Search results

1 – 10 of 11
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Neil Crosby, Geoffrey Keogh and Geraldine Rees

Examines the methodological issues that arise in generatingstandardised transaction data for use in analysing the determinants ofretail rents. Looks at the issues raised…

Abstract

Examines the methodological issues that arise in generating standardised transaction data for use in analysing the determinants of retail rents. Looks at the issues raised by the use of comparative information and the existence of widely accepted conventions for adjusting comparative evidence to allow for the specific physical and legal characteristics of individual properties. Concludes by questioning the need to test valuation convention against market evidence and the notion of open market value is reassessed.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Geoffrey Keogh

Examines the development of the Spanish non‐residential property market over the last 20 years and in particular since the Boyer reform of 1985. Explores the legal…

Abstract

Examines the development of the Spanish non‐residential property market over the last 20 years and in particular since the Boyer reform of 1985. Explores the legal framework of property interests to demonstrate that the legal prerequisites of a mature market form are now in place. Places legal change in the context of economic pressures for the creation of a modern property investment market. Considers the professional support for transacting property and the nature of the urban planning regime as factors which constrain and mould property market activity, but which may ultimately be transformed by it. Presents market data which show that the Spanish market has experienced one turn of the property cycle in its modern form. Demonstrates that it has proved highly susceptible to extremes of under‐ and over‐supply, arguably owing to the combined influence of an extremely open market and underdeveloped information provision.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Geoffrey Keogh

Outlines a simple analytical framework for interpreting property marketbehaviour across use, investment and development markets and reviewsevidence on market activity over…

Abstract

Outlines a simple analytical framework for interpreting property market behaviour across use, investment and development markets and reviews evidence on market activity over the period 1970‐1994. A simple model of rational switching within investment markets appears to be supported by market evidence from the 1970s. However, the 1980s does not support such simple hypotheses and raises questions about the basis of property market behaviour, particularly with respect to investment. Have investment decisions been irrational or have we witnessed a necessary and justified realignment of property with respect to other asset classes?

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1930

The Library Association of Ireland issued last month the first number of An Leabharlann, their new official journal. The title, for those of us who do not speak the…

Abstract

The Library Association of Ireland issued last month the first number of An Leabharlann, their new official journal. The title, for those of us who do not speak the language of Erin, means The Library. It is an extremely interesting venture which will be followed by librarians on the mainland with sympathetic curiosity. In particular our readers would be interested in the first of a series of articles by Father Stephen J. Brown, S.J., on Book Selection. The worthy Father lectures on this subject at University College, Dublin, in the Library School. It is mainly concerned with what should not be selected, and deals in vigorous fashion with the menace of much of current published stuff. No doubt Father Brown will follow with something more constructive. Mr. T. E. Gay, Chairman of the Association, discusses the need for a survey of Irish libraries and their resources. We agree that it is necessary. The Net Books Agreement, the Council, Notes from the Provinces, and an article in Erse—which we honestly believe that most of our Irish friends can read—and an excellent broadcast talk on the Library and the Student by Miss Christina Keogh, the accomplished Librarian of the Irish Central Library, make up a quite attractive first number. A list of broadcast talks given by members of the Association is included.

Details

New Library World, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2017

Sarah Ruth Sippel, Geoffrey Lawrence and David Burch

This chapter examines the involvement of finance companies in the purchasing and leasing of Australian farmlands. This is a new global phenomenon as, in past decades…

Abstract

This chapter examines the involvement of finance companies in the purchasing and leasing of Australian farmlands. This is a new global phenomenon as, in past decades, finance companies have lent money to farmers, but have rarely sought to purchase land themselves. We investigate and discuss the activities of the Hancock company – an asset management firm that invested in farmland in northern NSW. Material on the activities of Hancock and other investment firms were obtained from documents on the public record, including newspaper reports. Semi-structured interviews with community members were conducted in the region of NSW where Hancock operated. Australian agriculture is being targeted for investment by companies in the finance industry – as part of a growing ‘financialization’ of farming. While it is financially beneficial for companies to invest, they do not do so in ‘empty spaces’ but in locations where people desire to live in a healthy environment. The Hancock company was criticized by community residents for failing to recognize the concerns of local people in pursuing its farming activities. To date, there have been few studies on the financialization of farming in Australia. By investigating the operations of the Hancock company we identify a number of concerns emerging, at the community level, about an overseas company running Australian-based farms.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1927

WE give space this month to practical library binders to describe their work as they see it. Such an arrangement will commend itself to our readers, we hope, as there is…

Abstract

WE give space this month to practical library binders to describe their work as they see it. Such an arrangement will commend itself to our readers, we hope, as there is no more present question with the librarian, and especially the public librarian. Since the war the quality of book‐papers has been such that binding has become the most formidable item in his annual budget except salaries and new book purchase. The cases in which publishers issue their books used to give about 60 issues before re‐binding was necessary; now they rarely give half that number. Binders have shown considerable ingenuity in discovering new methods of sewing, lining and strengthening, to meet the perishable qualities of the paper. Whether they have succeeded or not librarians may judge. The ideal binding for a reference book is an imperishable one; for a lending library book one that lasts in pleasant complexion just as long as the paper holds together. Anything less or more appears to be uneconomical.

Details

New Library World, vol. 29 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1954

AT the time this appears about ten per cent of the librarians of this country will be studying how best to profit by the Hastings conference at the end of the month. The…

Abstract

AT the time this appears about ten per cent of the librarians of this country will be studying how best to profit by the Hastings conference at the end of the month. The town itself is interesting, the old and new being combined in a quite graciously intriguing manner, and the library service there is worthy of attention. We say that pointedly because the pressure of these meetings is so great that the library of the place, the local example of all librarians stand for, is, by the majority, not even visited. In our October issue we hope to give an impression, at any rate a preliminary one, of the proceedings. From the advance notices, which are all that are as yet available, they are to revolve somewhat loosely round staff, stock, and standards, which can be made to cover the whole of librarianship, so that we need not descant upon its importance or pretend that it presents any original subject. Its treatment we hope will be so, as the most ordinary library topic is an old one, but fresh light upon it is always possible. The speakers appear to be all librarians of relatively small libraries and, as these comprise 75% at least of public libraries, there can be no quarrel with that. The new chairman of the L.A. Education Committee, Mr. W. B. Paton, is to look again at the pressing question of staff recruitment and training; we know he will look with clear eyes at a real problem. The Annual Lecture will be by Sir Ben Bowen Thomas, who is Permanent Secretary of the Welsh Department of the Ministry of Education. There will be the usual section meetings, annual dinner, and exhibition. We may be sure that the Presidential Address will be characteristic of Mr. C. B. Oldman, which means that it will be a scholarly reflection of many or some of his wide range of library interests; and also that, under his guidance, the whole conference will be managed well.

Details

New Library World, vol. 56 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Norazlyn Kamal Basha, Jillian C. Sweeney and Geoffrey Norman Soutar

In recent times, many universities have been pressured to become heavily involved in university branding. The purpose of this paper is to investigate students’ perceptions…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent times, many universities have been pressured to become heavily involved in university branding. The purpose of this paper is to investigate students’ perceptions of different international universities (brands) in terms of important university attributes, including the country in which the university’s main campus is located and educational programs are designed (COD) and the method by which the educational services are distributed internationally (DM).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a conjoint simulation procedure, this paper predicts the impact that university attributes have on Malaysian and Chinese students’ preferences for international universities.

Findings

The results suggest that, although COD and DM are important factors, the extent to which these factors dominate student preference differs significantly across students according to nationality.

Research limitations/implications

The simulation suggests how international universities can improve their branding strategies, and highlights the need to understand students’ preferences when developing marketing strategies.

Originality/value

Past research has compared the importance of university attributes across countries from the perspective of students, but failed to assess this issue in the light of existing university brands (at an institutional or country level). Such knowledge can provide an indication of student preferences and competitive performance, which are of great interest to education marketers. The present study predicts the impact of various university attributes on Malaysian and Chinese students’ preferences for specific international universities (brands) in four different countries, and changes in preference that occur when the style of delivery or course suitability is altered.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 October 2017

Nitha Palakshappa and Suzanne Grant

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concepts of social enterprise (SE) and corporate social responsibility (CSR). Both terms are regarded as pivotal but somewhat…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concepts of social enterprise (SE) and corporate social responsibility (CSR). Both terms are regarded as pivotal but somewhat related when discussed in scholarship. Despite this few attempts have been made to isolate the manner in which they connect.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper the authors attempt to unpack these two terms in order to isolate key areas of overlap in their use and operationalization. In doing so, the authors address the call for work to synthesize the highly fragmented literature.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that, while SE and CSR retain a unique place in the business-society landscape, there is indeed an overlap between the two. The generation of value – social, collaborative, or strategic – appears to be a central theme that connects the two concepts.

Originality/value

The authors offer a detailed discussion of how SE and CSR have contributed to scholarship, and demonstrate that the two terms are indeed interrelated on many levels.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Andrea Sharam, Lyndall Elaine Bryant and Thomas Alves

The purpose of this paper is to identify the financial barriers to the supply of affordable apartments in Australia and examine whether demand aggregation and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the financial barriers to the supply of affordable apartments in Australia and examine whether demand aggregation and “deliberative development” (self-build) can form a new affordable housing “structure of provision”.

Design/methodology/approach

Market design, an offshoot of game theory, is used to analyse the existing apartment development model, with “deliberative development” proposed as an innovative alternative. Semi-structured interviews with residential development financiers are used to evaluate whether deliberative development could obtain the requisite development finance.

Findings

This investigation into the financial barriers of a deliberative development model suggests that, while there are hurdles, these can be addressed if key risks in the exchange process can be mitigated. Hence, affordability can be enhanced by “deliberative development” replacing the existing speculative development model.

Research limitations/implications

Market design is a new innovative theoretical approach to understand the supply of housing, offering practical solutions to affordable apartment supply in Australia.

Originality/value

This research identifies financial barriers to the supply of affordable apartments; introduces theoretical understandings gained from market design as an innovative solution; and provides evidence that a new structure of building provision based on “deliberative development” could become a key means of achieving more affordable and better designed apartments.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

1 – 10 of 11