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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

George Atkinson

Innovation is often wrongly blamed for building failures. It takes one of two forms:

Abstract

Innovation is often wrongly blamed for building failures. It takes one of two forms:

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Structural Survey, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

George Atkinson

Discusses the relatively close links between essential requirementsand technical requirements in the Building Regulations of England andWales and several continental…

Abstract

Discusses the relatively close links between essential requirements and technical requirements in the Building Regulations of England and Wales and several continental European states, concentrating on a specific examination of regulations for fire safety and how it is handled in the systems of Federal Germany and France. Highlights the very different governmental systems in these two countries and how this affects Building Regulations.

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Structural Survey, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1976

Susan Ardis

The following reviews are intended to help take some of the mystery and terror out of selecting guides to edible fungi for the amateur. The books chosen for review are all…

Abstract

The following reviews are intended to help take some of the mystery and terror out of selecting guides to edible fungi for the amateur. The books chosen for review are all in print; several have been available for seventy years. Mushrooming has been of interest to humans since the beginning of time. Lately, however, this interest has increased as more people become interested in all types of foraging. This increased interest is part of our national interest in the out‐of‐doors.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

George Atkinson

Outlines the implications of the EC Directive on ConstructionProducts brought into operation in June 1981, with special attention toits implications for design…

Abstract

Outlines the implications of the EC Directive on Construction Products brought into operation in June 1981, with special attention to its implications for design practitioners. Refers to essential requirements for safety, health, etc., the status of Eurocodes, European Standards and the EC Conformity Mark, European Technical Approvals and the effects of different national traditions in building regulation. Discusses the short‐and‐long term implications for those working in the private sector and on public work.

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Structural Survey, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1907

SO much controversy has raged around the subject of newsrooms in the past two years, that librarians are, as a rule, utterly tired of it, and the appearance of still…

Abstract

SO much controversy has raged around the subject of newsrooms in the past two years, that librarians are, as a rule, utterly tired of it, and the appearance of still another article upon the subject is not calculated to tone down the general spirit of vexation. It requires no little courage to appear in the arena in this year of Grace, openly championing those departments of our institutions which were originally intended to convey the news of the day in the broadest manner.

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New Library World, vol. 9 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

G. Atkinson

Introduction The Single Market Programme, to which the UK Government is committed through the Single European Act, aims to establish a true ‘common’ market for products…

Abstract

Introduction The Single Market Programme, to which the UK Government is committed through the Single European Act, aims to establish a true ‘common’ market for products and services within the European Community by 31st December, 1992. For construction it embraces the opening up of public contracts — extended to include local authorities and state industries and the removal of technical barriers to trade in building products and the supply of professional services.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1901

The question has been recently raised as to how far the operation of the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts of 1875, 1879, and 1899, and the Margarine Act, 1887, is affected by…

Abstract

The question has been recently raised as to how far the operation of the Sale of Food and Drugs Acts of 1875, 1879, and 1899, and the Margarine Act, 1887, is affected by the Act 29 Charles II., cap. 7, “for the better observation of the Lord's Day, commonly called Sunday.” At first sight it would seem a palpable absurdity to suppose that a man could escape the penalties of one offence because he has committed another breach of the law at the same time, and in this respect law and common‐sense are, broadly speaking, in agreement; yet there are one or two cases in which at least some show of argument can be brought forward in favour of the opposite contention.

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British Food Journal, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Kerry D. Vandell

This paper aims to trace the evolution of the theory and practice of valuation of real estate interests. Using a historical perspective, especially in the context of…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to trace the evolution of the theory and practice of valuation of real estate interests. Using a historical perspective, especially in the context of recent events, it identifies an emerging unification of thought and application that has important implications for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies and synthesizes the contributory literature to the philosophical underpinnings of value theory and practice as applied to real estate. From pre‐history to the present, it traces classical concepts and the way these are related to the recent innovations in economic and financial valuation theory.

Findings

Recent contributions to value theory hold the promise of unifying and transforming the practice of real estate appraisal to one that is state‐of‐the‐art in terms of its contemporary relevance. However, numerous issues remain as obstacles, including insufficient recognition of the “real” nature (as opposed to “capital” nature) of real estate; a lag in educational standards to bring the profession up to date; an excessive reliance on models and data rather than judgment and common sense; and “silo‐ization” of specialties. Promising directions for future research are identified.

Originality/value

The task of valuation of interests in real property has taken on an increasingly important role, as the market for real estate has grown and become more liquid and complete. This paper provides a perspective on where it has come from and where it must go in the future in terms necessary changes in theory and practice to remain viable and relevant.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1934

THE most important personal news of the month is the appointment of Mr. J. D. Cowley M.A., the County Librarian of Lancashire, as Director of the University of London…

Abstract

THE most important personal news of the month is the appointment of Mr. J. D. Cowley M.A., the County Librarian of Lancashire, as Director of the University of London School of Librarianship. This had been expected for some considerable time, but we were unable to comment until it had been confirmed in the middle of May by the Senate of the University. Mr. Cowley will bring to the office the culture which we know him to possess, experience in the library of a learned society, and the much wider public experience which he has gained in Lancashire. A quiet enthusiast, with a sympathetic and friendly manner, his achievements in librarianship have already been such as to make our hopes for his future most sanguine. We all like him, which is one of the best foundations for his success. The Library Association Record has expressed the general hope that he will be able to make such arrangements in the School that its students may be more acceptable than they have been hitherto in public libraries. One of the methods by which this can be accomplished is extremely simple in statement, although it may be somewhat difficult of realisation. The larger libraries should be induced to recruit their assistants in the ordinary manner, to retain them on the staff for two years with ample opportunities for gaining practical experience in more than merely mechanical operations, and should then send the best of them for two years to the School of Librarianship. During their absence the libraries would of course recruit other assistants to supply their place, who in turn, if satisfactory, should be sent to the School of Librarian‐ship, and those who have been at the School should return in their places. There would, of course, have to be two vacancies to start from, but in a large system that is a very small matter. In the way suggested the libraries would be acquiring staffs which were practically trained in the first place and would understand everything that was being taught at the School, and who, in addition, would have university training and the status which undoubtedly belongs to that. If it could only be made clear to the assistant librarians of the present day that university school pupils would not displace them, we think one of the objections to the School would have passed. At present, of course, the objection is deeper; it is the chief librarian who seems to avoid the school diplomate. On the other hand, there is the suggestion that anyone who has passed through the School is ipso facto a librarian and should have a high position; that, of course, is not so. Ultimately he may have, but school training is only preliminary to library experience, and more is required before a librarian can have a responsible post in a library of any consequence. We hope the point we have raised will have the consideration which we believe it deserves.

Details

New Library World, vol. 36 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

John Dorchester

This paper seeks to consider a significant market misconception and related errors commonly made by valuers, financial decision makers, and other users of valuation…

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5799

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to consider a significant market misconception and related errors commonly made by valuers, financial decision makers, and other users of valuation services. Its purpose is to focus on the importance of relating the explicit requirements of market value and fair value definitions to the evidence required for a supportable opinion of either.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides conceptual foundations for the terms “market value” and “fair value” and reviews their meanings and applications in a historical context. Business cycles and the recent recession are used as foundations for illustrating how prices, such as for real estate, vary with cycles, but are not always directly indicative of either market value or fair value. The latter term has a long history, but has undergone recent definition and revision by the US Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) that are shown to closely align fair value with market value. A current controversy over the use of transactions as prima fascie, or perhaps the only indication of market value is discussed and the “market” of “market value” is examined.

Findings

The paper offers a new look at market evidence concepts that are time‐honored, yet have been largely lost or forgotten. The principal finding is that duress is not consistent with conventional definitions of market value or fair value, yet significant market evidence exists that duress is often ignored or improperly considered in valuations and financial decisions. The paper also concludes that the FASB's focus on “market participants” (sellers and buyers) as the prime source of Fair Value evidence is akin to the rules which have applied to market value for many decades. The paper concludes with a discussion of why transactions may be evidence of “a market,” but are not necessarily representative of the “market” or of fair value.

Originality/value

Market Value is a market protection against fraud, misrepresentation, and misunderstanding. Valuations must be performed in accordance with that definition – not as it is interpreted for personal gain or for any other interpretations of convenience, misunderstanding, or special purpose.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 29 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

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