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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

George (Yiorgos) Allayannis and Christopher Brandriff

This case examines the causes and consequences of the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy during one of the most fascinating weekends in financial history. It's about the…

Abstract

This case examines the causes and consequences of the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy during one of the most fascinating weekends in financial history. It's about the commercial paper market, a major funding market served by Lehman Brothers, and the events that led to “breaking the buck” on money market funds. It also examines the CDS market where Lehman was such a big player, the potential impact that CDSs had on the crisis, and the notion and validity of the too-big-to-fail hypothesis.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Kenneth M. Eades, George (Yiorgos) Allayannis and Minas Terlidis

The case examines one of the most significant infrastructure projects in southeastern Europe during a time when the legal and financial environment for project financing…

Abstract

The case examines one of the most significant infrastructure projects in southeastern Europe during a time when the legal and financial environment for project financing was in its infancy (early to mid-1990s). Athens needed a ring road to support its bid to host the 2004 Olympic Games. The road was technically—as well as logistically—complex, involving 33 municipalities and construction that involved a major metropolitan area (Athens) populated by more than 3.5 million inhabitants. The case examines the economics of the project, how private-public partnerships (PPPs) are structured, and the broader field of infrastructure finance.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

George (Yiorgos) Allayannis

This case invites students to evaluate, based on given materials, the causes, consequences, and potential resolutions of the financial crisis of 2007–2009. The premise of…

Abstract

This case invites students to evaluate, based on given materials, the causes, consequences, and potential resolutions of the financial crisis of 2007–2009. The premise of a business professor preparing a slide presentation dramatizes an analysis of the financial crisis. Reviewing his data, much of it in graph form, the professor ponders the central role of banks and the impact of risk management, leverage, and incentives. His main thesis is that the fundamental issue surrounding this crisis was the misjudgment of the risks taken, with the result that risk management failed to do its job of curtailing and managing risk as expected.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

George (Yiorgos) Allayannis and Adam Risell

In October, the CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co., is preparing for the company's 2010 Q3 earnings conference call and wondering how to address the inevitable questions related…

Abstract

In October, the CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co., is preparing for the company's 2010 Q3 earnings conference call and wondering how to address the inevitable questions related to financial reform. It has been just over two months since the Dodd-Frank Financial Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act) had been passed, and there was still much uncertainty as to how JPMorgan should address the reforms. JPMorgan had reported stronger than expected EPS in the third quarter, but analysts were more concerned about what strategic initiatives the CEO would implement in response to the Dodd-Frank Act. The act had introduced wide-ranging and industry-changing reforms that were aimed primarily at fully integrated financial institutions such as JPMorgan. While most of the rulemaking would be forthcoming from regulatory authorities, the CEO knew it would be best to address these issues immediately to protect shareholders by avoiding uncertainty.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

George (Yiorgos) Allayannis

In January 2008, Citi and Merrill Lynch are trying to steer their ships back to calm waters. The new CEOs, Vikram Pandit (Citi) and John Thain (Merrill), have been at the…

Abstract

In January 2008, Citi and Merrill Lynch are trying to steer their ships back to calm waters. The new CEOs, Vikram Pandit (Citi) and John Thain (Merrill), have been at the helm of their companies for less than three months. This case focuses on their steps to counteract the massive losses resulting from their firms' investments in subprime-mortgage structures. What actions have these leaders taken thus far and what actions should they consider going forward? See also “Warren E. Buffett, 2008” (UVA-F-1550).

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

George (Yiorgos) Allayannis and Baijnath Ramraika

In early September 2008, in the midst of the subprime crisis, a manager with the student-run Darden Capital Management fund, wants to evaluate whether Comerica…

Abstract

In early September 2008, in the midst of the subprime crisis, a manager with the student-run Darden Capital Management fund, wants to evaluate whether Comerica Incorporated, a regional bank based in Dallas, Texas, is a good candidate for inclusion in his portfolio. He needs to perform a valuation of the bank to assert whether the bank seems to be undervalued by the market or whether a further decline in value might be possible. He must account for all the factors that affect bank valuation, both as related to the bank itself as well as to the current market conditions. The case can be taught to: a) examine the valuation of a bank during turbulent times; b) understand the key accounting statements (balance sheet and income statement) for a bank and how they may differ from those for an industrial company; and c) understand the key value drivers of bank value (metrics for profitability, credit quality, liquidity, and capital).

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

George (Yiorgos) Allayannis, Gerry Yemen, Andrew C. Wicks and Matthew Dougherty

This public-sourced case was named the best finance case of 2013 in the 24th annual awards and competition sponsored by The Case Centre. It was designed for and works well…

Abstract

This public-sourced case was named the best finance case of 2013 in the 24th annual awards and competition sponsored by The Case Centre. It was designed for and works well in the latter portion of a GEMBA Financial Management and Policies course and in the early stage of a second-year MBA elective Financial Institutions and Markets course. The case is set in mid-2012 as the new co-CEOs of Deutsche Bank are about to speak in an analyst call. Students are the decision makers and have the opportunity to evaluate the various factors affecting a bank's situation in a changing global industry, such as leverage and credit quality, as well as to discuss the implications on Deutsche Bank and the banking sector more broadly of Basel III, the global regulatory reform. The students also have the opportunity to conduct a valuation of the bank. Investors were anxious to know whether the new co-CEOs would discuss the strategy of how Deutsche Bank planned to meet the new regulatory requirements, what effect Basel III would have on the company's profitability, and what lines of business it would focus on going forward in a new banking environment. They also wanted to know more about the benefits of the 2010 majority stake investment in Postbank, a German commercial bank. In class, this discussion also allows for a broader examination of the universal bank model and the role of banks within society.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

George (Yiorgos) Allayannis

In January 2008, in the midst of the subprime-mortgage crisis, Warren Buffett is looking for good investment opportunities for his almost $50 billion in cash. As usual, he…

Abstract

In January 2008, in the midst of the subprime-mortgage crisis, Warren Buffett is looking for good investment opportunities for his almost $50 billion in cash. As usual, he has been patient and careful in identifying the right opportunities; however, the amount of cash in his company has grown considerably, and with so much cash sitting idle, returns could suffer. This case can be used to pursue several objectives: (1) to showcase Warren Buffett's leadership in the financial markets; (2) to understand his principles and the principles of value investing more broadly; (3) to understand Warren Buffett as both a thinker and a leader in the world of investing and as an agent of stability in a world of capital markets characterized by continuous change; (4) to discuss Buffett's investment decisions (Swiss Re, Burlington Northern, the funding of his own new bond-insurance business, BHAC) and the timing of those decisions in the midst of the subprime crisis and in an environment of increasing energy demand; (5) to discuss his decision not to invest in banks in the current environment as well as his largest investment, the philanthropic Gates Foundation; and (6) to understand some of the new market forces, such as sovereign funds, as providers of capital.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

George (Yiorgos) Allayannis and William Burton

Dick Mayo, one of the most celebrated value investors in America was puzzled by the New Economy's continuous bias toward growth investment strategies. He examines the…

Abstract

Dick Mayo, one of the most celebrated value investors in America was puzzled by the New Economy's continuous bias toward growth investment strategies. He examines the basics of his philosophy versus that of a growth orientation by evaluating the long-term expected returns of several value and growth stocks. This case can be used to pursue several objectives: (1) to define value and growth investing-where the differences lie and whether one approach is superior to the other or whether both have merit; and (2) to discuss issues related to consistency of one's investment philosophy. Should one stay true to one's philosophy even when the market seems to run counter to it for a prolonged period of time? Can value investing deliver value in this New Economy or is it only an Old Economy concept? The students are instructed to perform basic valuations of Cisco Systems (a growth company), CVS, R.R. Donnelley, and Manor Care (value companies) and compute their long-term expected returns. The case comes with an Excel spreadsheet containing the data and relevant valuation ratios for the above firms. The valuations are straightforward, but they tell an interesting story: the expected returns of glamorous stocks in reality may not be so glamorous.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

George (Yiorgos) Allayannis and Rachel Loeffler

In mid-January 2008, Merrill Lynch announced a $6.6 billion mandatory convertible-preferred share issuance, much of which was placed privately with the Kuwait Investment…

Abstract

In mid-January 2008, Merrill Lynch announced a $6.6 billion mandatory convertible-preferred share issuance, much of which was placed privately with the Kuwait Investment Authority (KIA), the Korean Investment Corporation (KIC), and the Mizuho Corporate Bank. The case is set during the subprime-mortgage crisis, which plagued banks and depleted their capital. It focuses on the decision of John Thain to issue capital and place it with sovereign wealth funds (SWFs) in an effort to stabilize the company and put it on the road to growth and profitability again. The case describes the various types and origins of SWFs, their orientation, and their recent intensive investment activity in the global financial-services sector. The case also discusses the transparency of SWFs and their role in the global financial system as liquidity-providing long-term players. Finally, Merrill Lynch's decision to issue the specific financial instrument to replenish its capital (mandatory convertible-preferred) and its terms are analyzed.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

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