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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1993

Geoff Barnsley

Looks at three very different organizations which introduced total quality management following a common framework involving a four‐stage approach to implementation…

Abstract

Looks at three very different organizations which introduced total quality management following a common framework involving a four‐stage approach to implementation. Through the case studies, describes the TQM process which involved diagnosing areas of weakness and strength, commitment building, training in‐house facilitators to help others to use improvement tools and techniques and to facilitate change. Each of the three companies developed their own, different styles of implementing TQM, but all demonstrated that TQM is a process of continuous improvement.

Details

Training for Quality, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Geoff Barnsley

Customer care can be an important factor in your quality improvement process, allowing you to enhance service quality and differentiate you from the competition. It can…

Abstract

Customer care can be an important factor in your quality improvement process, allowing you to enhance service quality and differentiate you from the competition. It can also be simply a substantial investment in training which results in a lot of smiling to cover the inadequacies of your service to clients.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Geoff Sykes, Mike Simpson and Eric Shipley

Presents a case study, based on semi‐structured interviews and shopfloor observations, of an optical fibre manufacturer in the North of England which has recently been…

Abstract

Presents a case study, based on semi‐structured interviews and shopfloor observations, of an optical fibre manufacturer in the North of England which has recently been taken over by a German company. The company was a traditional manufacturing organization, hierarchical and functional, characterized by tension between management, supervisors and workforce. Despite a healthy order book and low labour costs management perceived a threat from European competitors who provided faster delivery and higher quality. Management introduced teamworking and empowerment and achieved some success in solving the problems; in effect it changed from a modern to a postmodern organization. Although theory corresponds with practice to some extent, explores some areas in which theory and practice seem mismatched. Casts doubt on the transferability of this company’s expertise to its German parent.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Ian Fitzgerald

To demonstrate how government policy on fires service reform was initially challenged by a stubbornly resistant fire service corporatism but finally dismantled following…

Abstract

Purpose

To demonstrate how government policy on fires service reform was initially challenged by a stubbornly resistant fire service corporatism but finally dismantled following the 2003 fire service White Paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on longitudinal case study data that includes 50 semi‐structured interviews with key fire service personnel at regional and national levels.

Findings

This paper examines the roots of corporatism at national and local levels and demonstrates how the Fire Brigades Union (FBU) had significant levels of influence on management decision‐making. This was strongly reflected in the key role of the FBU in the industrial relations process that enabled the union to protect “entrenched” working practices. However, at a local level longstanding corporatist partnerships began to break down as a financial crisis arose and management took a more proactive approach. Corporatist structures at a national level, though, remained and it was not until the Labour government's second term of office that these national structures were overhauled following a White Paper and legislation.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates that whilst fire service management has consolidated its position under the Labour administration it has proved a disaster for the FBU.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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