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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Rachid Zeffane and Geoffrey Mayo

In recent years, organisations around the world have been seriously affected by a range of economic, political and social upheavals that have gathered momentum in most…

Abstract

In recent years, organisations around the world have been seriously affected by a range of economic, political and social upheavals that have gathered momentum in most parts of the globe. The viability of the conventional (pyramidal) organisational structures is being challenged in conjunction with major shifts in the roles of mid and top managers. In many countries, the pace of the above socio‐economic events and uncertainties is happening at an unprecedented pace. Some markets are showing signs of potential gigantic expansions while others (historically prosperous) are on the verge of complete collapse (Dent, 1991). In responding to the socio‐economic challenges of the nineties, organisations (across the board) have resorted to dismantling the conventional pyramidal structure and adopting so‐called “leaner” structures (see Zeffane, 1992). The most common struggle has been to maintain market share in an economic environment increasingly characterised by excess labour supply (Bamber, 1990; Green & Macdonald, 1991). As organisations shifted their strategies from “mass production” to “post‐fordism” (see, for example Kern and Schumann, 1987), there has been a significant tendency to emphasise flexibility of both capital and labour in order to cater for the niche markets which are claimed to be rapidly emerging, world‐wide. This has resulted in massive organisational restructuring world‐wide.

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International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 14 no. 3/4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Rachid Zeffane and Geoffrey Mayo

Argues that, before rightsizing is considered, human resource managementmust establish the appropriate human resource plan to give theorganization the edge it needs to…

Abstract

Argues that, before rightsizing is considered, human resource management must establish the appropriate human resource plan to give the organization the edge it needs to minimize the upheaval caused by rightsizing and to remain competitive. Rightsizing is inevitably accompanied by changes in the fundamental relationship between the organization and its workforce. Strategic human resource managers of today must comprehend valuable lessons from the past recessional times to remain organizationally lean and to cultivate resolutions to employee problems that are more creative than cash payoffs. Whatever the situation, staff reduction is always difficult, especially in industries where stability and security of employment has been the custom. To survive, managers must not ignore the important factors relating to people management. To deal with these issues managers should avoid certain actions when corporate restructuring becomes necessary. For example, unrealistic promises should not be made and action should not be postponed in anticipation of improvements in the environment. To help with motivating the remaining employees, managers also need to know precisely what the new corporate strategy actually entails and why the changes are being made. A truthful and constant flow of information from top management can minimize the damage that could be caused by rumours and allow employees to concentrate on their main tasks. A major function of human resource management during transitional organizational movement is to support and advise managers in order to reduce complications and disturbances to the organization.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 32 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Rachid M. Zeffane and Geoffrey Mayo

In the 1990s, a number of emerging issues are posing serious challengesto the staffing function in both public and private sectororganizations. Discusses these issues and…

Abstract

In the 1990s, a number of emerging issues are posing serious challenges to the staffing function in both public and private sector organizations. Discusses these issues and their implications on career trends and staffing strategies. In particular, examines and discusses the various staffing and career challenges posed by workforce diversity, the increasing entry of women in the workforce, the increasing demand on education and training, the increasing importance of equal opportunity and age discrimination legislation and the changing pattern in employee aspirations and attitudes. Also presents the way in which organizations in the 1990s are responding to the above challenges. Also outlines and discusses a number of suggestions relating to more effective career and staffing strategies to deal with the above challenges.

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International Journal of Career Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

Rachid Zeffane and Geoffrey Mayo

Today, human resource managers do not have the luxury of operating andperforming in a stable, predictable environment as political, social andeconomic changes are…

Abstract

Today, human resource managers do not have the luxury of operating and performing in a stable, predictable environment as political, social and economic changes are affecting all organizations and their human resource management activities. In particular, the dominant environmental uncertainties combined with recent trends/changes in the socio‐economic climate are having considerable effects on the place and role of human resource planning (HRP). Outlines some of the major issues surrounding the HRP function in the face of the above uncertainties and changes. An operational HRP model designed to incorporate these is proposed and outlined. Suggestions for implementing the model by means of simple spreadsheets or a basic (object oriented) computerized decision support system are also made. A preliminary computerized decision support system, based on the proposed model, can easily be developed. This would prove of great assistance to human resource managers, planners and professionals in the challenging task of personnel planning in the 1990s. Also outlines the various scenarios and procedures required in building the operational model.

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International Journal of Manpower, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Book part
Publication date: 18 February 2004

Warren J Samuels

Prior to the first session I was asked about my view of rent seeking, mentioned in passing in the document of mine distributed earlier. I replied that my view had three…

Abstract

Prior to the first session I was asked about my view of rent seeking, mentioned in passing in the document of mine distributed earlier. I replied that my view had three parts. First, I agreed that rent seeking, however defined, was ubiquitous. Second, I argued that rent seeking is not bad per se. Third, I argued that I found particularly disgraceful treatments of the allocation of resources to efforts to change the law as bad rent seeking. Both this person and Jim Buchanan (later in the conference) insisted that rent seeking was objectionable when it involved a transfer without a gain in efficiency, i.e. the creation of something productive. I responded that this view substituted the analyst’s definition of productive for that of the economic agent – who obviously believed that hiring a lawyer, etc. to help bring about a potential change in the law was a desirable, hence productive, use of his or her resources. I further insisted that this definition, especially when it was used in a blanket, indiscriminate way, functioned to privilege existing law and those benefiting from existing law and to deny people access to their government, and that it did so by manipulating the definition of rent seeking to give effect to selective antecedent normative premises hidden within the use of the term “productive” (in at least one discussion the term “artificial” was used). I pointed to this as a problem in the use of language. Further aspects of the terminology of rent seeking will be dealt with below.

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A Research Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-089-0

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Caroyln Garrity, Eric W. Liguori and Jeff Muldoon

This paper aims to offer a critical biography of Joan Woodward, often considered the founder of contingency theory. This paper examines Woodward’s background to develop a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer a critical biography of Joan Woodward, often considered the founder of contingency theory. This paper examines Woodward’s background to develop a more complete understanding of the factors that influenced her work.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on insights gained from personal correspondence with two colleagues of Woodward, one who recruited her to the Imperial College where she conducted her most prominent work and one whom she recruited while at the college. In addition, Woodward’s original work, academic literature, published remembrances and a plethora of other secondary sources are reviewed.

Findings

By connecting these otherwise disparate sources of information, a more complete understanding of Woodward’s work and its context is provided. It is argued that Woodward’s education, training, brilliance, values, the relative weakness of British sociology and the need to improve the economy helped to make Woodward’s work both original and practical.

Originality/value

The originality of this work is to examine the work of Woodward through the lens of critical biography. Despite Woodward’s contributions, Woodward remains an underappreciated figure. The purpose is to provide her contribution against the backdrop of the British industrial and educational sphere.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

R.G.B. Fyffe

This book is a policy proposal aimed at the democratic left. It is concerned with gradual but radical reform of the socio‐economic system. An integrated policy of…

Abstract

This book is a policy proposal aimed at the democratic left. It is concerned with gradual but radical reform of the socio‐economic system. An integrated policy of industrial and economic democracy, which centres around the establishment of a new sector of employee‐controlled enterprises, is presented. The proposal would retain the mix‐ed economy, but transform it into a much better “mixture”, with increased employee‐power in all sectors. While there is much of enduring value in our liberal western way of life, gross inequalities of wealth and power persist in our society.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 3 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1951

IN the nature of things the Library Association Conference this year cannot have the spectacular character of the jubilee one of 1950; but that does not mean it will be…

Abstract

IN the nature of things the Library Association Conference this year cannot have the spectacular character of the jubilee one of 1950; but that does not mean it will be less effective or less useful. Edinburgh is the second city of the United Kingdom, at least in appeal to bookmen, and probably Scots would object to our order of the hierarchy. Apart from the public libraries, a place that has the National Library of Scotland, the Advocates, the Signet and the University libraries, to name only the principal ones, with many associations and treasures, must have great attractions. On looking over conference reports generally, one can infer that the one institution in a town that is not frequented by librarians in the week is the public library. The obstacle is no doubt occupation with the meetings, which many delegates are naturally unwilling to miss. But we do suggest that library visits by newcomers to Edinburgh might be quite as important, in present impression and lasting effect, as most ordinary meetings can be. Since it must be admitted that our business at Edinburgh is to attend meetings, restraint is essential, but at least the Central Library and the fine Leith Library should be squeezed into the personal programme.

Details

New Library World, vol. 53 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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