Search results

1 – 10 of 43
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

George K. Chako

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or…

Downloads
5241

Abstract

Briefly reviews previous literature by the author before presenting an original 12 step system integration protocol designed to ensure the success of companies or countries in their efforts to develop and market new products. Looks at the issues from different strategic levels such as corporate, international, military and economic. Presents 31 case studies, including the success of Japan in microchips to the failure of Xerox to sell its invention of the Alto personal computer 3 years before Apple: from the success in DNA and Superconductor research to the success of Sunbeam in inventing and marketing food processors: and from the daring invention and production of atomic energy for survival to the successes of sewing machine inventor Howe in co‐operating on patents to compete in markets. Includes 306 questions and answers in order to qualify concepts introduced.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 12 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

George K. Chacko

Develops an original 12‐step management of technology protocol and applies it to 51 applications which range from Du Pont’s failure in Nylon to the Single Online Trade…

Downloads
2424

Abstract

Develops an original 12‐step management of technology protocol and applies it to 51 applications which range from Du Pont’s failure in Nylon to the Single Online Trade Exchange for Auto Parts procurement by GM, Ford, Daimler‐Chrysler and Renault‐Nissan. Provides many case studies with regards to the adoption of technology and describes seven chief technology officer characteristics. Discusses common errors when companies invest in technology and considers the probabilities of success. Provides 175 questions and answers to reinforce the concepts introduced. States that this substantial journal is aimed primarily at the present and potential chief technology officer to assist their survival and success in national and international markets.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 14 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

George K. Chacko

Gives an in depth view of the strategies pursued by the world’s leading chief executive officers in an attempt to provide guidance to new chief executives of today…

Downloads
7129

Abstract

Gives an in depth view of the strategies pursued by the world’s leading chief executive officers in an attempt to provide guidance to new chief executives of today. Considers the marketing strategies employed, together with the organizational structures used and looks at the universal concepts that can be applied to any product. Uses anecdotal evidence to formulate a number of theories which can be used to compare your company with the best in the world. Presents initial survival strategies and then looks at ways companies can broaden their boundaries through manipulation and choice. Covers a huge variety of case studies and examples together with a substantial question and answer section.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 11 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

George K. Chacko

Wireless communication comprises telecommunications industry products and services which move voice, video, data, and graphics at the speed of the electron. But wireless…

Abstract

Wireless communication comprises telecommunications industry products and services which move voice, video, data, and graphics at the speed of the electron. But wireless is far more than products and services; it is the very backbone of the Internet. We have today a wireless world which two Chief ‘Ntrepreneur Officers (CNOs) – American Sam Ginn and Britisher Chris Gent – created during the 16 years between the Olympics in Los Angeles (1984) and Olympics in Sydney (2000).

Details

Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

George K. Chacko

Studies five successful chief ’ntrepreneur officers (CNOs) together with one failure. Looks at why the CNO is indispensable. Presents 36 characteristics of CNOs across six…

Abstract

Studies five successful chief ’ntrepreneur officers (CNOs) together with one failure. Looks at why the CNO is indispensable. Presents 36 characteristics of CNOs across six groups: eagerly embracing risk, passionately innovating, creating/harnessing disequilibria, empowering the middle management, empowering top management with complementing industry product and participants and with complementing capital products and providers. Uses numerous case studies to demonstrate theory and provide a number of questions and answers.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 25 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

George K. Chacko, Kelvin Tan Thean Beng, Agatha Yeoh Siew Ling, Nazlina Nasihin, Harlimi Muhamad and Ong Jiun Jye

What should a Multi‐National Corporation (MNC) like UMW Toyota Motor Sdn. Bhd. set as its targeted growth in revenue by the Year 2020 to help its host country Malaysia…

Downloads
2163

Abstract

What should a Multi‐National Corporation (MNC) like UMW Toyota Motor Sdn. Bhd. set as its targeted growth in revenue by the Year 2020 to help its host country Malaysia realise its “Vision 2020”? To survive/succeed, Toyota has to anticipate its high technology niche, which is but a “Technological Gleam” today in the eye of Toyota’s “Technical Entrepreneur”. Significant segments of corporate resources will not be committed to the “Technological Gleam” unless the “Technical Entrepreneur” can present an irresistible transformation boost converting the Technology‐Push into Market‐Pull. What will be the market for the hitech product embodying the yet‐to‐emerge hitech? What present product is closest to the potential product? Can its life cycle profile be applied to the potential product? Using the theoretical structure of the Management Of TEchnology Protocol (MOTEP), we analyze Toyota’s transition from the present hybrid fuel (gasoline‐and‐hydrogen combination) to the potential hydrogen fuel in five years.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 25 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Zabid Abdul Rashid and George K. Chacko

Presents the findings of 700 CEO/senior managers regarding general strategy and competitiveness in the Malaysian electrical and electronic industry. Outlines four major…

Downloads
1027

Abstract

Presents the findings of 700 CEO/senior managers regarding general strategy and competitiveness in the Malaysian electrical and electronic industry. Outlines four major strategies, cost, differentiation, cost‐price and marketing/focus. Addresses the question, “is the battle to the low‐cost, low‐price vendor?” Uses two case studies, IBM and Samsung as examples to emulate for long term survival.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

In the era of dramatic developments in technology worldwide, the relative competitiveness of a corporation/country over time has to be continuously calibrated and…

Abstract

In the era of dramatic developments in technology worldwide, the relative competitiveness of a corporation/country over time has to be continuously calibrated and pro‐actively protected. Here, for the first time, we develop two sufficient conditions, and 12 necessary conditions of continuous competitiveness (CC): the ratio of value‐added per unit of currency of OUR product (service) to THEIR product (service). In Chapter 1, we apply CC to three corporations (IBM, CEC, API) and to three countries (Japan, Taiwan, Korea). At a time when IBM enjoyed 80 percent of the market, it decided to commit 83 percent of the next four years' TOTAL SALES to build a new generation of computers on the unproven technology of integrated circuits to assure IBM's continuous competitiveness. To the same end, Japan pro‐actively selected the growth industry of each decade beginning in the '50s (computers), and nurtured it, taxing other industries. The first year in which the US trade with the Pacific exceeded that of the Atlantic, 1982, is the benchmark of a study of competitiveness of two countries of comparable population and exports, Korea and Taiwan. If Taiwan exports rose in volume but lost in profitability, Taiwan needs to make better products cheaper and faster. If the required technology advances are not fully available domestically, they need to be imported: Which is the rationale of technology transfer (techtransfer). Techtransfer can meet one of the necessary conditions of CC, viz., the desired technological progression‐from linear extensions of performance characteristics along the same curve, to quantum jumps from one technology curve to another. The techtransfer over two decades from IBM‐Taiwan to Taiwan Manufacturers as a whole progressed from components to complete product: Which could be considered at best as linear extensions of performance characteristics. For a country like Taiwan, whose trade (i.e. exports + imports) is as much as 94.8% of GNP, and which does not have a highly developed R&D base, techtransfer is a prime means of upgrading the technology. We will examine two Taiwan corporations which expanded exports through techtransfer: one, a Taiwan components manufacturer; and two, a Taiwan power supply manufacturer. As vendors to IBM, they aggressively pursued techtransfer from IBM. These empirical applications set the stage to examine Malaysian experience of E&E in Chapter 2.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 9 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

George K. Chacko

Case Studies generally ask: (1) What accounts for the success/failure of this real‐life “Case” (Corporation, Government or Organization)?; (2) How can we transport the…

Downloads
1184

Abstract

Case Studies generally ask: (1) What accounts for the success/failure of this real‐life “Case” (Corporation, Government or Organization)?; (2) How can we transport the lessons learned across time and space?; (3) What immediate/eventual issue/objective(s) should the “Case” pursue to enhance its survival/success; and How? The student is graded on the Case Study on the force of his/her reasoning and arguments, two diametrically‐opposite action plans both scoring “A”. But which one should the CEO implement? Why? Are there minimal criteria that any Case Study of management should fulfill? The raison d etre of management is the pre‐committing of scarce resources for unknown/unknowable results (e.g., market share, mind share), which are generated by interactions of variables and/or participants. Does the Case Study identify the cogent interactions; does it suggest how to allocate resources to achieve pre‐specified results? This Case Study has been checked by the corporation for accuracy. Westructure the narrative by systems theory which provides a framework to assess what the company has achieved, and to formulate what it should do to improve its chances of survival/success. The theory is buttressed by illustrations of systems approach to complexity, ranging from Apollo lunar landing to the $91‐billion IT Services Company, IBM. According to National Association of Software and Services Companies (NASSCOM), IT exports rose 30.5 percent to $12.5 billion in Fiscal Year 2003‐04 ending on March 31, 2004 from $9.6 billion in Fiscal 2002‐03. Indian exports totaled $52.72 billion in 2003‐04. Applying the growth in the first five months, we estimate the total exports in 2003‐04 at $54.8 billion. The IT exports contributed 18.2 per cent in 2002‐03, rising to 22.8 percent in 2003‐04.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

Bill Gates, who feels that with respect to Windows and CDROMs, he overestimated in the short‐run, and underestimated in the long‐run, would probably expect Broadband…

Abstract

Bill Gates, who feels that with respect to Windows and CDROMs, he overestimated in the short‐run, and underestimated in the long‐run, would probably expect Broadband Network Technology (BNT) to arrive in less than a decade. No matter when BNT arrives, there is a fundamental question that has to be raised and answered, which is the theme of this chapter: the UTILIZATION of the exploding multimedia content of the Information Superskyway. How will people USE 1,000 times the current content, arriving 1,000 times as fast? We discuss nine imperative issues of utilization. (1) Use of Content on the Information Superskyway. More than 20 years before IT became a household word, the US National Science Foundation issued a Request for Proposal entitled: “Systems Approach to Evaluate the Use of Science and Technology Information in the Electronic Alternative to Paper‐based Communication.” The same approach is germane toward the use of the entire IT content today. (2) Use of IT Data in Corporate Decision‐Making. In 1972, IBM headquarters removed the computer consoles placed next to the desk of senior executives because the computers were hardly used in two years. How can nonuse be avoided? (3) Networks obsoleting skills, structure. The fusion of computers and communications empowers all the workers to form, dissolve, and re‐form networks based on their relative competitiveness. With the ability to source globally, virtual corporations can be formed, dissolved, and re‐formed based on their competitiveness and credibility. (4) Significant resource commitment to unproven technology. With the very survival of Great Britain at stake, the non‐specialist Churchill had to lay all the technology eggs in the single basket called the “radar,” trusting that “the promises made by our scientists for the still unproven radar would be kept.” It would remain unproven for four years yet. (5) Sensitivity of significant resource commitment to technology forecast. Far more tenuous than the “promises for radar” was Einstein's opinion that nuclear‐energy could be released. Roosevelt launched the atomic bomb project on that opinion. Had he sought a second opinion from an eminent physicist like Niels Bohr, he would have questioned Einstein's opinion as scientific arm‐waving. (6) Sensitivity of significant resource commitment to technology‐generated market forecast. Churchill's reliance on Lindemann for technology advice is echoed in IBM CEO Watson's reliance on Birkenstock. In 1948, the latter encouraged the former to stand up against Watson, Sr. and abandon punch cards for magnetic tape. In 1956, he persuaded Watson, Jr. to negotiate with Texas Instruments to cut down the price of IC to $1.50, making it economically feasible to use IC in System/360. (7) Protection of Primogeniture of Ideas on the Internet. In order not to inhibit the inventor from collaborative interactions, the paternity of seminal ideas has to be unambiguously established when interactive exchanges are instantaneous, as on the Internet. (8) Inter‐disciplinary (synergistic) linguistics. The prerequisite to any inter‐disciplinary communication is the ability of each to understand one language in addition to one's own discipline. A truly inter‐disciplinary language would enable those in different disciplines to communicate with everyone else, enabling synergy to be generated. (8) Putting the Content in the Context. The explosion of instantaneous data racing thousand times as fast as at present is sand without substance, unless the symbols written in sand are given substance by the context of the decision‐maker. The data should be ordered and processed to answer questions of the type: Must I expand the external boundaries; if so, in which direction? Must I expand the internal boundaries; if so, in which direction?

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 9 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

1 – 10 of 43