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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Geoff Dean and Graeme Pettet

The purpose of this paper is to explore two distinct yet complimentary “structured professional judgement (SPJ)” approaches to terrorist/extremist risk assessment on the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore two distinct yet complimentary “structured professional judgement (SPJ)” approaches to terrorist/extremist risk assessment on the vexing issue of how best to deal with the subjectivity inherently involved in professional judgement.

Design/methodology/approach

An SPJ methodology is considered the best practice approach for assessing terrorism risk. Currently there are four specific terrorism risk instruments that have been published in the literature. Two of these SPJ tools are examined in detail, namely the Violent Extremist Risk Assessment tool (Pressman, 2009; Pressman et al., 2012) and the Structured Assessment of Violent Extremism (SAVE) tool (Dean, 2014). The paper critically unpacks the conceptual and methodological stumbling blocks of an SPJ methodology for controlling human subjectivity.

Findings

The paper presents the case for adopting a “controlling in” approach rather than a “controlling out” approach of an analyst’s subjective tacit (in-the-head) knowledge inherent in their professional judgement. To have a quantifiable SPJ tool that triangulates the multi-dimensionality of terrorism risk which can validate an analyst’s professional judgement is the next logical step in terrorist/extremist risk assessment work. The paper includes a case example of this “controlling in” approach and the validation methodology used by the SAVE software system.

Practical implications

The implications for practice range from incorporating the SAVE system in operational policing/national security work with its quantitative nature, triangulated risk scores, visualisation output of a prioritised case report with in-built alerts, to the required training for system calibration to enhance user proficiency.

Originality/value

This is a highly original and innovative paper as this type of quantified SPJ tool (SAVE) has up until now never been applied before in terrorist/extremist risk assessment work.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2010

Sean Phelps and Geoff Dickson

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2013

Geoff Dean and Petter Gottschalk

This paper aims to present empirical results from a study of attitudes of police managers to different leadership roles in their jobs in two police districts in Norway.

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2800

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present empirical results from a study of attitudes of police managers to different leadership roles in their jobs in two police districts in Norway.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was developed and administered among police managers in two police districts in Norway. Participants in leadership programs were selected for this survey research carried out in March and April 2010. Follo police district and Hedmark police district had a total of 130 participants in these programs with 60 managers from Follo and 70 managers from Hedmark.

Findings

The personnel leader role was found to be most important, followed by the resource allocator role. Responding police managers reported that they felt least competent in the liaison role.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations were that the relatively small sample size restricted the use of sophisticated statistical tools and the generalisability of results to police services other than Norway.

Practical implications

Key implications are the necessary shift from resource allocation to personnel leadership and potential for role conflict.

Social implications

A well‐regarded police service is a prerequisite for the positive perception of law enforcement and justice. Leadership is a key element for ensuring integrity and accountability in policing.

Originality/value

This is the first survey of its kind of Norwegian police managers.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 55 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Morten Emil Berg, Geoff Dean, Petter Gottschalk and Jan Terje Karlsen

The paper aims to argue that leadership by police managers is needed to stimulate and encourage knowledge sharing in police investigations, and to report an empirical…

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2042

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to argue that leadership by police managers is needed to stimulate and encourage knowledge sharing in police investigations, and to report an empirical study of what management roles are most important in investigations.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model was designed based on six management roles and a set of hypothesized relationships. A survey measuring management roles and knowledge sharing attitude was conducted in Norway. Respondents were senior investigation officers.

Findings

Only one management role was found to be a significant determinant of knowledge sharing in police investigations based on the sample used in this survey research within the Norwegian police force: the spokesman role was the only significant role. As a spokesman, the senior investigation officer extends organizational contacts to promote acceptance of the unit and the unit's work within the organization of which they are a part.

Research limitations/implications

The low response rate of 20 percent may make it difficult to draw strong conclusions. Unfortunately, the authors have no information about what kinds of non‐response bias might be present (significant variation between the sample and the population). Future research should be more consistent in identifying the population.

Practical implications

While police investigations (of organized crime, trafficking, narcotics, economic crimes, homicide, etc.) need a stimulating internal structure for knowledge sharing, investigations depend on knowledge sharing with relevant persons and departments outside the unit as well to succeed.

Originality/value

Rather than stressing the importance of leadership in general to stimulate knowledge management, this paper is original as it applies a set of management roles to empirically study where leadership makes a difference for knowledge sharing attitudes.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

Petter Gottschalk, Geoff Dean and Rune Glomseth

The purpose of this paper is to report from an empirical study of white‐collar crime in business organizations and to create insights into perceptions of potential offenders.

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2490

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report from an empirical study of white‐collar crime in business organizations and to create insights into perceptions of potential offenders.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among chief financial officers in the largest business organizations in Norway.

Findings

The study identified financial misconduct by chief executives in the company as the crime associated with the most serious consequences for the company. A person in purchasing and procurement functions is assumed to be most vulnerable to and most likely involved in white‐collar crime.

Research limitations/implications

The survey focused on perceptions and threats rather than actual crime cases that might be included in future research.

Practical implications

Most vulnerable persons, including purchasing executives and chief executive officers, should never be left alone signing invoices and other expenditures on behalf of the firm.

Social implications

A four‐eye principle should be introduced in all business organizations in financial matters.

Originality/value

Chief financial officers' perceptions of vulnerability in top management create new insights into white‐collar crime.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Nicola Douglas, Ian Warwick, Geoff Whitty and Peter Aggleton

Theatre in education (TIE) has recently been advocated as an effective health education method with young people. However, evaluation findings to date have been mixed…

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1118

Abstract

Theatre in education (TIE) has recently been advocated as an effective health education method with young people. However, evaluation findings to date have been mixed. Describes the evaluation of a TIE project involving 19 African and African‐Caribbean young people in inner‐city London. Project objectives included the development of social skills, performing arts skills and opportunities to learn about relevant health topics. The project consisted of workshop sessions culminating in performances at a local theatre. Contextual factors and stakeholder expectations encouraged the development of an innovatory evaluation workshop method. Findings suggested that the intervention was largely successful, with participants reporting opportunities to learn about and discuss relevant health‐related topics, and enhanced social skills and confidence. The evaluation concluded that actively involving young people, addressing their concerns and using activities that engage them in productive group work processes, can be usefully applied whatever the resources available.

Details

Health Education, vol. 100 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Petter Gottschalk

A conceptual framework for police deviance and crime has recently been suggested and presented by other scholars. This research attempts to test the framework empirically…

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668

Abstract

Purpose

A conceptual framework for police deviance and crime has recently been suggested and presented by other scholars. This research attempts to test the framework empirically based on court cases where police employees were prosecuted and convicted.

Design/methodology/approach

The sliding slope in the conceptual framework was separated into two dimensions, motive and damage, respectively. Court cases were coded according to these dimensions.

Findings

Empirical results provide support for the framework by linking seriousness to court sentence in terms of imprisonment days to the sliding slope. However, further validation of the framework is needed.

Originality/value

It is useful to both academics and practitioners to have an organizing framework when considering police complaints and prosecuting police crime.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 54 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

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412

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 54 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

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