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Article

Yllka Azemi, Wilson Ozuem and Geoff Lancaster

Despite scholarly effort to understand customers’ recovery evaluation, little progress is evident in deciphering how customers develop online failure/recovery perception…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite scholarly effort to understand customers’ recovery evaluation, little progress is evident in deciphering how customers develop online failure/recovery perception. This paper aims to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Social constructivism was the epistemic choice for this study. This approach is holistic and offers a comprehensive understanding of each side of the phenomena. This provided social scientific descriptions of people and their cultural bases and built on, and articulated what was implicit in interpretations of their views.

Findings

Online banking customer groups were identified as: exigent customers, solutionist customers and impulsive customers. Customers’ position in each group determined failure perception, recovery expectation and evaluation, and post-recovery behaviour. Comparisons were observed and discussed in relation to Albania and Kosovo. It was suggested that banks should expand their presence in social media platforms and offer a means to manage online customer communication and spread of online WOM.

Research limitations/implications

For exigent customers, the failure/recovery responsibility is embedded within the provider. This explains their high sensitivity and criteria to define a failure.

Practical implications

Online banking customers’ request of a satisfactory recovery experience included: customer notifications, customer behaviour, customer determination, and the mediator of request. 10;Providers should examine customer failure/recovery experiences in cooperation with other banks which should lead to a higher order understanding of customer withdrawal and disengagement activities.

Social implications

Post-recovery behaviour is linked to the decline of online banking usage, switching to new providers, and the spread of negative online and off-line word-of-mouth.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study on online service failure and recovery strategy to provide information on customers’ unique preferences and expectations in the recovery process. Online customers are organised into a threefold customer typology, and explanation for the providers’ role in the online customer failure-recovery perception construct is presented.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article

Guida Helal, Wilson Ozuem and Geoff Lancaster

A phenomenon that has revolutionized society is the technological millennial approach to communication. Social media has matured into a prime channel for regular…

Abstract

Purpose

A phenomenon that has revolutionized society is the technological millennial approach to communication. Social media has matured into a prime channel for regular interactions and development of brand–customer relationships that enrich a social identity. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how this affects business communications.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized a social constructivist perspective, adopting an inductive and embedded case study strategy.

Findings

Drawing on the social identity theory, this paper examines how evolving social media platforms have impacted on brand perceptions in the fashion apparel and accessories industries. Fashion brands’ online presence provide a platform for customers to supplement social identity based on associations with brands, and ultimately this can shape brand perceptions among customers through promised functional and symbolic benefits.

Research limitations/implications

The paper investigates a specialized marketing activity in the UK. A broader internationally based study would add strength to these findings.

Practical implications

The paper focuses on theoretical and managerial implications and proffers significant roles that social media and identity may play in keeping up with the design and development of marketing communications programs.

Social implications

Multinational corporations have embraced internet technologies and social media in adopting platforms that their brands can use to contribute content to followers.

Originality/value

In total, 30 potential participants, drawn from diverse backgrounds, were contacted via social networking sites, e-mails and telephone. In total, 22 agreed to participate and their mean age was 26. An open-ended questionnaire allowed for elaboration, providing appropriate responses for a second interviewing phase. Four industry professionals were recruited through the researchers’ personal networks to participate in in-depth interviews that sought to investigate the significance of social media as a marketing tool from an industry perspective.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 46 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Geoff Lancaster

A number of problems have been highlighted in relation to the rolesof marketing and engineering and reported in the Journal ofMarketing Management in 1993 (Vol. 9 No. 2…

Abstract

A number of problems have been highlighted in relation to the roles of marketing and engineering and reported in the Journal of Marketing Management in 1993 (Vol. 9 No. 2, pp. 141‐53). This earlier article merely pointed out the problems of this uneasy relationship and hinted at solutions. Much has been researched and reported since then. Attempts to integrate this material over a number of areas including an international dimension, strategic and tactical implications, service and quality improvement issues and product mix decisions. Then goes on to propose solutions based on the researched evidence that is currently forthcoming.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article

Industry's challenge to the academic world to produce graduates with the right blend of new ideas and practical experience has been taken up by Huddersfield Polytechnic…

Abstract

Industry's challenge to the academic world to produce graduates with the right blend of new ideas and practical experience has been taken up by Huddersfield Polytechnic. The course they are pioneering — aimed at producing a marketing strategist who really knows about engineering — is described here by two of the polytechnic's senior lecturers, Geoff Lancaster and Jim Bannister.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 75 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

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Article

Geoff Lancaster and Paul Reynolds

Originally undertaken on behalf of a national multiple foodretailing chain concerned about a 50 per cent fall off in sales at a newstore within six months of its opening…

Abstract

Originally undertaken on behalf of a national multiple food retailing chain concerned about a 50 per cent fall off in sales at a new store within six months of its opening, this research includes a comparative study of two other supermarkets in the same town. Interviews were conducted with 321 store customers and 189 people at random locations elsewhere and a standard questionnaire completed to determine the store features important in attracting their patronage, including price, layout, selection and variety of goods, opening hours, parking facilities and convenience of location. It was established that there was nothing radically wrong with the client company′s store and subsequent implementation of recommended “fine tuning” of a number of its features has led to its developing a comparably favourable level of popularity. However, it is concluded that marketing research should be commissioned at the initial planning stage, with particular reference to suitability of location, rather than as a means of sorting out deficiencies which become apparent only after completion and opening.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 92 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Diana Luck and Geoff Lancaster

Explores the degree to which UK based hotel groups had exploited the medium of electronic customer relationship marketing (E‐CRM). Research is incorporated that…

Abstract

Explores the degree to which UK based hotel groups had exploited the medium of electronic customer relationship marketing (E‐CRM). Research is incorporated that investigated their use of the Internet to verify whether customer relationship marketing was being implemented within online operations or whether their Internet presence merely revolved around the basic functions of “providing information” and “hotel reservations”. The findings and subsequent discussion showed that on the Internet, hotel groups used their relationship with customers to provide rather than gather information. The majority of the hotel groups had only embraced a few elements of E‐CRM and even indicated that they had no intention of being led online by the concept. Although the findings of the questionnaire indicated that hotel groups were generally aware of the potential of Web technologies and strategies, they also showed that companies were not putting this knowledge into practice when it came to implementing E‐CRM. Primary research concluded that hotel groups based in the UK were failing to take advantage of the many opportunities identified through the secondary research.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

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Article

Diana Luck and Geoff Lancaster

The purpose of this paper is to identify how customer relationship marketing/customer relationship management (CRM) can be a strategic solution to hotel companies or part…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify how customer relationship marketing/customer relationship management (CRM) can be a strategic solution to hotel companies or part of their tactics.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary data from academic and news sources are discussed and analysed, together with empirical data collected previously by the first author during the course of her own doctoral research.

Findings

The essence of a customer‐focused environment is a preliminary indication of how the hotel industry can truly benefit from a strategic and focused approach to CRM. Hotel companies have in evidence had recourse to elements of CRM for a variety of strategic and tactical reasons. It is argued that the success of a strategy depends not only on the ability of a company to identify and understand what its target customers genuinely need and want, but also on the company's ability to deliver enhanced value in terms of these specific needs and wants.

Research limitations/implications

Both the strategic options of a company and the achievement of competitive advantage are directly linked to the elements or features that targeted customers genuinely favour. It is suggested that hotel companies must not only identify what their target customers genuinely seek, but that they should also ensure that they themselves understand the dynamics of CRM as a strategy. Unless the fundamentals of CRM are truly understood, it is argued that hotel companies will not be able to optimally integrate CRM in their strategies and benefit from opportunities.

Originality/value

The research has concluded that hotel companies should decide to focus on customer acquisition, customer retention or customer account development: the three strategies associated with CRM.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article

David Walters and Geoff Lancaster

This article is a corollary to three articles published earlier in Management Decision. More precise definitions of a modern value chain are proposed, in terms of it…

Abstract

This article is a corollary to three articles published earlier in Management Decision. More precise definitions of a modern value chain are proposed, in terms of it being a business system that creates end‐user satisfaction and realises the objectives of other member stakeholders. Comparisons are drawn with the current notion of supply chain management and an explanation is given as to how the supply chain fits into the wider perspective put forward in this paper. Ideas are advanced in relation to value chain relationships and options. Models are then suggested relating to a number of well‐known international companies, where the authors have researched, at primary or secondary level.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article

David Walters and Geoff Lancaster

Examines the concepts of value and information in terms of management. Although changes in information technology are the major themes, changes in the marketplace and the…

Abstract

Examines the concepts of value and information in terms of management. Although changes in information technology are the major themes, changes in the marketplace and the challenges facing marketing are also discussed. Examines value‐based marketing and its usefulness to customers, as well as the consequences of customers’ needs, as related to corporate and product credibility. Organizational structure, and its relation to strategic direction, is considered within this context. Concludes that both the concept of the virtual corporation, and the switch in emphasis from marketplace to marketspace, have been advanced.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 37 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Geoff Lancaster and Gerry Brierley

The article in the previous issue provided a background to privatisation and highlighted how previously nationalised companies were managing the transition of change. This…

Abstract

The article in the previous issue provided a background to privatisation and highlighted how previously nationalised companies were managing the transition of change. This article continues this theme at a more detailed level and presents details of applied research into three formerly nationalised companies, namely: The National Remote Sensing Centre, Royal Ordnance Environmental and The Stationery Office. It concluded that pre privatisation, notions of quality service, lower prices and working for the good of consumers was not achieved, as profits were not seen as a commercial requirement. Of the companies researched, two seemed to be strongly influenced by the culture of their new parent company. The two companies that have adopted a marketing culture seem to have fared better than the one company with a strong financial culture. Despite the moves towards being more marketing orientated it is also concluded that all three companies were having difficulty in breaking free from an inbred philosophy of production orientation.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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