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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Intan Azurin Zainee and Fadilah Puteh

As the new emerging workforce, Generation Y (Gen Y) is said to be demanding, influential and possessing strong bargaining power. This study examines the impact of…

Abstract

Purpose

As the new emerging workforce, Generation Y (Gen Y) is said to be demanding, influential and possessing strong bargaining power. This study examines the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on employee retention among Gen Y in the accounting profession. CSR is widely researched subject due to its applicability in multidisciplinary fields and industries. This research intends to investigate the nexus between CSR and human capital disciplines. It employs Carroll's pyramid of CSR as the main theoretical framework to establish its relationship with talent retention among Gen Y employees. This study has a threefold aim: (1) to determine the level of CSR awareness, (2) to determine the relationship between CSR dimensions and talent retention and (3) to examine the effect of CSR dimensions on talent retention.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opted for an exploratory study using the structured questionnaire. A total of 377 Gen Y accountants who are currently working in accounting firms located in Klang Valley, Malaysia, were involved as respondents. Data were analyzed using descriptive, correlation and regression analyses to answer the research objectives.

Findings

The paper provided empirical insights about the impact brought by CSR practices in financial-based firms on employee retention. It was found that all CSR elements, as suggested by Carroll, have a significant relationship with employees’ retention. The interaction between the CSR elements and employee retention accounts for 16% of the research model. Based on the multiple regression analysis, it was found that only two CSR elements are the significant predictors of employee retention among Gen Y in the case of financial-based firms in Malaysia.

Research limitations/implications

This research covers Gen Y employees in accounting firms; thus, generalization is not applicable to other generations. Besides, the predictors of the research study utilize Carroll’s pyramid of CSR. Therefore, future research studies are encouraged to validate the research model into other sectors. Other models of CSR could also be used.

Practical implications

This paper includes implication for the organization to understand employee retention practices on Gen Y who are currently dominating the workforce.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills an identified need to study how CSR practices could enhance employee retention among Gen Y in the organization.

Details

Revista de Gestão, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1809-2276

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Norhayati Zakaria, Wan-Nurisma Ayu Wan-Ismail and Asmat-Nizam Abdul-Talib

The purpose of this research is to understand the importance of value orientation on conspicuous consumption in the youth market segment in Southeast Asia. In particular…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to understand the importance of value orientation on conspicuous consumption in the youth market segment in Southeast Asia. In particular, the focus is to understand three different types of value orientation (specifically cultural values, material values and religious values) and its effects on conspicuous consumption behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrative theoretical model is proposed based on Hofstede's cultural dimension, the materialism value scale and religious commitments to predict the relationship for the value orientations of Generation Y's (Gen Y's) conspicuous consumption behaviour. The data was collected from undergraduate students enrolled in general education courses in three universities in Malaysia. Using cross-sectional data, 262 sets of valid questionnaires were used to perform the statistical analysis for the measurement and structural model using partial least squares equation modelling (PLS-SEM) path modelling.

Findings

We position our study by raising the pertinent question of “Seriously, Conspicuous Consumption?” to establish a clear understanding of whether Malaysian Gen Y individuals are conspicuous consumers and, if they are, which of the three values matter the most. In order to answer the question of whether Malaysian Gen Y engages in conspicuous consumption, we arrive at an understanding that, given multi-value orientations, conspicuous behaviour can be motivated and impacted by one value orientation and constrained by others. Hence, value orientation offers an insightful explanation of one specific type of consumer behaviour in the context of Asia as an emerging global market. Thus, our study provides two key theoretically significant findings. In general, our findings provide insights into how the multi-value orientations (i.e. cultural, material and religious orientations) contribute to several bodies of literature—namely, conspicuous consumption, international marketing and transcultural marketing. The results revealed that collectivism and materialism were positively and significantly related to conspicuous consumption. Uncertainty avoidance, although significant, had a negative relationship with conspicuous consumption. The other values (masculinity, power distance and religious values) were not significantly related to conspicuous consumption.

Research limitations/implications

Purchasing luxury goods is becoming an emergent phenomenon in Asia, particularly among young consumers. This paper provides marketing managers, particularly brand owners, with practical and realisable examples of how to plan and execute their marketing plans. A more profound understanding of this relationship may also serve to aid marketing managers in devising more focused marketing strategies and thus allocate marketing resources more efficiently. Hence, marketers could develop an effective communication strategy so that the target consumers will be aware of their goods because the purchase of luxury goods is likely to be motivated by social, cultural and personal factors.

Originality/value

This article examines the impact of value orientations on conspicuous consumption behaviour in Malaysian Gen Y consumers. The model proposed in this study is useful in predicting conspicuous consumption among Gen Y. By identifying the factors influencing this emergent type of consumer behaviour, global retailers will be informed about this particular market segmentation in terms of its preferences and desires. The article discusses the research findings and concludes with managerial implications and limitations.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Shikha N. Khera and Sahil Malik

The purpose of this paper is to explore the life priorities of Gen Y, the largest cohort of generation in India. Further variations in the life priorities of Gen Y with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the life priorities of Gen Y, the largest cohort of generation in India. Further variations in the life priorities of Gen Y with regard to their demographics have also been analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten-item Schwartz Value Inventory was subjected to factor analysis to explore defining factors for studying the life priorities of Gen Y in Indian context. Respondents ranking of the factors so revealed will allow us to study their preferred life priorities. The effect of demographics was assessed by employing an independent sample t-test.

Findings

Factor analysis revealed two factors, “materialism” and “altruism,” and Gen Y preferred materialism over altruism as their life priority. Gender and work experience did not show significant differences with regard to the life preferences Gen Y.

Practical implications

Gen Y is increasing its presence at workplaces across the world, and limited research has been done to study their motivations, needs and expectations at work in Indian context. This study could help managers gain insightful information related to the life priorities of Gen Y which could be harnessed to make effective strategies for their recruitment and retention.

Originality/value

The paper provides a valuable contribution by measuring the life priorities of Gen Y in India and adds to the scant literature on this cohort of generation.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Ruth N. Bolton, A. Parasuraman, Ankie Hoefnagels, Nanne Migchels, Sertan Kabadayi, Thorsten Gruber, Yuliya Komarova Loureiro and David Solnet

The purpose of this paper is to review what we know – and don't know – about Generation Y's use of social media and to assess the implications for individuals, firms and society.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review what we know – and don't know – about Generation Y's use of social media and to assess the implications for individuals, firms and society.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper distinguishes Generation Y from other cohorts in terms of systematic differences in values, preferences and behavior that are stable over time (as opposed to maturational or other differences). It describes their social media use and highlights evidence of intra‐generational variance arising from environmental factors (including economic, cultural, technological and political/legal factors) and individual factors. Individual factors include stable factors (including socio‐economic status, age and lifecycle stage) and dynamic, endogenous factors (including goals, emotions, and social norms).The paper discusses how Generation Y's use of social media influences individuals, firms and society. It develops managerial implications and a research agenda.

Findings

Prior research on the social media use of Generation Y raises more questions than it answers. It: focuses primarily on the USA and/or (at most) one other country, ignoring other regions with large and fast‐growing Generation Y populations where social‐media use and its determinants may differ significantly; tends to study students whose behaviors may change over their life cycle stages; relies on self‐reports by different age groups to infer Generation Y's social media use; and does not examine the drivers and outcomes of social‐media use. This paper's conceptual framework yields a detailed set of research questions.

Originality/value

This paper provides a conceptual framework for considering the antecedents and consequences of Generation Y's social media usage. It identifies unanswered questions about Generation Y's use of social media, as well as practical insights for managers.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Naser Valaei and S.R. Nikhashemi

The advent of media and technology has led to growing inclination among Generation Y (Gen-Y) consumers towards diverse fashion influences and they tend to dress either to…

Abstract

Purpose

The advent of media and technology has led to growing inclination among Generation Y (Gen-Y) consumers towards diverse fashion influences and they tend to dress either to fit in with their peers or to articulate self-identity and conform to the society. This trend has become a fashion dilemma and the purpose of this paper is to leverage on this matter by investigating the factors influencing the Gen-Y consumers’ attitude and purchase intention towards fashion apparel.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 250 respondents is used to assess the measurement and structural models, by applying a partial least squares-structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) approach.

Findings

The results indicate that brand and self-identity are the factors that most shape Gen-Y consumers’ attitudes towards fashion apparel. Furthermore, brand, style, price, and social identity are the most influential factors of Gen-Y consumers’ purchase intention for fashion apparels. The findings also show that style, price, country of origin, and social identity are not relevant to Gen-Y consumers’ attitudes towards fashion apparel, and that country of origin and self-identity do not have any relationship with the Gen-Y consumers’ purchase intention.

Originality/value

This study is among the few attempts to investigate the Gen-Y consumers’ buying behaviour of fashion apparel based on the theory of planned behaviour, optimal distinctiveness theory, and social identity theory. PLS-multi-group analysis reveals that age, gender, and income are moderating variables of several proposed structural relationships.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Amanda Warmerdam, Ioni Lewis and Tamara Banks

Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) framework, the purpose of this paper is to explore whether the standard TPB constructs explained variance in Generation Y (Gen Y

Abstract

Purpose

Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) framework, the purpose of this paper is to explore whether the standard TPB constructs explained variance in Generation Y (Gen Y) individuals’ intentions to join their ideal organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach was used featuring qualitative and quantitative methods.

Findings

The overall TPB model accounted for a significant 51.6 per cent of the variance in intention to join one’s ideal organisation in the next six months with the significant predictors in the model being subjective norm and perceived behaviour control but not attitude.

Research limitations/implications

Using graduating students from a single Australian university sample may mean that the current findings may not extend to all Gen Y individuals. The current study has demonstrated the explanatory utility of the TPB in relation to graduate Gen Y’s intention to join their ideal organisation, providing further evidence of the robustness of the TPB framework in an organisational setting.

Practical implications

These findings have implications for enhancing understanding of the most effective recruitment processes for Gen Y students entering the workforce. The findings could inform recruitment policies and strategies to attract Gen Y applicants.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge this study is the first application of the TPB to this topic. The current research extends the recruitment literature with a theoretically based investigation. Identification of factors which inform organisational recruitment strategies, allow organisations to stand out from their competitors and potentially achieve a larger application pool from which to select the best human capital and sustain competitive advantage.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 57 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Luke Butcher, Ian Phau and Anwar Sadat Shimul

The purpose of this paper is to explore the existence of consumers’ need for uniqueness (CNFU) and status consumption (SC) in Generation Y (Gen Y). In exploring such, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the existence of consumers’ need for uniqueness (CNFU) and status consumption (SC) in Generation Y (Gen Y). In exploring such, the equivalency of each construct (measurement invariance and population heterogeneity) is examined across early and late Gen Y consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered online survey is examined, with the sample of 397 Gen Y respondents analyzed through structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results reveal that Gen Y consumers experience a need for uniqueness in a three-factor composition which is invariant across earlier and later Gen Y consumers. Similarly, SC is observed amongst Gen Y, with the empirical results again equivalent across the two groups. Finally, SC is supported to directly influence Gen Y’s purchase intention (PI) of luxury fashion goods, with the three CNFU constructs failing to directly influence PI, or SC’s influence on PI.

Practical implications

Results suggest to practitioners that not only are CNFU and SC motivations existent in Gen Y consumers, but they act similarly across early (19-23) and later (24-34) members of the consumer segment. Additionally, SC positively influences Gen Y’s purchase behavior of luxury fashion goods. Practitioners may target such consumers with reassurance that these groups do not behave differently with respect to CNFU and SC.

Originality/value

This study explores for the first time the three factors of CNFU and SC amongst Gen Y consumers. Such analysis, including the invariance of responses between those later and earlier born Gen Y consumers, and the structural relationships shared between these constructs and PI of luxury fashion goods offer intriguing insights for academics and practitioners alike.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2019

Nidhi Arora and Vijay Dhole

The purpose of this paper is to examine expectations of Generation Y (born between 1980 and 2000) entrants to Indian industry, in respect of their perspective, job…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine expectations of Generation Y (born between 1980 and 2000) entrants to Indian industry, in respect of their perspective, job experiences, considerations and initial employment expectations. Keeping in mind that organizations are required to prepare for the expectations of Generation Y. Human resources (HR) practitioners should consider the next generation as strategic business partners in the twenty-first-century workplaces, questions ignite about Generation Y’s values and aspirations and how we can engage them in our workplaces. This study was an attempt to look at Indian Gen Y employees who comprise almost half of the Indian working population and are growing at a rapid pace. Effective understanding of Gen Y will lead to the designing of effective HR policies and environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilizing quantitative research methods, an exploratory study was undertaken with 520 employees (all of whom fell into the category of Generation Y) from various industries.

Findings

The study found that many of the propositions contained within the Generation Y literature were reflected among participants in relation to their future career and lifestyle aspirations. This hints to the need for industry to carefully benchmark employee expectations and experiences to ensure commitment to the sector.

Research limitations/implications

Being an exploratory study, the results are not generalizable to the wider population. The findings frame a future longitudinal study on the careers of Generation Y graduates as they move from the anticipation to the encounter stage of their career development. This will seek to further explore the implications of Generation Y values, including those relating to diversity and equality which were not raised as an issue in this preliminary study.

Practical implications

The findings of this research contribute to our knowledge of the career aspirations of Generation Y. The paper indicates to employers some of the future benchmarkings in recruitment and HR practices that they might adopt to meet the needs of this generation of employees. It is anticipated that this paper will interest new and experienced HR practitioners. Interest might spark ongoing inquiry into effective approaches for employee engagements, specifically to Gen Y employees who will be ruling the workplace in the coming decade. The Gen Y has also led to attrition problems. Therefore, this paper will help in the effective understanding of Gen Y and designing strategies for internal benchmarking in various policies.

Originality/value

This work is a unique effort to look at the common expectations of the Gen Y employees, from the workplace. The findings highlighted the general expectations which are normally neglected in high strategical environment of today’s tech-savvy industry.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Jenna Luscombe, Ioni Lewis and Herbert C. Biggs

Generation Y (Gen Y) is the newest and largest generation entering the workforce. Gen Y may differ from previous generations in work‐related characteristics which may have…

Abstract

Purpose

Generation Y (Gen Y) is the newest and largest generation entering the workforce. Gen Y may differ from previous generations in work‐related characteristics which may have recruitment and retention repercussions. Currently, limited theoretically‐based research exists regarding Gen Y's work expectations and goals in relation to undergraduate students and graduates. The aim of this paper is to attempt to address this gap in the research.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted a theoretically‐based investigation of the work expectations and goals of Generation Y and, in particular, student Gen Y versus working Gen Y individuals based within a framework incorporating both expectancy‐value and goal setting theories. n=398 provided useable data via an on‐line survey.

Findings

Overall, some support was found for predictions with career goals loading on a separate component to daily work expectations and significant differences between students and working Gen Y on career goals. No significant differences were found, however, between the two groups in daily work expectations.

Research limitations/implications

Future research studies may benefit from adopting a theoretical framework which assesses both daily work expectations and career goals. At a practical level, based on the findings, some examples are provided of the means by which organisations may draw upon daily work expectations and career goals of importance to Gen Y and, in doing so, influence the likelihood that a Gen Y individual will join and remain at their particular organisation.

Originality/value

This research has demonstrated the utility of adopting a sound theoretical framework in furthering understanding about the motivations which influence an organisations’ ability to recruit and retain Gen Y.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2019

Rozaimah Zainudin, Nurul Shahnaz Mahdzan and Ming-Yee Yeap

The concept of “buy now pay later” leads Malaysian Generation Y (Gen Y) to excessively use their credit cards for spending. To gauge the extent of this worrisome scenario…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of “buy now pay later” leads Malaysian Generation Y (Gen Y) to excessively use their credit cards for spending. To gauge the extent of this worrisome scenario, the purpose of this paper is to attempt to investigate the factors, including credit attitudes, knowledge on credit card, materialism, social norm and self-efficacy, that influence credit card misuse amongst Gen Y in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have collected responses from a total of 501 respondents in two urban areas in Malaysia and estimated six multiple regression models to test five hypotheses.

Findings

The results suggest that credit card knowledge and self-efficacy are negatively related to credit card misuse amongst Gen Y in Malaysia. In contrast, positive relationships were found to exist between credit card attitudes, materialism and social norm and the dependent variable.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, the authors limit the data collection to the two biggest urban areas in Malaysia, namely, Klang Valley and Ipoh.

Practical implications

For the regulator’s perspective, the results can be used to understand the alarming indebtedness behaviour amongst working members of Gen Y and outline appropriate and effective policies to reduce their serious indebtedness. Financial service providers, however, can collaborate with regulators to curb credit card misuse amongst Gen Y, so that the latter can avoid high bad debt from line of credit facilities and bankruptcy.

Originality/value

The study’s findings will further enrich the existing literature on the factors affecting the credit card misuse, especially for the unique Gen Y cohort in Malaysia.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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