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Article

Karen Morris and Genevieve Smyth

Occupational therapists working in mental health services in the UK are under increasing scrutiny to provide both clinically and cost-effective services. The profession…

Abstract

Purpose

Occupational therapists working in mental health services in the UK are under increasing scrutiny to provide both clinically and cost-effective services. The profession has indicated that a stronger evidence base would help promote the unique contribution of occupational therapy when influencing service managers and government bodies. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The Royal College of Occupational Therapists (RCOT) and its Specialist Section – Mental Health carried out a survey to gauge recent research capacity among occupational therapists working in mental health services in the UK and to seek their views about how to further increase research capacity and partnerships.

Findings

Of the 145 participants approximately half had been involved in research in the past five years, and most had involved research partnerships. A number had successfully applied for funding and about half of the research carried out had been disseminated. The participants felt that methods to increase research capacity and partnerships should continue to include improving research leadership and networks; promoting research skills through formal studies and increasing research dissemination.

Originality/value

A variety of methods will continue to be required to expand the evidence base. RCOT and its Specialist Sections continue to have an important role developing research capacity and partnerships.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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Article

Peter McGill, Jill Bradshaw, Genevieve Smyth, Maria Hurman and Ashok Roy

The purpose of this paper is to outline the role played by different aspects of the social, physical and organisational environments in preventing behaviour described as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the role played by different aspects of the social, physical and organisational environments in preventing behaviour described as challenging in people with learning disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual elaboration drawing on research and practice literature.

Findings

Community placements for people with learning disabilities should develop the characteristics of capable environments. Such characteristics are associated with prevention of challenging behaviour and improved quality of life outcomes.

Originality/value

The notion of the capable environment may help to shift the focus from the individual who displays behaviour described as challenging to the characteristics of the social, physical and organisational supports that they receive.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Keywords

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Article

Wendy Osborn and Genevieve Smyth

The final report for allied health professions Enhance, Include, Evolve: New Ways of Working for allied health professionals (Care Services Improvement…

Abstract

The final report for allied health professions Enhance, Include, Evolve: New Ways of Working for allied health professionals (Care Services Improvement Partnership/National Institute of Mental Health in England, 2008a) is the culmination of a journey that the allied health professionals have travelled over the past six years. Their aim has been to refresh practice in the light of recent policies and initiatives and, in particular, New Ways of Working.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Abstract

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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