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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Thuckavadee Sthienrapapayut, George P. Moschis and Anil Mathur

The purpose of this study is to test the efficiency of the “gerontographics” model in predicting selected consumer behaviours in older adults.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to test the efficiency of the “gerontographics” model in predicting selected consumer behaviours in older adults.

Design/methodology/approach

Through regression analysis, a large sample of older Thai adults is used to test the predictive power of gerontographics against predictive measures based on both chronological age and cognitive age.

Findings

The findings of the study show that the gerontographics model is more powerful in predicting certain types of older adults’ consumer behaviour than chronological age or cognitive age.

Originality/value

These findings have implications for marketing and business strategies because they suggest that gerontographics segmentation may be a more useful and effective way to segment older consumers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Pattharanitcha Prakitsuwan, George P. Moschis and Randall Shannon

This study aims to show how the increasingly popular life course paradigm (LCP) can be employed as an alternative to the successful aging perspective (SAP) as an…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to show how the increasingly popular life course paradigm (LCP) can be employed as an alternative to the successful aging perspective (SAP) as an overarching conceptual research framework to study elderly consumers' financial well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of 804 Thai consumers over the age of 45 selected via the snowball method.

Findings

Significant results were found for hypotheses derived from the LCP for older consumers' financial well-being, suggesting critical roles of early life experiences, developmental factors, adaptation mechanisms and contextual factors.

Originality/value

This paper shows how efforts to study consumers over the course of their lives can be improved by utilizing the principles and theoretical perspectives of the LCP and offers research directions for studying not only older consumer well-being but also numerous consumer behavior issues at any stage of life in an innovative way.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Pattharanitcha Prakitsuwan and George P. Moschis

This study aims to illustrate the viability of the life course paradigm (LCP), which is increasingly used by social and behavioral scientists to study a wide variety of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to illustrate the viability of the life course paradigm (LCP), which is increasingly used by social and behavioral scientists to study a wide variety of phenomena, as a framework for studying the transformational role of service consumption in improving consumer well-being in later life.

Design/methodology/approach

The LCP is used to develop a life course model for studying the effects of service consumption on older people’s well-being. Previous research related to the consumption of specific types of services (financial and healthcare) is integrated within the multi-theoretical LCP to suggest relevant model variables and derive a set of propositions for illustrating the effects of service consumption on older adults’ well-being.

Findings

The research presented in this study shows how efforts to study the effects of service consumption on older people’s well-being can be improved by using the LCP, helps understand the onset and changes in service consumption patterns and illustrates an innovative way to study the role of services in promoting older consumer welfare.

Originality/value

By applying the principles and theoretical perspectives of the LCP, this study contributes to recent transformative service research efforts to better understand the impact of service consumption on people’s lives and the transformational role of services and service providers in improving consumer and societal welfare.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

George P. Moschis, Jodie L. Ferguson and Meng Zhu

This study seeks to examine mature consumers' motives in the selection of apparel and footwear brands and reasons for patronizing department stores. Differences in…

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3215

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to examine mature consumers' motives in the selection of apparel and footwear brands and reasons for patronizing department stores. Differences in brand‐choice motives are assessed among age cohort groups within the mature consumers segment as well as mature consumer segments defined by various socio‐demographic and lifestyle factors (i.e. gerontographic segmentation).

Design/methodology/approach

A USA nation‐wide random sample of 10,400 head of households was surveyed in regards to reasons for choosing apparel and footwear brands and department stores.

Findings

The results show that older consumers not only differ from their younger counterparts but are also heterogeneous when it comes to reasons for choosing specific brands and department stores. Specifically, price reductions and special sales drive the majority of mature consumers' brand selection, while advice or requests of spouse or other relatives and recommendations of salespeople are important factors in brand selection. Ease of returning products or getting refunds and frequency of items on sale are the main drivers of department store patronization.

Practical implications

Marketing managers should consider preference differences in age and gerontographic segments when creating marketing strategies to serve mature consumers.

Originality/value

Typically, mature consumers are aggregated into a single age segment (e.g. over 55). This study examines mature consumer reasons for selecting apparel and footwear brands and department stores based not just on age, but also on individual characteristics, specifically, gerontographic characteristics. Suggestions for marketing strategies designed to appeal to gerontographic segments are provided.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 39 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

George P. Moschis

Discusses a new method of market segmentation in the mature market.Develops a model based on research in various disciplines and data fromvarious studies. Suggests that…

Abstract

Discusses a new method of market segmentation in the mature market. Develops a model based on research in various disciplines and data from various studies. Suggests that this model is more effective than some traditional methods, not only in identifying segments but also in choosing marketing strategies for reaching specific segments of the mature market.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Jack A. Lesser and Lakshmi K. Thumurluri

Much of human behaviour is viewed as a process, which begins with early childhood experience, and develops into later life emotions, values, beliefs, and behaviours…

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512

Abstract

Much of human behaviour is viewed as a process, which begins with early childhood experience, and develops into later life emotions, values, beliefs, and behaviours. Described below, considerable interdisciplinary attention has been given to the role of childhood, and more specifically, to the relevance of different types of parental influence on children as they later become adults. Within marketing, selected scholarly consideration has been devoted to the roles of parents on their children's existing consumer behaviour. The unique contribution of this article is to examine the role of different types of parental influence on later adulthood shopping behaviours.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 20 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

George P. Moschis and Leah Bovell

Because the growth in the elderly population is a worldwide phenomenon, it is essential for businesses to develop an understanding of the older consumer market. Older…

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6359

Abstract

Purpose

Because the growth in the elderly population is a worldwide phenomenon, it is essential for businesses to develop an understanding of the older consumer market. Older consumers are especially important to companies operating in the pharmaceutical industry, since they spend more on medical supplies and drugs than any other age group. The aim of this paper is to examine older consumers' preferences for sources of information and methods of purchasing prescription drugs and cosmetics, as well as the reasons they choose specific drug stores and specific brands of drugs and health aids.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a large national sample and various statistical procedures. Responses given to selected attitudinal and behavioral measures were tabulated and cross-tabulated by selected demographic and other characteristics. Grouping of older Americans into four segments based on aging characteristics and life events circumstances was achieved by means of cluster analysis.

Findings

The research presented in this paper shows major differences in the way older consumers respond to various marketing offerings. The responses of older Americans do not only differ from those of their younger counterparts; they also vary widely by psychographic characteristics that are based on aging, life-changing events and circumstances older consumers have experienced. The results provide the bases for recommended strategies to most effectively appeal to older consumers in general, as well as to members of specific segments.

Practical implications

The study helps marketers of pharmaceutical products improve their efforts when marketing to older consumers.

Originality/value

Unlike previous studies that examine choices of pharmaceutical and cosmetic products by older consumers as a homogeneous group, the present study treats these consumers as a heterogeneous market and examines their motives for their choices.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

George P. Moschis and Scott B. Friend

While the mature consumer segment (55‐and‐older) is rapidly growing in size, so too are their preferences, motives and spending patterns. The health‐care product and…

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2062

Abstract

Purpose

While the mature consumer segment (55‐and‐older) is rapidly growing in size, so too are their preferences, motives and spending patterns. The health‐care product and services industry, an industry driven by age, is no exception to the need to identify and accurately target this aging consumer segment. The purpose of this paper is to report on the preferences and marketing implications of this mature consumer segment with respect to health‐care products and services.

Design/methodology/approach

The information reported in this paper comes from two large‐scale national studies. The first study gathered information on health‐care services, information sources, payment systems, attitudes toward health‐care providers, and shopping habits. The second study gathered information on selected health‐care products, mass media habits, and several types of health‐related concerns and lifestyles.

Findings

The results of these studies show major differences in the way in which consumers within the mature consumer segment respond to various health‐care marketing offerings and provide the basis for developing strategic recommendations for marketing health‐care products and services to the mature population.

Originality/value

This paper uses a segmentation model based on aging processes and life circumstances, known as “gerontographics.” This unique segmentation technique has demonstrated superiority over the past 20 years through research conducted at the Center for Mature Consumer Studies at Georgia State University.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

George P. Moschis

Presents a new way of segmenting the mature market. Develops asegmentation model based on research in various disciplines and usesdata from several studies to validate it…

Abstract

Presents a new way of segmenting the mature market. Develops a segmentation model based on research in various disciplines and uses data from several studies to validate it. Suggests that the model is more effective than some commonly used approaches, not only in identifying prime segments for products and services, but also in suggesting viable marketing strategies for reaching specific segments of older consumers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Anil Mathur and George P. Moschis

States that although the concept of “stress” has received increased attention in the behavioral and social sciences throughout the past five decades, it has been virtually…

Downloads
2533

Abstract

States that although the concept of “stress” has received increased attention in the behavioral and social sciences throughout the past five decades, it has been virtually ignored by consumer researchers. Presents conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of stress research, which suggest that many changes in individuals’ consumption behaviors are efforts to cope with stressful life circumstances. A study was conducted to test specific hypotheses about the effects of stress on consumption‐coping strategies of older adults. Results suggest that when older consumers experience stressful life circumstances, they may initiate, intensify, or change consumption activities to handle stress. Specific coping strategies were found to differ by gender. Implications for future consumer research are discussed.

Details

Journal of Marketing Practice: Applied Marketing Science, vol. 5 no. 6/7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2538

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