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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2011

Gemma Bruce, Gerald Wistow and Richard Kramer

Connected Care, Turning Point's model for involving the community in the design and delivery of integrated health and well‐being services, aims to involve the community in…

Abstract

Connected Care, Turning Point's model for involving the community in the design and delivery of integrated health and well‐being services, aims to involve the community in the commissioning process in a way which fundamentally shifts the balance of power in favour of local people. The model has been tested in a number of areas across the country, and previous articles in the Journal of Integrated Care have charted the progress of the original pilot in Hartlepool. Cost‐benefits of the approach are now becoming clearer. Implementation of a new community‐led social enterprise in Hartlepool began in 2007, and today its Connected Care service provides community outreach, information, access to a range of health and social care services, advocacy, co‐ordination and low‐level support to the people of Owton. Key lessons, from Hartlepool and elsewhere, have centred on the value of making the case for service redesign from the ‘bottom up’ and building the capacity of the community to play a role in service delivery, while also promoting strong leadership within commissioning organisations to build ‘top‐down’ support for the implementation of outcomes defined through intensive community engagement. The new Government's ‘localism’ agenda creates new opportunities for community‐led integration, and the Connected Care pilots provide a number of learning points about how this agenda might be successfully progressed.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2009

Charlie Frowd and Gemma Hepton

The police often ask witnesses and victims to construct a facial composite of people they have seen committing a crime. Research has suggested, however, that these images…

Abstract

The police often ask witnesses and victims to construct a facial composite of people they have seen committing a crime. Research has suggested, however, that these images are of poor quality due to memory decay, the face construction method used and the presence of the external facial features (hair, ears, face shape). In the current work, the role of the most important external feature, hair, was explored. Participants were shown an unfamiliar target face and constructed a composite of it 24 hours later using a modern recognition‐based system and one of three types of hair: exact, similar or poor match to the target. Better‐matching hair was found to help participants construct a more identifiable central region of the face (eyes, brows, nose, mouth). The results highlight the importance of accurate hair at the start of the construction session. Implications for police practice are discussed.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2007

Gemma Cervantes

To describe a way of teaching industrial ecology (IE) and to show some tools that may help for the IE teaching.

Abstract

Purpose

To describe a way of teaching industrial ecology (IE) and to show some tools that may help for the IE teaching.

Design/methodology/approach

In the paper, the development of lectures, practical lessons and projects on real industrial ecosystems are described. Also the teaching materials used are described.

Findings

The presented methodology for teaching IE has been a good means for the understanding of the IE concept. Some of the educational tools presented have helped the students to increase their awareness of the distance between IE and the real industrial field, discover that there are a lot of by‐product exchange possibilities between industries, to develop their creativity, to connect the theory to practice in the industrial systems and have encouraged them to try to put the IE ideas into practice. This methodology has been useful for either small or big groups and for people with either the same or very different backgrounds. And it has been observed that the quality of the work is enhanced when the members of the group have different backgrounds.

Practical implications

The paper shows methodologies and tools that may encourage and help other teachers/professors to use them in their IE lessons. It may also help IE researches to know which real examples and methodologies help students to understand IE concept. This could encourage them to develop projects and research in those directions.

Originality/value

The paper fulfils the need of knowing real experiences in IE teaching and their results. And in special, experiences that have been tested for a long period of time and with a great number of students. All the experiences described in the paper have been created and put into practice by the author.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Abstract

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Tim Shaw, Deborah McGregor, Sue Sinclair, Robert Sutherland, Ana Munro and Jackie Ross

Cancer care is complex and an integrated cancer pathway involves many health professionals in a variety of care settings using many skills. The widely distributed and…

Abstract

Purpose

Cancer care is complex and an integrated cancer pathway involves many health professionals in a variety of care settings using many skills. The widely distributed and heterogeneous nature of the cancer workforce raises significant challenges with respect to professional development. Cancer Learning is a government-funded initiative designed to provide access to a wide range of quality online learning resources for all health care professionals involved in the care of cancer patients and their families. The purpose of this paper is to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-phase project, led by a consortium of national stakeholders in cancer care, informed the design, build, and deployment of Cancer Learning; an online, evidence based, information and learning portal to support professional development of health professionals across the continuum of cancer care in Australia. An action research approach allowed for an iterative process of ongoing dynamic evaluation and improvement of this workforce improvement resource.

Findings

The National Government Agency, Cancer Australia's Cancer Learning online hub has been supporting the professional development requirements of cancer care professionals since the site deployment in 2007. Since launch, site usage continues to grow and evaluations have been positive. Time constraints of health professionals continue to be a major barrier to sustained online learning participation.

Originality/value

This research recount of the development and implementation of an Australia first national online learning initiative highlights the rigorous approach undertaken for the delivery of a quality evidence-based resource for the professional development of all health professionals involved in the delivery of cancer care.

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