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Book part
Publication date: 8 September 2017

Kenneth J. Smith, David J. Emerson and George S. Everly

This paper examines the influence of stress arousal and burnout as mediators of the negative relations between role stressors and job outcomes (satisfaction, performance…

Abstract

This paper examines the influence of stress arousal and burnout as mediators of the negative relations between role stressors and job outcomes (satisfaction, performance, and turnover intentions) among a sample of AICPA members working in public accounting. It extends prior research which examined these linkages (Chong & Monroe, 2015; Fogarty, Singh, Rhoads, & Moore, 2000; Smith, Davy, & Everly, 2007) by evaluating a model that simultaneously incorporates stress arousal and the three fundamental dimensions of burnout, i.e., emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment. This paper also utilizes a recently validated stress arousal measure designed to capture the worry and rumination aspects of arousal posited to be responsible for a number of negative personal outcomes.

The results indicate that role stressors, mediated by stress arousal and the individual burnout dimensions, have a negative influence on job outcomes. In line with predictions regarding the temporal ordering of stress arousal and burnout in the model, each of the job stressors had a significant positive influence on accountants’ stress arousal, and the influence of the individual role stressors on each burnout dimension was either partially or fully mediated via their relations with stress arousal. In turn, the influence of stress arousal on each of the job outcomes was either partially or fully mediated through its relations with emotional exhaustion.

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Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-527-6

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2012

Kenneth J. Smith, George S. Everly and G. Timothy Haight

The Stress Arousal Scale (SAS; Everly, Sherman, & Smith, 1989) is a 20-item psychometric instrument designed to measure cognitive–affective precipitators of the…

Abstract

The Stress Arousal Scale (SAS; Everly, Sherman, & Smith, 1989) is a 20-item psychometric instrument designed to measure cognitive–affective precipitators of the physiological stress response. The SAS has been utilized in a number of studies that have examined various relations between stress arousal and its antecedents and consequences in the accounting work environment. This study introduces a new version of this scale, the SAS4, developed based on the Perseverative Cognition Hypothesis (Brosschot, Gerin, & Thayer, 2006). It is hypothesized that this new scale has internal consistency, test–retest reliability, and both convergent and divergent validity as well as significant correlation with the balance of the items on the original scale. These predictions are tested with a sample of American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) members employed in public accounting, and four independent samples of undergraduate business students. The results indicate that the SAS4 is a valid and reliable psychometric measure with potential benefits in terms of its congruence with recent theoretical and empirical advances in the etiology of stress, as well as its administrative efficiency for those seeking to further examine the stress dynamic among accountants in the workplace.

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Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-758-1

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Article
Publication date: 12 May 2020

Kenneth J. Smith, David J. Emerson, Charles R. Boster and George S. Everly, Jr

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential counteracting influence of individual resilience levels on the tendency of role stressors, stress arousal and burnout…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the potential counteracting influence of individual resilience levels on the tendency of role stressors, stress arousal and burnout to reduce job satisfaction and increase turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveys 332 auditors from the offices of nine public accounting firms. The structural equations modeling procedures examine an expanded role stress model to assess the nature and extent of the role that resilience plays in reducing stress, burnout, job dissatisfaction and turnover intentions.

Findings

Resilience has a significant direct negative association with stress arousal and burnout, a significant indirect positive association with job satisfaction and a significant indirect negative association with turnover intentions.

Research limitations/implications

As a cross-sectional study that incorporates self-report instruments, no definitive statements can be made about causality. However, the results extend the extant knowledge related of the role of resilience as a coping mechanism within the role stress paradigm in auditor work settings.

Practical implications

This study’s findings suggest the potential value of resilience training programs at public accounting firms to reduce staff burnout. In turn, reduced burnout has an increased likelihood ceteris paribus of increasing job satisfaction and reducing auditor turnover intentions.

Originality/value

This study’s findings suggest that resilience training for public accounting staff to reduce burnout may provide the organizational and personal benefits associated with enhancing job satisfaction and decreasing turnover intentions.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2016

Daryl M. Guffey

This paper ranks university faculties, accounting doctoral programs, individual behavioral accounting researchers, and the most influential articles based on Google…

Abstract

This paper ranks university faculties, accounting doctoral programs, individual behavioral accounting researchers, and the most influential articles based on Google Scholar citations to publications in Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research (AABR). All articles published in AABR in its first 15 volumes are included and four citation metrics are used. The paper identifies the articles, authors, faculties, and doctoral programs that made the greatest contribution to the development of AABR. Such an analysis provides a useful basis for understanding the direction the journal has taken and how it has contributed to the literature (Meyer & Rigsby, 2001). The h-index and m-index for AABR indicates it compares favorably among its peers. Potential doctoral students with an interest in behavioral accounting research, “new” accounting faculty with an interest in behavioral accounting research, current behavioral accounting research faculty, department chairs, deans, and other administrators will find these results informative.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-977-0

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Book part
Publication date: 9 May 2012

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-758-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 September 2017

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-527-6

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Book part
Publication date: 6 February 2019

George R. Goethals and Scott T. Allison

Abstract

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The Romance of Heroism and Heroic Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-655-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1986

Stephen W. Rogers

Do these reference requests sound familiar? “I need to know what has happened on this day in history. Can you help me?” Or, “I'm doing a paper on Thornton Wilder. He was…

Abstract

Do these reference requests sound familiar? “I need to know what has happened on this day in history. Can you help me?” Or, “I'm doing a paper on Thornton Wilder. He was born on 17 April. Can you tell me who else was born on that day?” Or, “Are any national or regional anniversaries coming up next Friday?” These questions call for a special type of reference work—a book of days. A book of days (or day book) lists important events that have occurred on each day of the year throughout history, and is arranged by month and day. These works often include not only historical, cultural, and literary events, but also the dates of the births and deaths of notable people, commemorative days of saints, and special anniversaries. A book of days, for example, can reveal that historians Will and Ariel Durant were married in New York City Hall on Halloween in 1913, or that Hart Crane and Ernest Hemingway were born on the same day in 1899 (21 July). This article will review some of the more useful books of days that are often found in reference collections—works that are uniquely suited to answer questions about each day of the year.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Radha R. Sharma and Sir Cary Cooper

Abstract

Details

Executive Burnout
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-285-9

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Azrah Anparasan and Miguel Lejeune

The purpose of this paper is to propose a novel evidence-based Haddon matrix that identifies intervention options for organizations and governments responding to an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a novel evidence-based Haddon matrix that identifies intervention options for organizations and governments responding to an epidemic in a developing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review of articles published within a year of the cholera outbreak in Haiti. Two separate types of literature sources are used – academic and non-academic – to apprehend the value and role of interventions implemented and/or identified.

Findings

The Haddon matrix helps break down the challenges involved in the containment of an epidemic into smaller, manageable components. This research shows that the matrix enables visualization of past evidence, help dissect various informational sources, and increase collaboration across humanitarian organizations. It will also serve as a building block for academics to identify new research directions to respond to epidemic outbreaks.

Research limitations/implications

The analysis focuses on the cholera epidemic in Haiti. Future work will be directed to generalize the identified recommendations and insights to a broader context.

Originality/value

This paper presents an evidence-based Haddon matrix that infers recommendations and insights based on past evidence for each phase (pre-event, response, and post-event) and factor (agent, host, physical environment, and socio-cultural environment) of an epidemic and for various stakeholders (humanitarian organizations, governments, and academics). The matrix provides a structured framework to identify interventions and best practices to address challenges during an epidemic outbreak.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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