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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Alexa K. Fox, George D. Deitz, Marla B. Royne and Joseph D. Fox

Online consumer reviews (OCRs) have emerged as a particularly important type of user-generated information about a brand because of their widespread adoption and influence…

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1624

Abstract

Purpose

Online consumer reviews (OCRs) have emerged as a particularly important type of user-generated information about a brand because of their widespread adoption and influence on consumer decision-making. Much of the existing OCR research focuses on quantifiable OCR features such as star ratings and volume. More research that examines the influence of review elements, aside from numeric ratings, such as the verbatim text, particularly in services contexts is needed. The purpose of this research is to investigate the impact of service failures on consumer arousal and emotions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors present three behavioral experiments that manipulate service failure and linguistic elements of OCRs by using galvanic skin response, survey measures and automated facial expression analysis.

Findings

Negative OCRs lead to the greatest levels of arousal when consumers read OCRs. Service failure severity impacts anger, and referential cohesion, an observable property of text that helps a reader better understand ideas in the text, negatively moderates the relationship between service failure severity and anger.

Originality/value

The authors are among the first to empirically test the effect of emotional contagion in a user-generated content context, demonstrating that it can occur when consumers read such content, even if they did not experience the events being described. The research uses a self-report and physiological measures to assess consumer perceptions, arousal and emotions related to service failures, increasing the robustness of the literature. These findings contribute to the marketing literature on OCRs in service failures, physiological measures of consumers’ emotions, the negativity bias and emotional contagion in a user-generated content context.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

John D. Hansen, George D. Deitz and Robert M. Morgan

This study aims to present a taxonomic framework that categorizes hotel loyalty program members on the basis of involvement and a mix of behavioral outcome variables.

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2348

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to present a taxonomic framework that categorizes hotel loyalty program members on the basis of involvement and a mix of behavioral outcome variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The taxonomy is derived through mixture modeling from a sample of 1,395 loyalty program members of two global hotel chains.

Findings

Study results suggest the presence of four classes of program members across both hotels. Class members differ with respect to the attitudes they hold, the behaviors they exhibit, and the motivations they have for maintaining membership in the program.

Practical implications

First, the study enhances understanding of member differences that exist within loyalty programs. Second, the study advances understanding of the ways through which loyalty programs can best be managed. Third, the study illustrates the usefulness of mixture modeling as a classificatory tool.

Research limitations/implications

Study results are not generalizable beyond the sample used in deriving them. Further, decisions pertaining to what variables to include in developing a taxonomic framework are critical to its usefulness. The choice to include certain variables as well as their related measures, to the exclusion of others, represents a second limitation.

Originality/value

The study is but the second to empirically categorize loyalty program members, and the first to do so in a services context. Two classes of high‐involvement customers emerge, each with contrasting attitudes and behaviors. Thus, our findings suggest that high levels of involvement invoke the most extreme of customer attitudes and behaviors.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Gensheng (Jason) Liu and George D. Deitz

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of supply chain management in enabling manufacturers' mass customization capabilities.

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3264

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of supply chain management in enabling manufacturers' mass customization capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based upon survey data from 262 manufacturing plants, spanning nine countries and three industries. Responses from multiple employees were aggregated for each item. Hypothesized relationships between variables were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results generally indicate that plant mass customization capabilities are driven by customer‐focused product design and reduced supplier lead times. In turn, these factors are driven by management's emphasis on supply chain planning. Post hoc tests show that the effects of supply chain planning on mass customization capabilities are fully mediated by customer‐focused product design and reduced supplier lead time.

Originality/value

While the literature suggests that mass customization depends upon a dynamic extended enterprise, extant empirical work has focused on internal firm characteristics. The paper is among the first to examine the significance of supply chain management upon the development of mass customization capabilities.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Ugur Yavas, Emin Babakus, George D. Deitz and Subhash Jha

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relative efficacies of intrinsic and extrinsic cues as drivers of customer loyalty to financial institutions between male…

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1532

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relative efficacies of intrinsic and extrinsic cues as drivers of customer loyalty to financial institutions between male and female bank customers.

Design/methodology/approach

A large-scale survey of 872 customers of a national bank serves as the study setting.

Findings

Results showed that extrinsic cues were the more effective correlates of customer loyalty and that gender does not moderate the relationships between image cues and customer loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional nature of the current study does not allow causal inferences. Therefore, future studies should adopt longitudinal designs.

Practical implications

Results suggest that, although transmitting a favorable image through extrinsic cues is critical, nevertheless, intrinsic cues (interactions among customers and bank personnel) should not be ignored. To reinforce this not only among current customers but also among potential customers, banks should use advertisements featuring favorable testimonials.

Originality/value

Empirical research in the banking services literature pertaining to the efficacies of intrinsic and extrinsic cues in forming customer loyalty is scarce. This study fills in the void. Also, in determining if the relationships between image and customer loyalty vary by gender, the authors not only looked at male versus female differences on the basis of average construct scores but also examined the structural relationships among the constructs.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Mert Tokman and Lauren S. Beitelspacher

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458

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Haozhe Chen

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1633

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

George Deitz, John D. Hansen, Tom DeCarlo and Emin Babakus

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of store managers’ employee climate perceptions on frontline employee (FLE), customer and store performance outcomes in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of store managers’ employee climate perceptions on frontline employee (FLE), customer and store performance outcomes in the small-store setting.

Design/methodology/approach

This study derives the findings from a multi-source data set acquired in partnership with a North American-based retailer that includes survey responses from 1,133 store managers, 5,591 FLEs and 16,488 customers. This paper matches survey responses to corporate records and store sales and operations data.

Findings

This study finds that store managers’ employee climate perceptions affect FLEs both directly and indirectly, through store manager social support behaviors. This paper tests the boundary conditions for these findings by examining the moderating effects of store-level FLE tenure heterogeneity and competitive intensity. Study results provide partial support for the hypothesized relationships with regard to FLE tenure heterogeneity, but not competitive intensity.

Research limitations/implications

This research is subject to many of the limitations common to a survey-based study. While the use of one retailer provided opportunities to examine store-level performance data, future research would benefit by using a more expansive data set spanning several companies and industries. Moreover, as the current study was set in the small-store setting, future research should explore how store managers’ influence fluctuates depending on store size and the mechanisms through which organizational priorities flow through other management levels (e.g. department managers) in large retailers.

Practical implications

Study results provide managerial guidance regarding the implementation of an employee climate for the delivery of an enhanced customer experience and superior financial performance.

Originality/value

Although researchers have paid considerable attention to employees’ psychological and organizational climate perceptions, this study makes a unique contribution by examining the effects of store managers’ employee climate perceptions on FLE, customer and store-level outcomes.

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2021

G. T. Lumpkin and Robert J. Pidduck

Entrepreneurial orientation (EO) has emerged as a core concept in the field of entrepreneurship. Yet, there continue to be questions about the nature of EO and how best to…

Abstract

Entrepreneurial orientation (EO) has emerged as a core concept in the field of entrepreneurship. Yet, there continue to be questions about the nature of EO and how best to conceptualize and measure it. This chapter makes the case that EO has grown beyond its roots as a firm-level unidimensional strategy construct and that a new multidimensional version of EO is needed to capture the diverse manifestations and venues for entrepreneurial activity that are now evident around the world – global entrepreneurial orientation (GEO). Building on the five-dimension multidimensional view of EO set forth when Lumpkin and Dess (1996) extended the work of Miller (1983) and Covin and Slevin (1989, 1991), the chapter offers an updated definition of EO and a fresh interpretation of why EO matters theoretically. Despite earnest efforts to reconcile the different approaches to EO, in order to move the study of EO and the theoretical conversation about it forward, we maintain that as a group of scholars and a field, we need to acknowledge that two different versions of EO have emerged. Given that, we consider original approaches to measuring EO, evaluate formative measurement models, consider multiple levels of analysis, call for renewed attention to EO configurations, and discuss whether there is a theory of EO.

Details

Entrepreneurial Orientation: Epistemological, Theoretical, and Empirical Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-572-1

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2018

Thomas Stafford, George Deitz and Yaojie Li

The purpose of the study is to investigate the role of information security policy compliance and the role of information systems auditing in identifying non-compliance in…

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1989

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to investigate the role of information security policy compliance and the role of information systems auditing in identifying non-compliance in the workplace, with specific focus on the role of non-malicious insiders who unknowingly or innocuously thwart corporate information security (IS) directives by engaging in unsafe computing practices. The ameliorative effects of auditor-identified training and motivational programs to emphasize pro-security behaviors are explored.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies qualitative case analysis of technology user security perceptions combined with interpretive analysis of depth interviews with auditors to examine and explain the rubrics of non-malicious technology user behaviors in violation of cybersecurity directives, to determine the ways in which auditors can best assist management in overcoming the problems associated with security complacency among users.

Findings

Enterprise risk management benefits from audits that identify technology users who either feel invulnerable to cyber threats and exploits or feel that workplace exigencies augur for expedient workarounds of formal cybersecurity policies.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for consideration of CyberComplacency and Cybersecurity Loafing expand the insider threat perspective beyond the traditional malicious insider perspective.

Practical implications

Implications for consideration of CyberComplacency and Cybersecurity Loafing include broadened perspectives for the consultative role of IS audit in the firm.

Social implications

CyberComplacency is a practice that has great potential for harm in all walks of life. A better understanding of these potential harms is beneficial.

Originality/value

This study is the first to characterize CyberComplacency as computer users who feel they operate invulnerable platforms and are subsequently motivated to engage in less cybersecurity diligence than the company would desire. This study is also the first to characterize the notion of Cybersecurity Loafing to describe technically competent workers who take unauthorized but expedient steps around certain security polices in the name of workgroup efficiency.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Joshua V. White, Sanjay Chaudhary and Vishal K. Gupta

The concept of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) attracts considerable attention in the organizational literature. Focusing on issues related to measurement of EO and using…

Abstract

The concept of entrepreneurial orientation (EO) attracts considerable attention in the organizational literature. Focusing on issues related to measurement of EO and using a three-pronged framework to organize the growing diversity of EO measures, the authors conduct a systematic literature review on how EO is captured and assessed in the empirical literature. Specifically, the authors classify 551 empirical works according to the approach to measurement (i.e., managerial perceptions, content analysis, and resource allocations) which allows the authors to document and critically analyze prevalent measurement practices within the literature. Based on the synthesis, the authors identify key measurement-related tensions that may inhibit cumulative knowledge development in the area of EO, such as ad hoc modification of seminal scales and lack of theoretical clarity with respect to measurement. Additionally, the authors find that research into the antecedents of EO as well as causality and temporality of the phenomenon is underdeveloped, which the authors attribute to scarce use of mixed methods. The authors conclude chapter by discussing the challenges involved in measuring EO and offering possible recommendations for future inquiry.

Details

Entrepreneurial Orientation: Epistemological, Theoretical, and Empirical Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-572-1

Keywords

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