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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

George Pettinico and George R. Milne

This paper aims to establish if quantified self-data positively impact motivation in a goal pursuit across a broad cross-section of consumers and in multiple contexts; and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to establish if quantified self-data positively impact motivation in a goal pursuit across a broad cross-section of consumers and in multiple contexts; and to understand the underlying causal mechanism and identify boundary conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory qualitative research helped direct the hypotheses development. Two quantitative experiments were then conducted via MTURK, involving 331 respondents, to test the hypotheses in two different personal goal areas (fitness and carbon footprint reduction).

Findings

Self-quantification has a significant and positive impact on anticipated motivation in both contexts studied. The mediated model provides insight into the psychological process underlying self-quantification’s motivational impact, which involves strengthening user perceptions regarding feedback meaningfulness, self-empowerment and goal focus. Age (>50) was found to be a boundary condition; however, distance to goal was not.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on initial (anticipated) motivation, which is the vital first step in behavior change. However, more work is needed to understand quantification’s long-term impact over the course of a behavior change process.

Practical implications

This research encourages firms to incorporate self-quantification features into products/services aimed at behavior change and helps firms better understand consumer-perceived benefits. It alerts firms regarding the extra effort needed to convince older consumers of these benefits.

Originality/value

This is the first study to confirm the “quantification effect” on motivation in multiple life areas and provide a causal model to explain how it works. It is also the first to highlight age as a boundary condition.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Kaeun Kim, George R. Milne and Shalini Bahl

Young consumers are particularly vulnerable to the addictive nature of smart phone technology. This paper aims to investigate the smart phone addiction cycle and health…

Abstract

Purpose

Young consumers are particularly vulnerable to the addictive nature of smart phone technology. This paper aims to investigate the smart phone addiction cycle and health outcomes of young and old consumers from the lens of consumers’ mindfulness traits.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative and quantitative studies reveal that the lack of mindfulness, measured as a mindless trait, is strongly associated with smart phone addictions and health and quality of life outcomes.

Findings

Differences in mindlessness and smart phone-generated health outcomes are found between younger and older consumers. The negative impact of mindlessness on quality of life was greater for younger adults than older adults.

Research limitations/implications

This research establishes baseline effects between the mindless trait and smart phone addiction levels.

Practical implications

Paper suggests the marketing of mindfulness programs and the use of marketplace apps to combat addiction issues.

Social implications

Smart phone addiction is a growing problem, and this paper contributes to the understanding of the problem and offers societal solutions for its resolution.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical paper to investigate the connection between a mindless trait and smart phone tendencies and resulting health outcomes.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Shabnam Azimi, George R. Milne and Elizabeth G. Miller

This paper aims to examine the factors leading to and resulting from procrastination under high price uncertainty and provide recommendations for how managers can reduce…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the factors leading to and resulting from procrastination under high price uncertainty and provide recommendations for how managers can reduce consumer procrastination, thus decreasing consumer regret, anger and retaliatory behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypothesized relationships were tested through two scenario-based experiments using student samples. Data was analyzed using general linear model, path analysis and Wald chi-square test.

Findings

Long time limits, price uncertainty and price consciousness, all increase the likelihood of procrastination. Prestige seeking reduces procrastination, but only when time limits are short. When one delays a purchase and later the price of the item gets increased or one makes a purchase and later the price gets further reduced, procrastination and purchase decision both equally can lead to anger, which then increases the probability of exit, voice or word of mouth (WOM); however, procrastination has a much stronger impact than deciding to purchase on self-responsibility and regret, which in turn increases negative WOM.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides a greater understanding of antecedents and consequences of procrastination as well as the drivers of retaliatory behavior. Further, the findings highlight differential consequences of consumer regret and anger on consumption behaviors.

Practical implications

This paper provides practical suggestions for reducing consumers’ procrastination through leveraging the effects of purchase time limit and price uncertainty in general, and more specifically, for prestige-seeker and price conscious consumers. The findings provide evidence for a silent path from procrastination to retaliation and highlight the importance of possible remedies or interventions by the companies to mitigate consumer emotions resulting from procrastination.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this research is the first to apply temporal motivation theory in the context of consumer behavior under price uncertainty, and examine consequences of consumer procrastination in terms of thoughts, feelings and retaliatory behavior.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Jason Aaron Gabisch and George R. Milne

The question over who “owns” and controls consumer data on the internet is emerging as an important issue as individuals increasingly share more of their personal…

Abstract

Purpose

The question over who “owns” and controls consumer data on the internet is emerging as an important issue as individuals increasingly share more of their personal information with marketers in return for services and benefits. This paper aims to examine how compensating consumers for their personal information affects their expectations for data ownership and privacy control.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct two online scenario-based experiments with a sample of adult consumers. The results were analyzed using multivariate and univariate analysis of variance.

Findings

The findings show that receiving compensation, especially when it is a monetary reward, reduces consumer expectations for privacy protection. These effects depend on whether the information provided to marketers is perceived to be sensitive in nature.

Originality/value

While a number of privacy studies have investigated the effects of compensation on encouraging self-disclosure on the internet, there is a lack of research that examines the effect of compensation on privacy expectations. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first paper to test empirically the construct of information ownership in the context of privacy exchanges.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Jason A. Gabisch and George R. Milne

Rewards and safety cues are frequently used by online marketers to enhance privacy attitudes and to encourage self‐disclosure of personal information. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Rewards and safety cues are frequently used by online marketers to enhance privacy attitudes and to encourage self‐disclosure of personal information. The purpose of this paper is to study the relative effectiveness of these influence strategies and test the boundary condition of regulatory focus.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct an online scenario‐based experiment with a sample of adult consumers. The results were analyzed using multivariate and univariate analysis of variance.

Findings

The findings show that the use of rewards and safety cues has varying effects on privacy attitudes and self‐disclosure, and that these effects depend on consumers' regulatory focus.

Originality/value

The relative effectiveness of rewards and safety cues for enhancing privacy attitudes and encouraging self‐disclosure is not clear from prior research, and boundary conditions have not been established. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to examine regulatory focus as a moderating variable in the relationship between online influence strategies and privacy outcomes.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Shwu‐Ing Wu

Uses benefit needs to segment the online marketing market. Employs focus groups and a random sampling survey to search for consumer benefit needs and then segments the…

Abstract

Uses benefit needs to segment the online marketing market. Employs focus groups and a random sampling survey to search for consumer benefit needs and then segments the market by these benefits sought by customers. Shows that the various segments display significant differences in the benefits sought, lifestyles and demographics etc. Suggests that this work can assist marketing managers to focus on one or more segments that show salient consumer preferences for the benefits provided by their products or services.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Mujde Yuksel, George R Milne and Elizabeth G Miller

This paper aims to explore the interaction between consumer empowerment and social interactions as fundamental social media elements. It demonstrates their relationship in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the interaction between consumer empowerment and social interactions as fundamental social media elements. It demonstrates their relationship in both experiential and informative social media setting where social media complements an offline consumer activity. The study aims to contribute to the literature on social media by demonstrating its complementary role on offline activities through these fundamental elements.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports three experimental designs that manipulate the empowering and the socializing elements of complementary activities to show their effects on both the complementary online and the complemented offline activities.

Findings

The paper presents three empirical studies that reveal the effects of two fundamental social media elements (i.e. empowerment and socialization) on consumers’ responses toward consumption episodes that consist of complementary online and complemented offline activities. It reveals that that these elements increase positive consumer responses toward both the online and the offline activities through psychological empowerment. However, the interaction between the elements changes with respect to specific empowerment types.

Research limitations/implications

The paper contributes to the literature on social media by demonstrating its complementary role on offline activities through its empowering and socializing elements. It bridges research on consumer empowerment and socialization in a way that reveals their interaction beyond the extant definitions of empowerment resulting from enhanced communication among consumers. The paper also demonstrates the complementary role of social media on offline consumer behaviors through the effects of these two fundamental elements.The participants of the experimental studies are presented with hypothetical scenarios and asked about their behavioral intentions. Thus, future studies should address the research questions in real-world settings.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for social media usage as a complementary activity to offline real-life consumer behavior through the effects of consumer empowerment and social interactions. Thus, it may benefit marketers seeking to optimize the empowering and socializing components of their social media strategies.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study how social media may affect real-life consumer behavior. It also identifies the interaction between the empowering and the socializing elements of social media offerings in both experiential and informative settings.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2013

Andrew Rohm, Velitchka D. Kaltcheva and George R. Milne

Online social media are dramatically changing the ways in which firms and their consumers interact. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role of social media…

Abstract

Purpose

Online social media are dramatically changing the ways in which firms and their consumers interact. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role of social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter among younger consumers (“digital natives”) in their interactions with brands. To investigate this, the authors conduct a mixed-method study including latent class analysis (LCA) to examine the role of social media among younger consumers (referred to as “digital natives”) in their interactions with brands.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method approach including both qualitative analysis and LCA was used to analyze daily interactions between consumers and specific brands across two primary social media platforms (Facebook and Twitter). Data were collected by means of a social media platforms (Facebook and Twitter). Data were collected by means of a social media diary collected over a one-week period.

Findings

The findings from this study suggest that brand-consumer interactions driven by social media can be characterized by five primary motivations or themes: entertainment, brand engagement (specifically identification with or connection to the brand), timeliness of information and service responses, product information, and incentives and promotions. The authors also identify relationships among these themes related to respondents' age, gender, and social media use.

Research limitations/implications

Although social media have become a widespread form of communication and interaction between brands and consumers, research regarding the nature of social media-driven brand-consumer interactions is only now developing. Drawing on the perspectives of consumer online engagement and uses and gratifications theory, the results from this study are important to guiding future brand-customer interaction research. These findings help extend previous research by identifying consumer motivations that underlie social media usage in brand engagement.

Practical implications

These results highlight the role of social media in helping brands to be proactive in their consumer communications and interactions, in areas such as communicating product information, addressing customer service issues, engaging consumers with content relevant to the brand, providing timely information regarding promotions and new product launches, and fostering consumer-generated comments. Managers should also recognize that younger digital natives interact with brands via social media differently (e.g. for pure entertainment) than older individuals.

Originality/value

This study provides new insights to the nature of brand-consumer interactions, engagement, and outcomes driven by social media.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Andrew J. Rohm, Vishal Kashyap, Thomas G. Brashear and George R. Milne

The promise of B2B e‐commerce had led to an explosion in the number of e‐marketplaces as firms adopted a “launch and learn” strategy. However a cash crisis and continuing…

Abstract

The promise of B2B e‐commerce had led to an explosion in the number of e‐marketplaces as firms adopted a “launch and learn” strategy. However a cash crisis and continuing losses led to tremendous consolidation in these marketplaces. This scenario was mirrored in Latin America too. With the growing importance of B2B e‐commerce worldwide, Latin American firms cannot ignore the competitive advantages that accrue by employing the Internet into their strategies. This paper presents a variety of decision models that small and medium enterprises can employ to integrate the Internet into their business decisions and thereby remain competitive.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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