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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2008

Paul Bowen, Keith Cattell, Kathy Michell and Peter Edwards

The main objective of this paper is to report the findings of a comparative study examining levels of job satisfaction of employees and employers in the quantity surveying…

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2086

Abstract

Purpose

The main objective of this paper is to report the findings of a comparative study examining levels of job satisfaction of employees and employers in the quantity surveying profession in South Africa. Factors that have an impact on job satisfaction are explored. In addition, issues relating to gender at work and harassment and discrimination in the workplace are examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained via a web‐based, national questionnaire survey of the registered quantity surveyors. A response rate of 10 per cent was achieved. Of the 146 respondents, 43 per cent are salaried employees whilst 57 per cent are employers. Likert scales were used to measure respondent perceptions regarding factors influencing their job satisfaction, and to explore gender‐related issues at work and perceived instances of harassment and discrimination in the workplace.

Findings

Contrary to the published literature, employers and employees do not differ significantly in levels of job satisfaction, although twice as many employers than employees claim to “love it”. Employers report a greater presence at work of motivating factors than do employees, namely; salary; promotion prospects; personal satisfaction; recognition, autonomy, team participation, and social interaction. Gender and race issues at work are a problem, with more employers than employees claiming instances of racial harassment and discrimination at work. Employees report significantly more instances of discrimination on the basis of gender than employers.

Originality/value

Little is known about the job satisfaction of design team professionals, particularly quantity surveyors. The results provide valuable insight into the job satisfaction experienced by employers and employees in quantity surveying practices.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Doris Ruth Eikhof

The purpose of this paper is to uncover the hidden gender consequences of three current trends in the workplace, the increase in knowledge work, information and…

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10102

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to uncover the hidden gender consequences of three current trends in the workplace, the increase in knowledge work, information and communication technology (ICT) and work‐life balance policies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper synthesizes and analyses existing empirical evidence from research on knowledge work, work‐life balance and boundary, women's work and careers.

Findings

Knowledge work, ICT and work‐life balance policies are found to increase the temporal and geographical flexibility of work. Such enhanced flexibility should facilitate women's participation and advancement in work and therefore gender equality. However, all three trends also have hidden gender consequences that significantly prevent women from participating and advancing.

Research limitations/implications

Research needs to explicitly integrate evidence from across research areas and disciplines to appreciate the complexity and contentiousness of current workplace developments from a gender perspective.

Practical implications

A public debate is needed that better communicates and challenges the complexity of gender issues in the twenty‐first century workplace, in order to raise critical awareness amongst individual workers, as well as practitioners and policy makers, and to lead to better informed decision making.

Originality/value

A gender‐focused analysis and synthesis of evidence across the research areas included in this paper is currently lacking. The paper thus makes a novel contribution to the academic debate on gender equality in the workplace and provides an improved basis for better informed discussions between academics, policy makers and practitioners about how to achieve gender equality in today's world of work.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Kanchana Wijayawardena, Nilupama Wijewardena and Ramanie Samaratunge

Given the limited research on women in information technology (IT) sectors in emerging economies and the importance of understanding their experiences working in highly…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the limited research on women in information technology (IT) sectors in emerging economies and the importance of understanding their experiences working in highly gendered IT firms, the purpose of this paper is to examine the specific gendered strategies used by women engineers to stay in gender-atypical IT firms in Sri Lanka using job embeddedness as a theoretical lens.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was done through in-depth interviews and focus group discussions on a sample of 14 women engineers employed in five leading IT firms in Sri Lanka.

Findings

Respondents perceived the work role expectations in the Sri Lankan IT industry as masculine. Respondents compromised their own gender identities to engage in four distinct strategies to link and fit with the prevailing work role expectations. “Using a hybrid style” and “being passive and neutral” were respondents’ link strategies, while “adopting masculine traits” and “demonstrating self-confidence” related to their fit strategies.

Research limitations/implications

Men and women who aspire to enter the IT sector need to be pre-prepared and educated about the characteristics of IT cultures and prevailing gender norms along with the subject knowledge. Managers of IT firms need to create positive work environments for their women employees that aid them to fit and link with their workplaces.

Originality/value

The study provides a deeper understanding of how women manage gender-related issues within gender-atypical IT firms in Sri Lanka and stay in their employment.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2004

Belle Rose Ragins

Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) employees constitute one of the largest, but least studied, minority groups in the workforce. This article examines what we know, and what…

Abstract

Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) employees constitute one of the largest, but least studied, minority groups in the workforce. This article examines what we know, and what we need to know, about the career and workplace experiences of this understudied population. The construct of sexual identity is defined, followed by a review of the research on sexual orientation in the workplace. Then an analysis of the differences between LGB employees and other stigmatized groups is presented. Three unique challenges facing LGB employees are identified, and conceptual models are developed that explain underlying processes. Finally, career theories are critically analyzed, and an identity-based longitudinal theory of LGB careers is presented.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-103-3

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Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Abstract

Details

Practical and Theoretical Implications of Successfully Doing Difference in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-678-1

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Hayfaa Tlaiss and Saleema Kauser

The purpose of this paper is to address the research gap on Lebanese women managers and to demonstrate how gender, work, and family factors influence the career…

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6270

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the research gap on Lebanese women managers and to demonstrate how gender, work, and family factors influence the career advancement of women managers.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is qualitative in nature. A total of 32 in‐depth face‐to face interviews were conducted with 32 women managers.

Findings

Interview data reveal that Lebanese women managers do not perceive gender‐centered factors as obstacles to career advancement. The women in the study used different terms to describe the impact of gender, work, and family factors on their career progression to those found in existing literature. Their responsibilities towards their families were not perceived as barriers hindering their career progress. In addition, their personality traits, aspirations for management, levels of educational attainment and work experience, and family‐related factors were also not perceived as inhibiting their careers.

Practical implications

The paper provides new practical insights into the relationships and the interconnections between Arab society, women, and their managerial careers. A strong theme is the significant role of Wasta, the reliance and dependence on social connections versus personal education and achievements to achieve career progress, in enhancing career progression and how gender is less of a criterion in the presence of Wasta.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the limited knowledge about women and management in Lebanon, as well as the Middle Eastern region in general.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Clarice Santos and Adriana V. Garibaldi de Hilal

The purpose of this paper is to examine gender issues in Brazil from the perceptions, experiences, and discourses of professional women in Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine gender issues in Brazil from the perceptions, experiences, and discourses of professional women in Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on 26 in-depth interviews with female professionals. The methodology consists of an exploratory approach through content analysis.

Findings

Despite the fact that Brazil demonstrates an idealized national ethos that promotes equality, gender roles are still very traditional. Participants recognized gender issues at work, including covert discrimination, though most did not acknowledge experiencing them personally.

Originality/value

There is dissonance between global trends and the actual experience of female professionals in Brazil. Although participants rejected the idea of personally experiencing inequality, they acknowledge its existence in human resources (HR) practices. This leads to a self-fulfilling prophecy where gender inequality is perpetuated and organizations and HR departments do not seem to have a proactive role as change agents.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Richard Metters

Work that is considered appropriate for only one gender by the indigenous culture is explored. The focus is on the operational issues that accrue due to the combination of…

Abstract

Purpose

Work that is considered appropriate for only one gender by the indigenous culture is explored. The focus is on the operational issues that accrue due to the combination of what is deemed appropriate treatment to, and activities of, women. Global differences in the operational sub-categories of business location, layout, the implementation of process improvement programs, shift scheduling, operational compliance, the strategic capability of volume flexibility, and other issues are explored. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature from the disparate fields of women’s studies, anthropology, law, developmental economics, and management are synthesized.

Findings

There are extreme differences internationally in the viability of operational practices involving shift work, facility location, and other production issues. Particularly, research involving the implementation of quality management programs may be compromised due to gender effects.

Practical implications

A large number of practical issues are discussed. The viability and wisdom of many operational practices being copied from different cultures is addressed.

Originality/value

This work is a synthesis of the same subjects from widely disparate intellectual domains. The author informs management scholars and managers from unusual sources in medicine, women’s studies, anthropology, developmental economics, and law.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Ritsa Fotinatos‐Ventouratos and Cary Cooper

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a large community wide survey on occupational stress.

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6361

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a large community wide survey on occupational stress.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via a questionnaire, using a random sample of the general population in the north east region of England, UK. A total of 2,500 people completed questionnaires, which represented all socio‐economic groups.

Findings

The results of the bivariate analysis revealed significant differences in terms of physical and psychological wellbeing amongst the male and female sample. Multiple regression analysis provided evidence that the issue of job satisfaction is critical and different amongst both males and females and social class.

Originality/value

This research investigated the combined effects of both gender differences at work and social class in one given study, using one instrument, in one community setting. Recommendations for future research at the theoretical and practical level are given.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Azura Omar and Marilyn J. Davidson

Provides a review of the position of women in management in a number of countries. Describes how in almost all countries, management positions are dominated by men…

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5530

Abstract

Provides a review of the position of women in management in a number of countries. Describes how in almost all countries, management positions are dominated by men. Concludes that, although many similarities were found in women’s work experience across cultures, cultural factors accounted for the unique experiences of women in a given country.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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