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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Geoffrey C. Lloyd

Describes the success of the British Gas employee suggestion scheme, championed by the chief executive as the vehicle which has enabled the company’s change process to…

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Abstract

Describes the success of the British Gas employee suggestion scheme, championed by the chief executive as the vehicle which has enabled the company’s change process to take place. Relates how the organizational change in British Gas will allow it to concentrate its activities on any one of a number of distinct business units. Each business unit will also have its own suggestion scheme, appropriate to its needs, values, beliefs, and business objectives. The delayering of the management hierarchy will give fewer levels of reporting within the new structure, with greater responsibility pushed down to field operatives who will report to a first‐line manager. The empowerment of lower‐echelon managers will enable the company to speed up the communication process between the management levels, which is good news for the future design and operation of the company suggestion scheme. Provides advice for companies thinking of implementing similar schemes.

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Empowerment in Organizations, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4891

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Geoffrey C. Lloyd

Contends that as techniques to motivate, empower and reward staff become ever more sophisticated and expensive, one of the most obvious, though overlooked, ways of tapping…

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1099

Abstract

Contends that as techniques to motivate, empower and reward staff become ever more sophisticated and expensive, one of the most obvious, though overlooked, ways of tapping the creativity of employees is the suggestion scheme. A staff suggestion scheme may well be dismissed as a simplistic and outdated vehicle by proponents of modern management methods, but to its owners it can be like a classic model ‐ needing just a little care and attention in order for it to run smoothly and at a very low cost. Proposes that readers should spare some time to consider introducing a suggestion scheme as an entry level initiative and a precursor to more sophisticated, elaborate and costly change management mechanisms.

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Health Manpower Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Nigel Bassett‐Jones and Geoffrey C. Lloyd

This paper seeks to examine the issue of whether Herzberg's two‐factor motivation theory still resonates nearly 50 years after it was first posited. The objective is to…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the issue of whether Herzberg's two‐factor motivation theory still resonates nearly 50 years after it was first posited. The objective is to assess whether or not Herzberg's contentious seminal studies on motivation at work still hold true today.

Design/methodology/approach

The arena in which the theory is investigated is work‐based suggestion schemes, and the question considered is “What motivates employees to contribute ideas?” The paper begins by revisiting the literatures that form the basis of motivation theory and, in particular, the furore surrounding the work of Fredrick Herzberg.

Findings

The results are derived from a survey providing over 3,200 responses. They suggest that money and recognition do not appear to be primary sources of motivation in stimulating employees to contribute ideas. In line with Herzberg's predictions, factors associated with intrinsic satisfaction play a more important part.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that, despite the criticism, Herzberg's two‐factor theory still has utility nearly 50 years after it was first developed.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 24 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

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Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1975

At the passing of the Fair Trading Act, 1973, and the setting up of a Consumer Protection Service with an Office of Fair Trading under a Director‐General, few could have…

Abstract

At the passing of the Fair Trading Act, 1973, and the setting up of a Consumer Protection Service with an Office of Fair Trading under a Director‐General, few could have visualized this comprehensive machinery devised to protect the mainly economic interests of consumers could be used to further the efforts of local enforcement officers and authorities in the field of purity and quality control of food and of food hygiene in particular. This, however, is precisely the effect of a recent initiative under Sect. 34 of the Act, reported elsewhere in the BFJ, taken by the Director‐General in securing from a company operating a large group of restaurants a written undertaking, as prescribed by the Section, that it would improve its standards of hygiene; the company had ten convictions for hygiene contraventions over a period of six years.

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British Food Journal, vol. 77 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1959

THE opening months of the last war were conducted in a very leisurely fashion because the expected disasters had not befallen us. Not until our armies were rescued from…

Abstract

THE opening months of the last war were conducted in a very leisurely fashion because the expected disasters had not befallen us. Not until our armies were rescued from the beaches of Dunkirk did the stark realities of the situation percolate into the public mind. Once the facts were understood the whole country was galvanised into activity.

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Work Study, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Heinrich Bortis

Based on Geoffrey Harcourt's Palgrave volumes, this review article attempts to picture how, in a Cambridge environment, Keynes's fragmentary monetary theory of production…

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Abstract

Based on Geoffrey Harcourt's Palgrave volumes, this review article attempts to picture how, in a Cambridge environment, Keynes's fragmentary monetary theory of production grew organically out of Marshall's equally fragmentary monetary theory of exchange. The dangers associated with Keynes's close links with Marshall are alluded to. Indeed, without taking account of the classical spirit of Sraffa's work, Keynes's monetary theory may quite easily be integrated into the Marshallian‐neoclassical framework of analysis. However, theorising, not literally, but in the spirit of Keynes and Sraffa, within a Ricardian‐Pasinettian framework of vertical integration, opens the way to a Classical‐Keynesian monetary theory of production.

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Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1961

WHEN delivering his Elbourne lecture Sir Geoffrey Vickers related the following incident. ‘As a very inexperienced subaltern in the old war, my company commander once said…

Abstract

WHEN delivering his Elbourne lecture Sir Geoffrey Vickers related the following incident. ‘As a very inexperienced subaltern in the old war, my company commander once said to me: “Vickers, the company will bathe this afternoon. Arrange.” In the Flemish hamlet where we were billeted the only bath of any kind was in the local nunnery. The nuns were charity itself but I couldn't ask them to bathe a hundred men. I reviewed other fluid‐containing objects which might be potential baths—cattle drinking troughs, empty beer barrels—and found practical or ethical objections to them all. At that point I had the misfortune to meet my company commander again and was forced to confess that I had not yet solved my problem. He was annoyed. “Whatever have you been doing all this time?” he said. Then, turning his own mind to the problem, apparently for the first time, he added: “Take the company limbers off their wheels, put the tilts inside and the cookers beside them for the hot water; four baths each four feet square, four men to a bath, do the whole job in an hour. Why don't you use your brains?”’

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Work Study, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Michele Lloyd

Media power plays a role in determining which news is told, who is listened to and how subject matter is treated, resulting in some stories being reported in depth while…

Abstract

Media power plays a role in determining which news is told, who is listened to and how subject matter is treated, resulting in some stories being reported in depth while others remain cursory and opaque. This chapter examines how domestic violence and abuse (DVA) is reported in mainstream and social media encompassing newspapers, television and digital platforms. In the United Kingdom, newspapers have freedom to convey particular views on subjects such as DVA as, unlike radio and television broadcasting, they are not required to be impartial (Reeves, 2015).

The gendered way DVA is represented in the UK media has been a long-standing concern. Previous research into newspaper representations of DVA, including our own (Lloyd & Ramon, 2017), found evidence of victim blaming and sexualising violence against women. This current study assesses whether there is continuity with earlier research regarding how victims of DVA, predominantly women, are portrayed as provoking their own abuse and, in cases of femicide, their characters denigrated by some in the media with impunity (Soothill & Walby, 1991). The chapter examines how certain narratives on DVA are constructed and privileged in sections of the media while others are marginalised or silenced. With the rise in digital media, the chapter analyses the changing patterns of news media consumption in the UK and how social media users are responding to DVA cases reported in the news. Through discourse analysis of language and images, the potential messages projected to media consumers are considered, together with consumer dialogue and interaction articulated via online and social media platforms.

Details

Gendered Domestic Violence and Abuse in Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-781-7

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