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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1992

Tom Blackett

Attempts to describe some of the forces which, from a marketingperspective, drive and shape the pharmaceutical industry. The industryis of massive importance to the UK…

Abstract

Attempts to describe some of the forces which, from a marketing perspective, drive and shape the pharmaceutical industry. The industry is of massive importance to the UK economy and rarely a day goes by without mention in the press of the activities of the leading manufacturers – Glaxo, Wellcome, SmithKline Beecham etc. British companies are amongst the most innovative in the world and pharmaceuticals is the only area of science where the UK can claim to match, and frequently outperform, the Americans, Japanese and Germans. Written by a layman for the benefit of laymen.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 10 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Moe Alramahi

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the legal status of domain names from both a contractual and a property right perspective, and to consider whether domain names are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify the legal status of domain names from both a contractual and a property right perspective, and to consider whether domain names are to be considered as a new form of property, in particular as virtual property.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper approaches the topic from contractual perspective. It then examines the concept and various property law theories. This is followed by an analysis to the intangibility of domain names and the appropriate category of protection.

Findings

Domain names are creatures of contract and contract law will provide some form of protection. According to the bundle of rights theory, domain names are intangible property with limitations. Some names are very valuable but nevertheless attract no protection beyond contractual rights. These names should be clothed with property rights protection. The relevant form of property rights is still contentious issue.

Originality/value

The nature of rights over domain names is a key emerging issue in the area of information technology law, with little to guide lawyers and judges. There is currently no consensus on what the legal status of a domain name is and opinions vary about the nature of these rights. The paper offers an insight to the nature of rights in an attempt to further the protection and recognition of rights over domain names.

Details

Journal of International Trade Law and Policy, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-0024

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Shamindra Nath Sanyal and Saroj Kumar Datta

The purpose of this paper is to find out the relationship between the qualities of generic drugs perceived by the physicians and brand equity of the branded generics and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out the relationship between the qualities of generic drugs perceived by the physicians and brand equity of the branded generics and to examine the physicians' perceptions of prescribing generic drugs for selective medical conditions in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was carried out across six major cities in Eastern India with 392 physicians. Here components of perceived quality, i.e. intrinsic cues and extrinsic cues are hypothesized to influence perceived quality of branded generics which in turn influence brand equity. It is also hypothesized that respondents' quality experience is assimilated towards their quality expectations, independent of small variations in objective quality of the drug.

Findings

Results showed that perceived quality of branded generics significantly, but indirectly, affected brand equity through the mediating variables, intrinsic cues and extrinsic cues. The results also showed that physicians' quality experience leads to quality expectations, independent of small variations in drug quality on five common yet serious diseases in India.

Practical implications

Current research finds that for prescription‐based branded generic drugs, perceived quality mainly depends on intrinsic cues; therefore, managers should be interested in intrinsic cues that increase brand equity and necessary marketing actions should be implemented accordingly.

Originality/value

No other scholarly article has been developed, so far, analyzing the effect of perceived quality on brand equity in the Indian branded generic drug segment. Besides providing evidence from the Indian pharmaceutical context about the impact of quality cues, the paper also presents evidence on physicians' quality observation of branded generics on five common yet serious diseases in India.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2018

Ross D. Petty

The purpose of this paper is to examine the debate about brand marketing that occurred as part of the 1930s consumer movement and continued after the Second World War in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the debate about brand marketing that occurred as part of the 1930s consumer movement and continued after the Second World War in academic and regulatory circles.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents an historical account of the anti-brand marketing movement using a qualitative approach. It examines both primary and secondary historical sources as well as legal statutes, regulatory agency actions, judicial cases and newspaper and trade journal stories.

Findings

In response to the rise of brand marketing in the latter 1800s and early 1900s, the USA experienced an anti-brand marketing movement that lasted half a century. The first stage was public as part of the consumer movement but was overshadowed by the product safety and truth-in-advertising concerns. The consumer movement stalled when the USA entered the Second World War, but brand marketing continued to raise questions during the war as the US government attempted to regulate the provisions of goods during the war. After the war, the public accepted brand marketing. Continuing anti-brand marketing criticism was largely confined to academic writings and regulatory activities. Ultimately, many of the stage-two challenges to brand marketing went nowhere, but a few led to regulations that continue today.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to recognize a two-stage anti-brand marketing movement in the USA from 1929 to 1980 that has left a small but significant modern-day regulatory legacy.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

A. Parasuraman

The growing consumer demand for, and acceptance of, so‐called no‐name brands of a variety of food, as well as nonfood, products—from cooking oil to cotton swabs, tomato…

Abstract

The growing consumer demand for, and acceptance of, so‐called no‐name brands of a variety of food, as well as nonfood, products—from cooking oil to cotton swabs, tomato juice to toilet tissue, brownie mix to beauty aids, and liquor to laundry detergent—is a significant development in retailing. No‐name brands have captured about 2 percent of the total grocery sales in the United States in just three years . According to a recent report prepared by A.C. Nielsen Company, no‐name brand shares in the top fifty product categories in which they are strongest range from 4 to 10 percent of the category sales volumes; this is in spite of the fact that no‐name brands have not yet achieved the broad levels of retail distribution enjoyed by branded products . In fact, the share of no‐name brands is as high as 16 percent in certain product categories based on the sales volumes of only those retail outlets that carry them. Contrary to industry expectations, the growth of no‐name brands appears to be a persistent market phenomenon rather than a passing fad. Indeed, retail chains such as Ralph's on the west coast and Jewel in the midwest now have “generic” aisles in their stores.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Kathleen Iacocca, James Sawhill and Yao Zhao

This paper aims to investigate why brand-name drugs are priced higher than their generic equivalents in the US market. The authors hypothesize that some consumers have a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate why brand-name drugs are priced higher than their generic equivalents in the US market. The authors hypothesize that some consumers have a preference for brand names, which outweighs the cost savings realized by switching to generics. Consumers may prefer a brand drug because the brand may have a higher perceived quality due to advertising and other promotional activities. Additionally, individuals are habitual in their consumption of prescription drugs, which leads to continued use of the brand in the face of generic competition.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a structural demand model and proceed to estimate it using wholesale price and demand data from the years 2000 through 2004.

Findings

The results of our analysis reveal that customers have a strong preference for brand drugs. In addition, consumers exhibit high switching costs for prescription drugs.

Originality/value

Considering the price and quantity of prescriptions filled each day, determining why brand drugs do not lower their prices to compete with their generic equivalents is an important question. Unfortunately, the existing literature only acknowledges this counter-intuitive business practice, but does not mathematically explain it. The authors address this knowledge gap in literature and provide important insight for all players in this industry including consumers, pharmaceutical manufacturers and health insurance companies.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1960

A.E. MA TOOTH

The rather drastic changes in the Cataloguing Rules of University College London, which were described in Vol. 12, no. 2 of this journal, published in June 1956, soon…

Abstract

The rather drastic changes in the Cataloguing Rules of University College London, which were described in Vol. 12, no. 2 of this journal, published in June 1956, soon became accepted routine to the inconvenience of no one, so far as is known, except of the cataloguers whose task it was to make the necessary adjustments and to recatalogue small batches of cards from time to time. This inconvenience was more than compensated by the comparative simplicity of headings for both main and subsidiary entries, and by a reduction in the number of added entries needed.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1981

I.W.B. Nye

Systematics is often used, or rather misused, as a synonym of taxonomy, to mean classification. Systematics is, however, a much more general term covering the study of the…

Abstract

Systematics is often used, or rather misused, as a synonym of taxonomy, to mean classification. Systematics is, however, a much more general term covering the study of the diversity of organisms, and includes such subjects as genetics, biogeography, taxonomy and nomenclature.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1982

Elizabeth A. Nies

The health movement that has been sweeping this country has given rise to increased consumer awareness of both prescription and nonprescription medications. One of several…

Abstract

The health movement that has been sweeping this country has given rise to increased consumer awareness of both prescription and nonprescription medications. One of several responses to this heightened interest has been a plethora of drug information publications aimed at the general public audience. Some of these publications became so popular they attained positions on the best‐seller list. At the same time books, such as the PDR, that had generally been available only to health professionals began to find their way into popular bookstores.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Shamindra Nath Sanyal, Saroj Kumar Datta and Asok Kumar Banerjee

The purpose of this paper is to examine the physicians’ attitude toward branded generic drugs in prescribing those drugs in some selective medical conditions and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the physicians’ attitude toward branded generic drugs in prescribing those drugs in some selective medical conditions and to identify the factors that influence physicians’ behavior toward prescribing branded generic drugs in the said selective medical conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was carried out across six major cities in eastern India with 301 physicians. The current study introduced some significant elements into the modified technology acceptance model (TAM) with title the extended tam for product usage (TETPU) to analyze the prescribing factors that influence physicians in five common yet serious medical conditions in India. Out of nine factors considered here, seven were selected from the previous literature studies of different product segments and two were proposed by the authors. Demographic factor was proposed as the confounding variable.

Findings

The results indicated that apart from the factors “perceived no need” and “physicians’ perception and need achievement” rest of the factors showed satisfactory to excellent results.

Practical implications

The current study findings may enable the pharmaceutical managers to revise or modify their current marketing communication and other brand-building strategies so as to achieve a superior performance that offers them a competitive advantage.

Originality/value

The paper fulfils a need for advancing the knowledge on the physician’s prescription influencing factors by introducing the newer aspects of the concept and offers a theoretical framework for the academia and practical framework for the managers who desire to implement the strategies to achieve competitive advantage.

Details

International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Healthcare Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6123

Keywords

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