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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Yong Han, Zhiqaing Wang, Geoff Sheard and Nada Kakabadse

The purpose of this paper is to critically review the extant western literature on political skill and impression management in human resource management and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically review the extant western literature on political skill and impression management in human resource management and organisational behaviour and applies an inductive approach to explore an equal Chinese concept of office politics in the People’s Republic of China (PRC).

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study conducted in a wide range of Chinese organisational forms, employing an inductive approach based on critical incident technique.

Findings

Data collected from 173 employees supported this model and indicated the existence of 14 clusters of behaviours that characterise political skill, impression management and the overlap between the two. Extending impression management theory, the authors found that individual players’ political skill drives the dynamics of Chinese office politics and may help a subordinate gain a favourable image with superiors and serve as the overlap between individual political skill and impression management from the Chinese perspective.

Originality/value

The authors used a grounded theory approach to report the construct of a Chinese concept of office politics in the PRC, which is much similar to the western concept of political skill in organisation. Compared with western political skill literature, this study found both universal and cultural-specific phenomena on political perspective in Chinese organisations.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Benhua Xu, Feng Xu, Cam Caldwell, Geoff Sheard and Larry Floyd

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of trustworthiness at an organizational level. A comparison of Chinese and US perspectives facilitated the identified…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature of trustworthiness at an organizational level. A comparison of Chinese and US perspectives facilitated the identified insight into the nature of trustworthiness.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is an exploratory study of cross-cultural perceptions of trustworthiness at an organizational level. A survey was administered to business school students, faculty members and industrial managers in a major Chinese city. Usable data collected from 398 respondents was analyzed identifying significant factors characterizing organizational trustworthiness.

Findings

Seven factors were identified that characterize organizational trustworthiness. These factors were significant for both US and Chinese respondents, with procedural fairness considered most important of the identified factors.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to trustworthiness literature at the organizational level. Prior empirical research is based on data collected from US business school students. This is the first reported study based on a comparison of data collected from Chinese and US participants. Identifying the seven significant factors characterizing organizational trustworthiness has practical value to international employers who work with the Chinese students who will become tomorrow’s Chinese employees.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

A.G. Sheard and A.P. Kakabadse

This monograph seeks to summarise the key influences of a role‐based perspective on leadership when making decisions as to how organisational resources can best be deployed.

6606

Abstract

Purpose

This monograph seeks to summarise the key influences of a role‐based perspective on leadership when making decisions as to how organisational resources can best be deployed.

Design/methodology/approach

Application of new frameworks provides insight into the leadership roles executives can adopt when part of formal, informal and temporary groups within the organisation's senior management team and those parts of the organisation for which they are responsible. The methodology adopted is qualitative, focusing on application of previously developed frameworks.

Findings

Adoption of an appropriate leadership role, and the timely switch from one role to another as circumstances change, are found to facilitate improvement in the ability of executives to mobilise organisational resources, and in so doing effectively address those challenges with which the organisation is faced.

Research limitations/implications

A one‐organisation intensive case study of a multinational engineering company engaged in the design, development and manufacture of rotating turbomachinery provides the platform for the research. The research intent is to validate two frameworks in a different organisation of a similar demographic profile to those in which the frameworks were developed. The frameworks will require validating in organisations of different demographic profiles.

Practical implications

The concepts advanced, and implications discussed, provide an insight into the role‐based nature of leadership. The practical steps individual executives can take to develop their ability to adopt different leadership roles are highlighted.

Originality/value

This monograph is an investigation into, and study of the contribution of theory that provides insight into, the process by which executives effectively mobilise organisational resources. This differs from the original contributions to theory, which focused on methodology, data gathering and validation in contrast with the current study that is focused on practical application.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 July 2009

Geoff Sheard

240

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Geoff Sheard, Nada Kakabadse and Andrew Kakabadse

Characteristics of leaders whose behaviour is visceral include taking action based on instinct rather than intellect and exhibiting coarse, base and often negative…

Abstract

Purpose

Characteristics of leaders whose behaviour is visceral include taking action based on instinct rather than intellect and exhibiting coarse, base and often negative emotions. Despite the challenge of precisely defining the nature of visceral behaviour, the purpose of this paper is to provide insight into this less attractive side of boardroom life.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a literature review of the research into the negative behaviour leaders exhibit, the paper highlights four forms of visceral behaviour based on focused and intimate qualitative case studies involving the experiences of those on the receiving end of that behaviour within a boardroom context.

Findings

Based on interviews with an international sample of five chief executive officers (CEOs), plus three subordinates with substantial profit and loss responsibility, the study reveals a distinctly human experience from which no one is exempt. The idiosyncratic nature of the visceral behaviour experienced resulted in each study participant's unique experience. The authors conclude that leaders need to adopt specific measures in order to control and reduce the darker human tendencies.

Research limitations/implications

The experiences of study participants are presented in four case studies, providing insight into their experiences whilst also protecting their identity. The study participants were drawn from a sample of companies operating globally within a single sector of the manufacturing industry. The concepts the authors present require validating in other organisations with different demographic profiles.

Originality/value

The paper presents a model based on two dimensions – choice and level of mastery – that provides the reader with insight into the forms of visceral behaviour to which leaders succumb. Insight enables us to offer managers strategic suggestions to guard against visceral behaviour and assist them in mitigating its worst aspects, in both those with whom they work and themselves.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

A.G. Sheard and A.P. Kakabadse

This study proposes that executives need to be prepared to switch roles and membership of groups in order to fulfil their leadership responsibilities effectively.

2318

Abstract

Purpose

This study proposes that executives need to be prepared to switch roles and membership of groups in order to fulfil their leadership responsibilities effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

A validated framework provides insight into the leadership roles that executives can switch between as they move from one formal, informal or temporary group to the next within the organisation's wider senior management team. The methodology adopted is qualitative, focusing on inquiry‐based learning which enabled the authors to gather data on those aspects of context that relate specifically to the leadership roles executives switch between.

Findings

Changing role is found to facilitate improvement in each executive's decision‐making effectiveness and, over time, in the decision‐making capability of an organisation's wider senior management team.

Research limitations/implications

A one‐organisation intensive case study of a multinational engineering company engaged in the design, development and manufacture of rotating turbomachinery provides the platform for the research. The concepts advanced will require validating in other organisations of both similar and different demographic profiles.

Practical implications

The concepts advanced, and implications discussed, provide an insight into the nature of leadership as a network of relationships. The practical steps individual executives can take to develop their ability to adopt different leadership roles are highlighted.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to assist executives within the wider senior management team to better adapt and coordinate their behaviour with other executives. In so doing, it is suggested that executives contribute more positively to the organisational decision‐making processes and wider senior management team interaction by being adaptive and responsive to changes in their surrounding context.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

349

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

A.G. Sheard, A.P. Kakabadse and N.K. Kakabadse

This study seeks to propose that executives need to be prepared to adopt roles as a mechanism for rotating leadership if those groups of which they are a part are to…

1780

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to propose that executives need to be prepared to adopt roles as a mechanism for rotating leadership if those groups of which they are a part are to perform to their full potential.

Design/methodology/approach

A validated framework provides insight into the leadership roles executives can adopt when part of formal, informal and temporary groups. The methodology adopted is qualitative, focusing on the application of previously developed frameworks.

Findings

Adopting a role is found to enable the rotation of leadership within a group, which in turn facilitates development of the group.

Research limitations/implications

A one‐organisation intensive case study of a multinational engineering company engaged in the design, development and manufacture of rotating turbomachinery provides the platform for the research. The frameworks will require validating in organisations of different demographic profiles.

Practical implications

The concepts advanced and implications discussed provide an insight into the role‐based nature of leadership. The practical steps individual executives can take to adopt a role, and in so doing develop the group of which they are a part, are highlighted.

Originality/value

This paper is an investigation into, and study of, the process by which executives adopt roles as a mechanism for rotating leadership within a group. In so doing, it is suggested that executives contribute more positively to the development of the groups of which they are a part by being more adaptive and responsive to changes in their surrounding context.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 April 2007

A.G. Sheard and A.P. Kakabadse

The research described in this article seeks to address the question of the extent to which a role‐based perspective can provide insight into the distributed and networked…

2123

Abstract

Purpose

The research described in this article seeks to address the question of the extent to which a role‐based perspective can provide insight into the distributed and networked form of leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

A model provides insight into the distributed and networked form of leadership, and the roles that executives can adopt in formal, informal or temporary groups within the organisation's overall senior management team. The methodology adopted is qualitative, focusing on inquiry‐based learning which enabled the authors to gather data on those aspects of the social structure within which they were embedded that related specifically to the leadership roles available to executives and the networks they formed.

Findings

Generically applicable links between leadership roles are identified that provides structure to the task accomplishment networks within groups executives form when discharging their leadership responsibilities. Characterising leadership in terms of role, and the task networks that executives form, is found to facilitate improvement in the speed with which groups gain productive contributions from their members.

Research limitations/implications

A case study of three demographically similar multinational engineering companies engaged in the design, development and manufacture of rotating turbo‐machinery provides the platform for the research. The concepts advanced will require validating in other organisations of different demographic profiles.

Practical implications

The concepts advanced, and implications discussed, provide an insight into the distributed and networked form of leadership. The practical steps individual executives can take to contribute to the speed with which groups gain productive contributions from their members are highlighted.

Originality/value

This article attempts to assist executives within a senior management team to better adapt and coordinate their behaviour with other executives. In so doing, it is suggested that executives contribute more positively to the development of groups and the speed with which the groups of which they are a part gain productive contributions from their members.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

205

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

1 – 10 of 16