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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

George A. Zsidisin, Boyana Petkova, Lance W. Saunders and Mark Bisseling

The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for identifying and managing supply quality risk (SQR).

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1625

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for identifying and managing supply quality risk (SQR).

Design/methodology/approach

The research method began with a literature study to form a grounded model of how organizations identify and perceive SQR and associate various supplier quality management practices (SQMPs) with SQR sources. The second phase consisted of structured interviews at three companies in the food machinery industry in order to refine these concepts and examine causal relationships.

Findings

The findings from this study indicate that firms may be more likely to implement integrative supply chain practices when supplier or component sources of SQR are considered to be a significant threat. Conversely, market sources of SQR were generally not perceived as being significant, and therefore do not warrant as much direct intervention in their management.

Research limitations/implications

Most previous studies on supply chain risk focus on delivery disruptions. However, there is a lack of knowledge on identifying, assessing, and managing supply risk associated with quality. By addressing these issues and outlining future research directions the authors help provide a starting point for contributing to this line of study in supply risk theory and practice.

Practical implications

The framework developed in this paper can aid supply chain professionals in understanding what constitutes SQR and providing insight to approaches for managing this form of supply risk.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study that the authors are aware of that links various sources of SQR to specific SQMPs.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 October 2020

Barbara Gaudenzi, George A. Zsidisin and Roberta Pellegrino

Firms can choose from an array of approaches for reducing the detrimental financial effects caused by unfavorable fluctuations in commodity prices. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Firms can choose from an array of approaches for reducing the detrimental financial effects caused by unfavorable fluctuations in commodity prices. The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance for effectively estimating the financial effects of mitigating commodity price risk volatility (CPV) in supply chain management decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts two prominent and complementary methodologies, namely, total cost of ownership (TCO and real options valuation (ROV), to illustrate how commodity price risk mitigation strategies can be analyzed with respect to their effect on costs and performance. The paper provides insights through a case study to demonstrate the application of these methods together and establish the benefits and challenges associated with their implementation.

Findings

The paper illustrates advantages and disadvantages of TCO and ROV and how these approaches can be adopted together to contribute to effective purchasing decisions. Supply chain flexibility is a key capability but requires investments. Holistically measuring the financial effects of flexibility investments is imperative for gaining executive management support in mitigating commodity price volatility.

Research limitations/implications

This study can provide supply chain professionals with useful guidance for measuring the costs and benefits related to developing strategies for mitigating commodity price volatility. TCO provides a focus on the costs associated with the commodity purchasing process, and ROV enables the aggregation of all the costs and benefits associated with the use of the strategy and synthesizes them into the net value estimate.

Originality/value

The paper provides a comparison of different but complementary approaches, specifically TCO and ROV, for analyzing the effectiveness of CPV risk mitigation decisions. In addition, these two methods allow supply chain professionals to evaluate and control the financial effects of CPV risk, particularly the impact of mitigation on firm’s cash flows.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 January 2020

George A. Zsidisin, Amanda Bresler, Ben Hazen, Keith F. Snider and Taylor H. Wilkerson

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight on high-interest areas of research in defense-related logistics and supply chain management and opportunities for advancing…

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1284

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight on high-interest areas of research in defense-related logistics and supply chain management and opportunities for advancing theory and practice in this domain.

Design/methodology/approach

A panel of experts provided their insight to several questions oriented toward examining research opportunities and gaps in defense logistics research at the 2018 Academic Research Symposium of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals annual conference on September 30, 2018.

Findings

Three overarching themes emerged from the panel discussion for advancing theory and practice in defense logistics and supply chain management, which are developing a central repository, creating publication opportunities and integrating research practice and knowledge with the greater academic community.

Originality/value

Logistics and supply chain research is critical for advancing knowledge and practice in the military, as well as industrial settings. The intention in this manuscript is to provide scholars and practitioners in both settings greater awareness and potential avenues for developing synergies and processes for advancing logistics and supply chain research.

Details

Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-6439

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

George A. Zsidisin, Alex Panelli and Rebecca Upton

Purchasing organizations use various strategies and techniques to minimize the chance and impact of detrimental events occurring in the supply base. Supply risk…

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12927

Abstract

Purchasing organizations use various strategies and techniques to minimize the chance and impact of detrimental events occurring in the supply base. Supply risk assessments are a necessary first step in managing those risks. An analysis of in‐depth interviews with purchasing professionals from nine companies indicates that purchasing organizations often create contingency plans, and implement process‐improvement and buffer strategies in response to perceived supply risks discovered in assessments. Even though risk assessments, contingency plans, and risk management efforts are generally acknowledged as being important, many of those interviewed believed that there was not enough done in their organizations to mitigate supply‐related risks.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2013

George A. Zsidisin, Janet L. Hartley and Wesley A. Collins

In this article, the authors aim to describe an approach used in a purchasing/supply management course at their university that provides students with a realistic…

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1146

Abstract

Purpose

In this article, the authors aim to describe an approach used in a purchasing/supply management course at their university that provides students with a realistic, problem‐based learning experience with client involvement while maintaining consistent learning outcomes and a manageable faculty workload term after term. Students use a standardized approach to assess commodity price risk and decide upon an effective risk management strategy. The specific commodity that students analyze is selected by client companies who then actively participate in the course.

Design/methodology/approach

An illustrative case is presented describing how universities can partner with companies to integrate student projects into the curriculum using a standardized, repeatable process.

Findings

There are numerous benefits obtained for students, faculty, universities, and companies when engaging in commodity price analysis and risk management projects. These include the applied learning for students, providing new insights to companies, networking opportunities for students and companies that may lead to hiring, fostering closer relationships between universities and companies, providing research contacts and opportunities, and ensuring that the course is repeatable each semester.

Originality/value

The authors' approach capitalizes on the realism of client involvement while reducing the variation in learning outcomes and increased workload introduced by doing different types of client‐based company projects each term.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1998

George A. Zsidisin and Thomas E. Hendrick

Purchasing and supply chain management have a critical role, and significant influence, in a firm’s environmental performance. This study explores the extent of…

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2540

Abstract

Purchasing and supply chain management have a critical role, and significant influence, in a firm’s environmental performance. This study explores the extent of involvement that purchasing managers in Germany, the UK, and the USA have in environmental issues, versus the level they believe they should have. The environmental issues addressed in this paper are: hazardous materials, investment recovery, product design, and supply chain relationships. Overall findings suggest that purchasing managers want greater levels of participation in these environmental issues. The study also describes differences according to country. Future research is suggested to explore how purchasing managers can influence the supply chain to improve corporate environmental performance.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 98 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

George A. Zsidisin, Lisa M. Ellram, Joseph R. Carter and Joseph L. Cavinato

Purchasing organizations are exposed to risk in their interactions with suppliers, whether it is recognized and managed, addressed in a cursory manner, or altogether…

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18772

Abstract

Purchasing organizations are exposed to risk in their interactions with suppliers, whether it is recognized and managed, addressed in a cursory manner, or altogether ignored. In order to understand the supply risk that exists, purchasing organizations can proactively assess the probability and impact of supply risk in advance, or reactively discover risk after a detrimental event occurs. The purpose of this study is to explore, analyze, and derive common themes on supply risk assessment techniques. Findings from this research indicate that purchasing organizations can assess supply risk with techniques that focus on addressing supplier quality issues, improving supplier processes, and reducing the likelihood of supply disruptions. From an agency theory perspective, these risk assessment techniques facilitate the obtaining of information by purchasing organizations to verify supplier behaviors, promoting goal congruence between buying and selling firms, and reducing outcome uncertainty associated with inbound supply.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Steven A. Melnyk, Roger J. Calantone, Joan Luft, Douglas M. Stewart, George A. Zsidisin, John Hanson and Laird Burns

To understand the use of metrics to attain alignment between the needs of the customer, strategic objectives, and the execution system. This paper examines the process by…

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3440

Abstract

Purpose

To understand the use of metrics to attain alignment between the needs of the customer, strategic objectives, and the execution system. This paper examines the process by which metrics at the various levels are developed and the factors affecting this process.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on a series of “deep” case studies and 45 interviews of key managers at various levels within three related businesses. Open and axial coding on the data was performed and themes reported.

Findings

The findings show how metrics can generate two types of synergy, financial, and strategic and that numerous factors affect metrics deployment and alignment. There also exists a tension between those metrics that encourage sales growth through innovation and market development (i.e. the so‐called top line metrics) and those metrics that reduce costs or asset investments (i.e. bottom line metrics).

Research limitations/implications

Selective coding of the data to develop theoretical insight has yet to be performed.

Practical implications

Alignment is affected by both the goals used and the processes used in developing and implementing metrics. Furthermore, the study shows that those actions that foster cost reduction (e.g. through lean systems) may unintentionally hinder and limit those actions aimed at encouraging innovation.

Originality/value

The metrics alignment process is vital to effective management, yet the mechanisms of this process leading from understanding of the customer goals appropriate metrics for the execution system is effectively unexplored – a shortcoming that this paper begins to rectify.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 54 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

George A. Zsidisin, Minjoon Jun and Laural L. Adams

Providing high levels of service quality to customers has become a necessity for companies to remain competitive in the marketplace. This paper reports the findings from a

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2926

Abstract

Providing high levels of service quality to customers has become a necessity for companies to remain competitive in the marketplace. This paper reports the findings from a case study of a language school agency. As a “communication channel intermediary”, the case study firm provides a high quality service to customers located upstream (Spanish immersion schools), as well as downstream (students) in its supply chain. The key determinant of service quality that both of these groups use in evaluating customer service is the communication of accurate and timely information. Service quality provided to student customers is primarily facilitated through the use of the Internet, while Spanish immersion school customers rely on telephone communication, e‐mail, and in‐person visits. Implications for this dual‐direction customer focus and the use of the Internet in the service transaction are presented.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

George A. Zsidisin and Lisa M. Ellram

Many firms have experienced significant benefits from engaging in supplier alliances. However, alliance relationships do not evolve in isolation. Support factors for…

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5889

Abstract

Many firms have experienced significant benefits from engaging in supplier alliances. However, alliance relationships do not evolve in isolation. Support factors for supplier alliances include purchasing’s accountability for their actions, the use of information technology, the perceived importance of the purchasing and supply management (PSM) function, and the degree of participation in strategic purchasing activities. In addition, PSM engages in cost and price‐related activities associated with supplier alliances, including total cost of ownership, understanding specific supplier costs, target costing, and market monitoring. Empirical results from a survey indicate that significant relationships exist between support factors, cost and price activities, and supplier alliance involvement by the PSM function. The exploratory findings suggest that support factors must be in place and continually improved to facilitate purchasing’s involvement in alliances. PSM involvement in cost and price activities is also strongly related to supplier alliance participation. For purchasing firms to obtain long‐term benefits from alliances with suppliers, purchasing professionals must continually provide valuable input into these relationships through their corporate influence, use of information technology, and participation in various proactive purchasing activities.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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