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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Kent Grayson, Sachin Waikar and Gene Smith

A senior product manager for a telecommunications company has been asked to propose ideas for generating new revenue from video gamers who use his company's Internet…

Abstract

A senior product manager for a telecommunications company has been asked to propose ideas for generating new revenue from video gamers who use his company's Internet services. The manager has commissioned the development of “experience maps” for three subsegments within the gamer segment. The experience maps, which are reproduced in the case, provide students with an opportunity to generate customer insights based on real qualitative data.

After students have analyzed the case, they will be more comfortable analyzing unstructured consumer insight data with limited direction, as well as with the inductive reasoning necessary to develop marketing insights based on qualitative research results. They will also have a better understanding of how customer insights can drive product development decisions and a greater understanding of experience maps as a consumer research tool

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Gene Smith

The attached paper describes the keys to success for Southwest Airlines, including its approach to quality management. Southwest did not implement a formalized “quality…

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Abstract

The attached paper describes the keys to success for Southwest Airlines, including its approach to quality management. Southwest did not implement a formalized “quality management program.” Numerous companies in the USA have implemented formalized “quality management programs” and they failed because they were “programs of the month.” Implementing “quality” throughout a company is not the result of a formalized program but requires a cultural change in the way daily activities are conducted. The requirement of “doing it right the first time” must be integrated into the daily activities or culture of the company. The chairman of the board and president of a company must establish the tone for quality in not only what they communicate but also in their daily actions. Quality must be ingrained in the overall business model and strategies of a company. Southwest is very effective in integrating the importance of quality in its overall business model, strategic plan and its daily operational activities. Southwest did not engage outside consultants to develop a “quality program” but its style, culture and emphasis on quality were implemented in Southwest’s daily activities by Herb Kelleher, Chairman of the Board, and his management team.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Book part
Publication date: 5 January 2005

Brian J. Loasby

“It is now becoming widely recognised that many of the central unresolved problems in economics turn on questions of knowledge” (Loasby, 1986, p. 41). Nearly twenty years…

Abstract

“It is now becoming widely recognised that many of the central unresolved problems in economics turn on questions of knowledge” (Loasby, 1986, p. 41). Nearly twenty years after that was written, it may be appropriate to take a (necessarily selective) look at ideas about human knowledge and to suggest some implications for the practice of economists. The ideas with which we shall begin long predate the observation that I have just recalled; and the delay in recognising their implications indicates how the growth of knowledge is dependent on the formation of appropriate linkages – which of course are not recognised as appropriate until they have been formed. Adam Smith, Alfred Marshall and Friedrich Hayek were all confronted with the uncertain basis of knowledge before they began their study of economics; and what their responses have in common is not only a theoretical focus on the process by which people develop what we call “knowledge” but also a reliance on similar kinds of process, which result in the formation of connections within particular domains. Each author recognises the impossibility of demonstrating that any such process can deliver proven truth; instead each envisages sequences of trial and error within particular contexts, leading to the preservation of what seems to work – until it no longer does, when a new sequence of trial and error begins. In other words, they all offer evolutionary theories, Marshall and Hayek explicitly so, while Smith, directly and indirectly, had a major influence on the development of Darwin’s ideas.

Details

Evolutionary Psychology and Economic Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-138-5

Book part
Publication date: 9 August 2012

Elena Frank

The discovery of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes has facilitated the construction of a new group of women referred to as “previvors” – individuals who are survivors of a…

Abstract

The discovery of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes has facilitated the construction of a new group of women referred to as “previvors” – individuals who are survivors of a predisposition to cancer but who are not presently ill. These “previvors” constitute the first generation of women faced with the option to make preventative health choices based on this kind of genetic information. Therefore, this research examines how young BRCA positive women negotiate the medicalization of their bodies based on their new “potentially ill” status. Analyzing the posts in an online forum specifically for “young previvors,” the findings indicate that the majority share an “anything's better than cancer” mantra, suggesting that fear of death largely outweighs all other fears or concerns. Consequently, asserting control by taking preventative action is considered a mechanism for quelling the fear, uncertainty, and stress associated with being a BRCA gene carrier. Constructed as a medical diagnosis, carrying the BRCA mutation is consequently perceived as requiring a corresponding medical treatment. As such, despite the connection these women describe feeling with the “parts that make them a woman,” they appear to believe that they must undergo prophylactic surgery and disassociate from their bodies in order to save their lives. Ultimately, they convince themselves to view their breasts and ovaries simply as nonessential organs, rather than as core components of their feminine, sexual, and reproductive identities.

Details

Issues in Health and Health Care Related to Race/Ethnicity, Immigration, SES and Gender
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-125-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Georg Ivanovas

It was the aim to apply basic epistemological concepts, as presented by Heinz von Foerster, to current problems of medicine and biology.

Abstract

Purpose

It was the aim to apply basic epistemological concepts, as presented by Heinz von Foerster, to current problems of medicine and biology.

Design/methodology/approach

The relation of genes and human behaviour is an important issue in current medical discourse. Many states and diseases are claimed to be caused by a genetical disposition. To prove the soundness of such claims, a strict methodology has to be applied.

Findings

The usual approach of combining genetical findings with observed behaviour is based on an insufficient epistemology. The neglect of recursive processes leads to misinterpretations that have far‐reaching consequences, especially if disease and therapy are concerned.

Research limitations/implications

A precise analysis of recursive traits would allow more reliable models of the relation between genetical disposition and environmental influence.

Originality/value

The paper reflects trivial or non‐trivial relations in social behaviour that are often neglected.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 34 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Justice Michael Kirby

Discusses the Human Genome Project, which aims to map the structureand function of approximately 100,000 genes in the human body. Describessome of the ethical and legal…

Abstract

Discusses the Human Genome Project, which aims to map the structure and function of approximately 100,000 genes in the human body. Describes some of the ethical and legal problems of genomic research, pointing out that such research presents both promise and problems and that it must be conducted according to well‐defined, rational rules if human rights are to be protected. Calls for a multidisciplinary involvement, both nationally and internationally, in the establishment of the necessary laws; and exhorts Australia and New Zealand, which have hitherto remained largely uninvolved, to make a larger contribution both towards the debate and towards funding for the project.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 1 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2019

Andrew Iliadis

Applied computational ontologies (ACOs) are increasingly used in data science domains to produce semantic enhancement and interoperability among divergent data. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Applied computational ontologies (ACOs) are increasingly used in data science domains to produce semantic enhancement and interoperability among divergent data. The purpose of this paper is to propose and implement a methodology for researching the sociotechnical dimensions of data-driven ontology work, and to show how applied ontologies are communicatively constituted with ethical implications.

Design/methodology/approach

The underlying idea is to use a data assemblage approach for studying ACOs and the methods they use to add semantic complexity to digital data. The author uses a mixed methods approach, providing an analysis of the widely used Basic Formal Ontology (BFO) through digital methods and visualizations, and presents historical research alongside unstructured interview data with leading experts in BFO development.

Findings

The author found that ACOs are products of communal deliberation and decision making across institutions. While ACOs are beneficial for facilitating semantic data interoperability, ACOs may produce unintended effects when semantically enhancing data about social entities and relations. ACOs can have potentially negative consequences for data subjects. Further critical work is needed for understanding how ACOs are applied in contexts like the semantic web, digital platforms, and topic domains. ACOs do not merely reflect social reality through data but are active actors in the social shaping of data.

Originality/value

The paper presents a new approach for studying ACOs, the social impact of ACO work, and describes methods that may be used to produce further applied ontology studies.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Book part
Publication date: 30 August 2014

Yunseon Choi

This chapter aims to discuss the issues associated with social indexing as a solution to the challenges of current information organization systems by investigating the…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter aims to discuss the issues associated with social indexing as a solution to the challenges of current information organization systems by investigating the quality and efficacy of social indexing.

Design/methodology/approach

The chapter focuses on the study which compared indexing similarity between two professional groups and also compared social tagging and professional indexing. The study employed the method of the modified vector-based Indexing Consistency Density (ICD) with three different similarity measures: cosine similarity, dot product similarity, and Euclidean distance metric.

Findings

The investigation of social indexing in comparison of professional indexing demonstrates that social tags are more accurate descriptions of resources and reflection of more current terminology than controlled vocabulary. Through the characteristics of social tagging discussed in this chapter, we have a clearer understanding of the extent to which social indexing can be used to replace and improve upon professional indexing.

Research limitations/implications

As investment in professionally developed web directories diminishes, it becomes even more critical to understand the characteristics of social tagging and to obtain benefit from it. In future research, the examination of subjective tags needs to be conducted. A survey or user study on tagging behavior also would help to extend understanding of social indexing practices.

Details

New Directions in Information Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-559-3

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2009

Tom Steele

This paper aims to examine the social phenomenon known as tagging and its use in libraries' online catalogs, discussing folksonomies, social bookmarking, and tagging web…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the social phenomenon known as tagging and its use in libraries' online catalogs, discussing folksonomies, social bookmarking, and tagging web sites. The paper also seeks to weigh the advantages and disadvantages of a controlled vocabulary such as the Library of Congress Subject Headings, and how tagging can assist the LCSH in information retrieval. LibraryThing and the University of Pennsylvania's PennTags are examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Review of recent literature in print and online, as well as browsing Library OPACs using tagging, was the basis for the paper.

Findings

The paper concludes that access to information is the main purpose of cataloging, and use of both traditional methods of cataloging as well as interactive methods such as tagging is a valid method for reaching library users of the future.

Originality/value

The paper lists many problems and concerns of which to be aware, if a library should choose to adopt tagging for their catalog. It looks at the options of using outside web sites to provide the tags as well as creating tagging systems on the library's web site itself. The focus of the paper is how libraries can use tagging, as opposed to the phenomenon of tagging itself, as well as a discussion of how tagging compares with controlled vocabularies.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2009

James W. Grimm, D. Clayton Smith, Gene L. Theodori and A.E. Luloff

Information gathered from a sample of residents in four rural Pennsylvania communities is used to test the net effects of household resources (financial assets, supports…

Abstract

Information gathered from a sample of residents in four rural Pennsylvania communities is used to test the net effects of household resources (financial assets, supports, and community ties) upon respondents’ physical health and emotional well-being. Size and composition of households, types, and extent of insurance coverage, age, and aspects of household liquidity had major net effects upon physical health. Some measures of liquidity, a range of supports, and community ties had net impacts upon emotional well-being. The importance of considering the collective health needs of rural households in relation to their affordability and sustainability is stressed. The public policy implications of our results are discussed.

Details

Social Sources of Disparities in Health and Health Care and Linkages to Policy, Population Concerns and Providers of Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-835-9

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