by young consumers of a food produced by genetic engineering methods.

Design/methodology/approach

A popular snack derived from maize (corn chip) was presented with five different labels (“organic corn”, “conventional corn”, “product that contains genetically modified (GM) corn”, “product that contains GM corn approved by EU”, “non‐classified corn”) to 229 university students in Greece in order to taste it.

Findings

The results obtained showed that the GM label evoked a deeply rooted negative attitude as more than half of participants (63 per cent) refused to taste even a single piece of the product. The product labelled “GM but approved by EU” was viewed as more credible but still 28 per cent refused to sample. The conclusion was that although the feeling of trust increased considerably when the label message was supported by a certifying authority, a large proportion (almost one third) of participants refused to taste a product that had been approved by the EU for nearly a decade.

Practical implications

This result demonstrated in an emphatic way a degree of phobia concerning GM food and the importance of carefully worded labelling.

Originality/value

The attitude of consumers after direct experience with a GM food product had never been reported for Greece and these findings may serve as an exploratory tool for further investigations on GM food related attitudes.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2012

George Giannakopoulos, Haris Assimopoulos, Dimitra Petanidou, Chara Tzavara, Gerasimos Kolaitis and John Tsiantis

High school students are a common target group in initiatives addressing discriminatory attitudes towards people with mental illness. However, these initiatives are rarely…

Abstract

High school students are a common target group in initiatives addressing discriminatory attitudes towards people with mental illness. However, these initiatives are rarely evaluated and documented. The aim of our paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of a school-based educational intervention for improving adolescents' attitudes and reducing the desire for social distance from people with mental illness living in their community. A total of 161 students aged 16-18 years old were questioned at baseline assessment and 86 of them received a three-workshop educational intervention while 75 students comprised the control group. A follow-up assessment 1 month post intervention evaluated its impact. Attitudes and the social distance were assessed through the Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill scale and a 10-statement questionnaire based on the Self-report Inventory of Fear and Behavioural Intentions, respectively. Data from 140 subjects were analyzed. All attitude dimensions and half of the measured social distance statements were significantly improved in the intervention group at follow up assessment compared to controls. However, the statements measuring more intimate types of social relationships did not change significantly post intervention. In conclusion, short educational interventions can be effective to some extent in reducing discriminatory attitudes towards people with mental illness. However, effective interventions to address deeply held negative stereotypes will require further research.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2019

Katerina Giazitzi, George Palisidis, George Boskou and Vassiliki Costarelli

This study aims to assemble and nutritionally analyze three traditional Greek hotel breakfast meals (Chalkidiki, Cyclades and Crete) and compare them with the American…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assemble and nutritionally analyze three traditional Greek hotel breakfast meals (Chalkidiki, Cyclades and Crete) and compare them with the American, English and continental breakfast.

Design/methodology/approach

The traditional local breakfast foods and beverages for the breakfast compositions were selectively chosen predominantly from the website of the “Greek breakfast” initiative by Greek Chamber of Hotels and from other sources, following a thorough review of the literature. The breakfast meals were designed to be consumed by two people. The nutritional analysis of the meals was performed with the use of specially designed spreadsheets, the US Department of Agriculture Research Service and Greek food composition database.

Findings

The nutritional analysis of the English (45.9 g), American (41.6 g) and Cretan (38.8 g) breakfast meals revealed that these breakfast meals had the highest amount of total fat (per estimated portion) with the Cretan breakfast containing the largest amount of monounsaturated fatty acids (2.9 g/100 kcal). Moreover, the Cretan breakfast had also the lowest levels of sugars (2 g/100 kcal). The highest quantity of simple sugars was contained in the continental breakfast (7.2 g/100 kcal). The English breakfast had the highest sodium content (186.3 mg/100 kcal). Finally, the Cyclades breakfast had very high levels of potassium (184.4 mg/100 kcal) and Chalkidiki’s breakfast had the highest amount of calcium (65.2 mg/100 kcal). The three traditional Greek breakfasts and the three conventional breakfasts were grouped in two categories and compared nutritionally. The results show that the content of monounsaturated fats is significantly higher in Greek breakfast meals (p-value < 0.05) compared to the conventional ones.

Originality/value

This nutritional comparison could facilitate the promotion of traditional Greek breakfast meals in tourist destinations.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 February 2022

Li-San Hung and Mucahid Mustafa Bayrak

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between gender ideologies and the motivation to mitigate climate change among a sample (N = 663) representative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between gender ideologies and the motivation to mitigate climate change among a sample (N = 663) representative of the Taiwanese population, taking into account the different aspects of gender ideology measures and the multidimensionality of gender ideologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A landline-based telephone survey in Taiwan was used to collect research data. Pearson correlations were used to determine the associations between gender ideologies and motivation to mitigate climate change, and multiple regression analysis was performed to determine whether gender ideology measures were predictors for motivation to mitigate climate change.

Findings

The results suggested that the relationships between gender ideologies and mitigation motivation are complex, and that both traditional and egalitarian views of gender ideologies, measured using different scales, are positively associated with motivation. The dynamics of relationships among subgroups divided by gender and marital status need to be considered, as the relationships between gender ideologies and motivation are salient for unmarried individuals as well as married females.

Research limitations/implications

The findings support the premise that gender ideologies play an essential and complex role in individual climate change mitigation behaviors.

Originality/value

This is the first study that systematically examined the relationships between gender ideologies and motivation to mitigate climate change.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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