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Article
Publication date: 11 August 2022

Mark Loughhead, Ellie Hodges, Heather McIntyre, Nicholas Gerard Procter, Anne Barbara, Brooke Bickley, Geoff Harris, Lisa Huber and Lee Martinez

This discursive paper presents a lived experience leadership model as developed as part of the Activating Lived Experience Leadership (ALEL) project to increase the…

Abstract

Purpose

This discursive paper presents a lived experience leadership model as developed as part of the Activating Lived Experience Leadership (ALEL) project to increase the recognition and understanding of lived experience leadership in mental health and social sectors. The model of lived experience leadership was formulated through a collaboration between the South Australian Lived Experience Leadership & Advocacy Network and the Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Research and Education Group.

Design/methodology/approach

As one of the outcomes of the ALEL research project, this model incorporates findings from a two-year research project in South Australia using participatory action research methodology and cocreation methodology. Focus groups with lived experience leaders, interviews with sector leaders and a national survey of lived experience leaders provided the basis of qualitative data, which was interpreted via an iterative and shared analysis. This work identified intersecting lived experience values, actions, qualities and skills as characteristics of effective lived experience leadership and was visioned and led by lived experience leaders.

Findings

The resulting model frames lived experience leadership as a social movement for recognition, inclusion and justice and is composed of six leadership actions: centres lived experience; stands up and speaks out; champions justice; nurtures connected and collective spaces; mobilises strategically; and leads change. Leadership is also guided by the values of integrity, authenticity, mutuality and intersectionality, and the key positionings of staying peer and sharing power.

Originality/value

This model is based on innovative primary research, which has been developed to encourage understanding across mental health and social sectors on the work of lived experience leaders in seeking change and the value that they offer for systems transformation. It also offers unique insights to guide reflective learning for the lived experience and consumer movement, workers, clinicians, policymakers and communities.

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Thomas William Aspinall, Adrian Gepp, Geoff Harris, Simone Kelly, Colette Southam and Bruce Vanstone

The pitching research template (PRT) is designed to help pitchers identify the core elements that form the framework of any research project. This paper aims to provide a…

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Abstract

Purpose

The pitching research template (PRT) is designed to help pitchers identify the core elements that form the framework of any research project. This paper aims to provide a brief commentary on an application of the PRT to pitch an environmental finance research topic with a personal reflection on the pitch exercise discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper applies the PRT developed by Faff (2015, 2019) to a research project on estimating the strength of carbon pricing signals under the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme.

Findings

The PRT is found to be a valuable tool to refine broad ideas into impactful and novel research contributions. The PRT is recommended for use by all academics regardless of field and particularly PhD students to structure and communicate their research ideas. The PRT is found to be particularly well suited to pitch replication studies, as it effectively summarizes both the “idea” and proposed “twist” of a replication study.

Originality/value

This letter is a reflection on a research teams experience with applying the PRT to pitch a replication study at the 2020 Accounting and Finance Association of Australia and New Zealand event. This event focused on replicable research and was a unique opportunity for research teams to pitch their replication research ideas.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Geoff Harris

This article begins with a discussion of the various costs which occur as a result of armed conflict. It then examines the alternative ways in which wars can be financed…

Abstract

This article begins with a discussion of the various costs which occur as a result of armed conflict. It then examines the alternative ways in which wars can be financed. Sri Lanka's military expenditure increased six fold, in real terms, between 1981 and 1991. This increase appears to have been financed principally from a reduction in capital expenditures and by a diversion of expenditures away from Economic Affairs and Services, and within this category, especially agriculture. The implications for economic growth are examined. It is estimated that the conflict is resulting in a reduction in the rate of growth of GDP by half a percent per annum.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Lynette Harris

To examine how an external performance review process introduced as part of the public sector modernisation agenda in England and Wales has impacted on HR service…

5865

Abstract

Purpose

To examine how an external performance review process introduced as part of the public sector modernisation agenda in England and Wales has impacted on HR service provision and processes in local government and the extent to which it has acted as a catalyst for the development of more integrative and innovative HR practices to support organisational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study analysis of the Best Value Review (BVR) process of HR services at two county and two unitary authorities generated data from multiple sources including interviews, focus groups, consultative meetings as well as internal documentation. This approach was adopted to offer perspectives from different stakeholders in the employment relationship.

Findings

There was found to be a frequent lack of synergy between organisational goals, departmental plans and the performance objectives of individuals combined with an absence of shared understandings about human resourcing priorities or commitment to the processes needed to strategically integrate HR policies.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst providing insights into the Best Value (BV) approach to public sector modernisation, a wider generalisation of the findings cannot be drawn from four case studies.

Practical implications

Line management and the HR function need to share better understandings concerning the HR practices needed to support the modernisation agenda and their respective HR responsibilities.

Originality/value

This paper reveals that the BV performance regime was not encouraging, and even limiting, a corporate approach to the HR policies and practices required to develop longer term organisational capability.

Book part
Publication date: 6 October 2017

Chris Provis

Within both Western and Eastern traditions of virtue ethics, there is a Doctrine of the Mean, suggesting that errors may lie either in excess or in deficiency. The need to…

Abstract

Within both Western and Eastern traditions of virtue ethics, there is a Doctrine of the Mean, suggesting that errors may lie either in excess or in deficiency. The need to avoid both excess and deficiency in the allocation of finite resources is a concern in many sorts of business decisions, some with ethical implications. One finite resource is the resource of attention, and ethical problems can arise from failures to attend to important things. Both Aristotle and classical Confucianism accept the importance of paying attention to circumstances rather than following fixed rules or blindly maximising value. For organisations to give appropriate attention to different things requires suitable intra-organisational reporting and communication. Then there is still need for awareness that resources are finite, and for activity that is sustainable, highlighting the related idea of harmony, especially salient in the Confucian tradition.

Details

Ethics in the Global South
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-205-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

GEOFF DAVIES and JOHN BOYLE

Is social contact with the customer either necessary or profitable to a service industry? Does the salesgirl sell? Or, is she just a packaging‐and‐money‐taking component…

Abstract

Is social contact with the customer either necessary or profitable to a service industry? Does the salesgirl sell? Or, is she just a packaging‐and‐money‐taking component in a selling organisation? We have had the self‐service restaurant with us for several years, why not the self‐service pub? And in transportation, the Victoria Line is almost fully automated. Need an airline provide more than comfortable seats and a convenient schedule of flights? Just how important is it to have a pleasing social relationship with the customer? Obviously, the answers to these questions depend on a variety of factors in any given situation; and, inevitably a prime factor is the economic one. The situation for the airlines is an unusual one: market competition is constrained by the international regulation of fares and schedules and even of the type of meal service on particular routes. As a result the airlines compete in such narrow areas as the ambience of the passengers' surroundings and the social skills of their customer contact staffs.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Stephen Bach, Ian Kessler and Geoff White

To introduce the papers in the special issue.

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Abstract

Purpose

To introduce the papers in the special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides a brief review of the papers.

Findings

The papers cover a broad variety of human resource topics and the range of separate public services, including the impact of performance indicators on HRM practices in the NHS; the impact of Government policy on employment relations in the Fire Service; the use of 360° appraisal systems to improve performance management in the civil service; the impact of “best value” reviews upon HR in local government; the outcomes of new “partnership” relationships between management and unions in a local authority facing a “best value” review; and experimentation with job re‐design in the NHS.

Originality/value

Provides a summary of the perspectives considered within the issue.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Anne B. Piternick

In the fall of 1987, the first of three volumes of a scholarly research atlas—The Historical Atlas of Canada—was published to great acclaim. Describing the Atlas as “the…

Abstract

In the fall of 1987, the first of three volumes of a scholarly research atlas—The Historical Atlas of Canada—was published to great acclaim. Describing the Atlas as “the most innovative, beautiful and successful single volume on the history of Canada, and indeed the most ambitious cartographic venture ever attempted in this country,” the Royal Canadian Geographic Society awarded gold medals to the volume's editor, R.C. Harris, and cartographer/designer, Geoffrey J. Matthews, as well as to the director of the whole Atlas project, W.G. Dean. The volume received many honors, including the Sir John A. Macdonald Prize for the best book of the year on Early Canada from the Canadian Historical Association and the George Perkins Marsh Award in Environmental History from the University of Utah. Reviewers described the volume in superlatives. American reviewers were equally generous in their praise. Petchenik (herself the editor of the Historical Atlas of Early American History) described the volume as “an amazing accomplishment” and commented that “Not only a country but a civilization has been enriched by this publication.” Konrad assessed the volume as “a unique statement unrivaled in its potential impact.” Shuman, a professor of library science, noted that “this atlas, when complete, should stand as a model to be emulated by all other nations, whenever possible.” Pye, writing in the [British] Geographical Journal stated that “it is difficult to imagine that it could be even remotely paralleled in the foreseeable future.” Volume III of the Atlas appeared in 1990 and again won plaudits. Reviewers obviously felt that the high standards set by the first volume had been maintained.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Tom Bourner, Geoff Ruggeri‐Stevens and Jon Bareham

This article is about the Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) degrees that were developed in the UK during the 1990s. It looks at the range of programme structures…

3314

Abstract

This article is about the Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) degrees that were developed in the UK during the 1990s. It looks at the range of programme structures, content and learning support used. The article is based on a content analysis of the 16 DBA programmes in the UK at the end of 1999. The main conclusion is that there is a tension in the form and function of DBAs through their relationship with the traditional PhD. The tension is captured in the question: To what extent do programme developers follow the design of the ’‘gold standard” PhD and to what extent do they design a programme aimed at meeting the learning outcomes of the DBA that distinguish it from a PhD?

Details

Education + Training, vol. 42 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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1 – 10 of 127