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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Christina Giakoumaki, George J. Avlonitis and George Baltas

The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of ingredient advertising. Specifically, the authors consider the question as to whether ingredient advertising…

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1421

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of ingredient advertising. Specifically, the authors consider the question as to whether ingredient advertising can increase derived demand and favorably influence purchase intentions and attitudes toward the host product that incorporates the advertised B2B ingredient.

Design/methodology/approach

They conduct experiments in two host product categories using a three-group, between-subjects experimental design.

Findings

The findings of the study are revealing about the impact of ingredient advertising on the demand for host products, in which the advertised ingredients are incorporated. It is demonstrated that consumer advertising positively affects the attitude and purchase intention toward the host brand that incorporates the advertised industrial product. It is also found that the higher the importance of the advertised ingredient as an attribute of the host product, the greater the advertising effects on the consumer brand.

Practical implications

The findings imply that ingredient advertising can help marketers to stimulate derived demand in the sense that it makes consumer brands incorporating the advertised industrial product more attractive to consumers. The positive influence of ingredient advertisements is greater for industrial products that are perceived by consumers as very important ingredients of the final product as consumers are more prone to search for and process ingredient-related information and are also more likely to respond to it.

Originality/value

Despite the implementation of ingredient advertising campaigns by many B2B brands and the vast literature on conventional B2C advertising, there has been no previous attempt to investigate this issue in the empirical literature. This empirical study shows how ingredient advertising works and how it can benefit both buyers and suppliers of the advertised B2B products.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

George Baltas and Christina Giakoumaki

For several years, the classic car market has been attracting considerable media and public attention, but the research literature is virtually nonexistent. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

For several years, the classic car market has been attracting considerable media and public attention, but the research literature is virtually nonexistent. The purpose of this paper is to address the factors that determine the values of classic car models and explain the remarkable price differences among them.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops and tests a set of research hypotheses about the effects of model characteristics on market values in the context of a generalized hedonic price model that also accounts for heterogeneity among classic car brands.

Findings

It is demonstrated that classic car model values reside at several levels and are determined by observable characteristics pertaining to aesthetics, rarity, engineering and performance. In addition, we show that classic car marques play a critical role in the determination of model values and account for considerable variation in values, even after controlling for observable model attributes

Originality/value

This is one of the first empirical studies to address classic car model value formation. The findings reveal how measurable, observable factors determine classic car model values and augment our understanding of a very interesting but understudied market.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Marc Prieto, Valentina Stan, George Baltas and Stephanie Lawson

Recently, the sharing economy has attracted considerable attention. This emerging paradigm is driven by powerful technological forces and has the potential to change the…

Abstract

Purpose

Recently, the sharing economy has attracted considerable attention. This emerging paradigm is driven by powerful technological forces and has the potential to change the way consumers access very important markets such as the car market. Indeed, access-based consumption may attract more participants as it enables consumers’ freedom of lifestyle and more flexible identity projects. The empirical literature has so far paid very little attention to car sharing services; when it has, it has focussed mainly on people who are already using them. The purpose of this paper is to consider the drivers behind the adoption intention of car sharing services.

Design/methodology/approach

A large multinational survey is carried out in three European capitals: London, Madrid and Paris. Using quota sampling, 2,159 licensed car drivers are recruited through the online panel of TNS Sofres. The sample is representative of the population of licensed car drivers in each city. The questionnaire is developed using established scales from previous research. An OLS regression analysis is performed to test our hypotheses, with a likelihood of choosing a car sharing option as the dependent variable.

Findings

The study demonstrates that knowledge, environmentalism, possession-self link and involvement with cars are important determinants of consumer behaviour in the car sharing services market. In addition, the user demographics suggest a target market of younger, predominantly male and urban customers. The empirical findings are consistent across the three capital cities, implying that providers can market their car sharing services in a similar manner.

Practical implications

As important determinants of consumer behaviour in the car sharing services market are underlined, several managerial implications arise from the study. Car sharing providers should promote awareness to help people not only to expand their experience with the service but also to be informed about the potential environmental benefits. Further, a stronger possession-self link in the automotive context is suggestive of a greater willingness to use car sharing systems. Managers should also take into account that it is much more difficult to engage individuals in car sharing services who are highly involved with car, than those who express very little attachment to the product. As people under 45 years old are far more likely to use these services, this generation effect is progressively moving the frontiers of the car retailing sector to a broader mobility service sector.

Originality/value

The foremost contribution of this paper is to demonstrate empirically how consumer intention to use car sharing is driven. To do so, the study addresses the general population of car drivers, interviewing users of the service as well as non-users.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

George Baltas

This paper presents an empirical study on store brand demand and its determinants. A two‐stage model is considered, in which the consumer decides whether to buy store…

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4123

Abstract

This paper presents an empirical study on store brand demand and its determinants. A two‐stage model is considered, in which the consumer decides whether to buy store brands, as well as how to allocate category expenditure between retail and manufacturer brands. The first stage identifies the segment of store brand customers and the second level determines customer demand. The model incorporates consumer characteristics and examines their effects in the light of behavioural data. Discrete and continuous outcomes flow from the same preference structure and are determined by consumer characteristics. The results provide insights into explanatory factors and useful implications for brand management. Extensions of the present work are also discussed.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 37 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

George Baltas and Paraskevas C. Argouslidis

Store brands represent an important part of the consumer goods market and a prominent research area. The purpose of this paper is to address a well‐defined problem of…

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9691

Abstract

Purpose

Store brands represent an important part of the consumer goods market and a prominent research area. The purpose of this paper is to address a well‐defined problem of store brand research and is concerned with individual characteristics that explain heterogeneous preferences for store brands. Understanding how preferences vary with consumer factors is a key element in developing successful marketing strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey is designed and implemented to a large random sample of consumers, using computer‐assisted telephone interviewing.

Findings

Specific consumer characteristics are associated with interpersonal differences in store brand demand. Store brand preferences derive from a broader evaluation process, in which quality has the most significant role. The results also demonstrate the changing image of store brands, the endorsement of such products by consumers of higher socio‐economic status, and lead to important implications for both retailers and manufacturers of consumer products.

Originality/value

The paper introduces random sampling and telephone interviewing to store brand research and provides new insights for managers and researchers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

George Baltas

Nutrition labelling of food products has received considerable attention in the marketing literature due to increasing consumer interest in health and diet issues…

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5900

Abstract

Nutrition labelling of food products has received considerable attention in the marketing literature due to increasing consumer interest in health and diet issues. Nutrition labelling of food products is intended to enable informed consumer choices and stimulate the consumption and production of healthful products. Reviews nutrition labelling research, organises the literature, and discusses implications for policy makers, managers and researchers. Analysis of the literature suggests heterogeneous utilisation and comprehension of on‐pack nutrition information by consumers. The effectiveness of nutrition labelling depends also on the organisation and presentation of the information, implying the importance of regulatory issues. The topic is rich in public and marketing policy implications and provides several opportunities for further research.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 35 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Paraskevas Argouslidis, George Baltas and Alexis Mavrommatis

– This paper aims to consider decision speed’s role in the largely neglected decision area of product elimination.

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1062

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider decision speed’s role in the largely neglected decision area of product elimination.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on an inter-disciplinary theoretical background (e.g. organisational, decision speed and product elimination theories), the authors develop and test a framework for decision speed’s effects on the market and financial outcomes of a stratified random sample of 175 consumer product eliminations.

Findings

In contrast to decision speed research that hypothesised (and often failed to confirm) linearity, results show inverted ∪-shaped decision speed-to-decision outcomes relationships, with curvatures moderated by product importance, environmental complexity and turbulence.

Research limitations/implications

Findings are suggestive of several implications for the above theories (e.g. contribution to the dialogue about performance-enhancing value of rational vs incremental decision-making; evidence that excessive decision speed may become too much of a good thing). Certain design limitations (e.g. sampling consumer goods’ manufacturers only) point at avenues for future inquiry into the product elimination decision speed-to-outcomes link.

Practical implications

Managerially, the findings suggest that product eliminations’ optimal market and financial outcomes depend on a mix of speed and search in decision-making and that this mix requires adjustments to different levels of product importance, interdependencies with other decision areas of the firm and environmental turbulence.

Originality/value

The paper makes a twofold contribution. It enriches decision speed research, by empirically addressing speed’s outcomes in relation to a decision area that is not necessarily strategic and represents the first explicit empirical investigation into outcomes of decision speed in product line pruning decision-making.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 48 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

George Baltas and Paulina Papastathopoulou

Considers the brand and store choice behaviour of grocery shoppers and explores relationships among consumer characteristics, brand choice criteria and store selection…

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6593

Abstract

Considers the brand and store choice behaviour of grocery shoppers and explores relationships among consumer characteristics, brand choice criteria and store selection criteria. A survey was carried out to collect data on demographic profiles and decision criteria of shoppers in the Greek grocery sector. The data were collected through in‐store, personal interviews and subsequently analysed using descriptive as well as optimal scaling methods. The data reveal asymmetric evaluations of choice criteria and some clear and interesting patterns regarding the two choice processes. In addition, several associations between brand and store preferences are identified and related to specific demographic characteristics of the consumers. The present work is a first attempt at addressing these issues in the grocery Greek market and leaves considerable room for further research.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2009

George Baltas and Charalabos Saridakis

The purpose of this paper is to consider how product characteristics, segment differences, and brand‐name effects determine the price structure of the new car market.

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8009

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider how product characteristics, segment differences, and brand‐name effects determine the price structure of the new car market.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors design and implement a hedonic price model that includes functional characteristics and addresses segment and brand heterogeneity.

Findings

The application of the model to an extensive dataset supports the hypotheses of segment differences and brand‐name effects. In mainstream segments automobile prices are determined more completely by functional characteristics. In high‐end segments carmakers follow implicit premium pricing strategies. The brand‐name effects reflect the incremental value added to a car by its brand name. Prestige brands not only earn brand‐name premia but also seize high‐margin market segments.

Research limitations/implications

Several issues await investigation including possible discrepancies between the primary and secondary market, inter‐temporal change, and differences in attribute value across segments and marques.

Practical implications

The study has clear implications for auto manufactures, distributors and advertisers. It demonstrates the role of brands, segments, and observed product differences in the price structure of the automobile market. The proposed approach also allows managers to appraise new concepts and determine market‐driven prices.

Originality/value

The paper provides new interesting insights into critical issues for pricing strategy and brand management. It demonstrates the return on investment in brand building and identifies considerable opportunities for future research.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

George Baltas

The purpose of this paper is to consider a new application of stochastic frontier analysis, in which the method is applied to demand data for a food product category, in…

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1358

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider a new application of stochastic frontier analysis, in which the method is applied to demand data for a food product category, in an attempt to benchmark category consumption and segment food consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

In a unified, two‐stage approach, a stochastic frontier model is first estimated and subsequently deviations from the demand frontier are regressed on customer characteristics. The method is illustrated in scanner panel data.

Findings

A frontier demand function estimated in scanner data of a frequently‐bought food category has significant and consistent parameters. Specific descriptor variables can explain excessive category demand and profile customers with considerable sales potential.

Research limitations/implications

More work is needed to generalise the usefulness of the proposed model in different food categories. Future research may employ alternative functional specifications and explanatory variables.

Practical implications

The empirical identification of salient characteristics improves consumer understanding and can assist in the design of data‐driven marketing action. Applied researchers can use marketing and demographic variables that are found in standard consumer panels to estimate frontier models.

Originality/value

The paper introduces stochastic frontier analysis as a means to determine consumer differences in food demand. This is an important area for retailers, producers and researchers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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